Should I get a hybrid vehicle?

The Achilles heel might be cobalt, there are 37.9 million licensed vehicles in Great Britain,
37.9 million batteries needed just for the UK, number needed to cover the rest of the world
FK,

THE ONLY thing that can accelerate as fast as an electric car is the price of the most expensive metal in its batteries. Once a niche input used to strengthen turbine blades, cobalt’s value has soared since it started to feature in modern electronics. Most phones need a few grams’ worth, and every car requires 5-10kg. That adds up. Many business models are based on ample reservoirs of cobalt that experts warn do not exist.
Soaring demand for a commodity is usually met by vaulting investment to ensure supply. Cobalt’s case is somewhat different. Nearly all of it is obtained as a by-product of mining nickel and copper. Even the sharp rise in cobalt’s price thus far has not been enough to justify fresh investment in digging more nickel and copper out of the ground. Worse, most of it is in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where neat models of supply and demand count for little.
And the companies need to learn from the US rare earth mineral mining companies
China swamps the markets with so much neodymium, that the American mines are forced out of business
then they hike the prices , yanks want to reopen the mines and get them back to full production , estimated to take up to 10 years
 
And the companies need to learn from the US rare earth mineral mining companies
China swamps the markets with so much neodymium, that the American mines are forced out of business
then they hike the prices , yanks want to reopen the mines and get them back to full production , estimated to take up to 10 years
Just like they did with steel.
 
And the companies need to learn from the US rare earth mineral mining companies
China swamps the markets with so much neodymium, that the American mines are forced out of business
then they hike the prices , yanks want to reopen the mines and get them back to full production , estimated to take up to 10 years
On Google maps " Baotou, Inner Mongolia, China" [without " " ] see the most polluted place in the world
due to rare earth metal mining
 
Electricity is much cheaper in most western countries compared to petrol/diesel.

Of course the government will recoup their losses. However its still likely to be cheaper.
Not so convinced,
If we were to switch to electric cars totally we would need at least 8 new nuclear power stations to fulfill demand

That electricity won't be cheap when we have to fund those power stations
 
Not so convinced,
If we were to switch to electric cars totally we would need at least 8 new nuclear power stations to fulfill demand

That electricity won't be cheap when we have to fund those power stations
We wont have to **** about with petrol stations, fuel tankers, refineries etc. There will also be less pollution.

When power plants are built their owners dont do it from the goodness of their heart, they'll do it because they know they will get a return on their money, but chances are it will still be cheaper that petrol/diesel,
 
Hydrogen fuel-celled cars are the future. Or at least will be when we finish listening to the whining of the likes of Lucas, Packham and Porritt and start banging them up in the grey bar hotel which will stop their hideous, out of all proportion influence on those that call themselves our political masters.

Standard hybrid and all-electric vehicles are nothing but a greenwash con trick. And expensive ones at that.
 
Hydrogen fuel-celled cars are the future. Or at least will be when we finish listening to the whining of the likes of Lucas, Packham and Porritt and start banging them up in the grey bar hotel which will stop their hideous, out of all proportion influence on those that call themselves our political masters.

Standard hybrid and all-electric vehicles are nothing but a greenwash con trick. And expensive ones at that.
Except in the countries where they are growing in popularity and they work fine obviously.
 
Apparently the co2 produced by building a hybrid is equivalent to building a mid sized BMW and running it for 3 years. After 10 years, the BMW is nicely run in and the hybrid needs new batteries, which cost more than the car is worth... give it a few years and someone will notice that there’s a rather large pile of dead batteries that no one knows what to do with.

*also available in pessimistic *
 
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I took a Prius Plus out for a test drive this morning. Hybrid electric and petrol 1.8.
Most impressed with the start and very smooth and quick. Test drive was in a town and about 8 km (around 5 miles).
Speed was less than 50kph (31mph) in the first mile or so due to traffic and the electric motor stayed nice and smooth. Going round a roundabout nice and quick but, coming off the roundabout, up a small incline - not even a hill. Engine switched to petrol straight away.

Coming back and on a dual carriageway. As soon as I got over 50k the petrol kicked in again.
All in all. the electric bit on the 5 mile trip was only engaged for less than 2 of them and that was all through a town.
Obviously the electric wouldn't be on at all on a rural run so I can't really see the advantage of the hybrid engine except on very short commuting runs (which I don't do).

Only disconcerting thing was the electric switching back in when the speed dropped to less than 10kph approaching lights and junctions.

The other thing was that, in both this Prius and a Skoda Kodiaq I went to have a look at (nice car but price rather hefty when you start adding the bells and whistles) is that neither had their own satnav. Both had a connector (either wired or bluetooth) for your mobile phone and used the GPS on that, albeit it showing on the screen and the commands through the speakers

All well and good if you have the type of mobile phone that links like that. I have a Nokia 150 that sends and receives telephone calls and texts only as it's all I've needed up until now.

Peugeot 5008 actually had its own satnav but felt very restricted inside with a huge centre console and bar separating the driver and passenger.

Looks like I'll be sticking with my dirty, polluting diesel X Trail for a while. My Samsung smart phone (in the bottom drawer of my dresser) would connect to the car but lose the settings so I'd have to set the bluetooth connection every time I got in and it wouldn't download my phone book. My Nokia 150 connects immediately and displays the phone book on screen as well.
 
After going round several dealers, I can see one big disadvantage for the Hybrid versions.
Toyota Yaris difference in price from a petrol up to a hybrid is €5500, a Kia Sportage difference is €8000 and the Mitsubishi Outlander difference between diesel and PHEV is a whopping €13000.

Had a good chat with one of the dealers who I happen to know outside the dealership. He reckons it will be close to 10 years before hybrids start being competitive with oil burners and even longer before all electric vehicles start coming down.

Interestingly, on a reliability test on cars (those that need the least repairs/garage work etc) showed the least reliable car of all with over 60% of cars going in for work was the Tesla. Maybe just new technology that can't be fixed on the spot but several complaining of work taking over a week to carry out.
 
Final on this, hopefully. I have bought a hybrid after all that.
It's a Kia Sportage hybrid but, although it has an extra electric engine, it doesn't run on that alone. It's called a "mild" hybrid and it gives a boost to the 2.0 l diesel engine I ordered. As far as I can tell, it cuts the fuel consumption and emissions down and, when the car stops at roundabouts or traffic lights etc (which some do) then the electric engine cuts in for takeoff to avoid the main engine starting up with the shudder and delay I get when my X-Trail does that.

Reason for buying this was that the difference was €3000 extra but I got the premium pack (360 deg camera, front and rear parking cameras, auto tailgate and quite a bit more) thrown in which normally cost €3200.

The battery for the hybrid engine is stuck in the boot (next to the reduced size spare which I had to pay extra for instead of the gunge o spray) and doesn't seem to take up much room.

Not fully embraced electric vehicle technology but one little step as they say.
 
The problem is that as you tow, the wheels of the leccy vehicle overcharge its battery.
If you can fit a battery isolator switch then all will be fine.
I prefer the outlook of a mate of mine who is a very highly paid lawyer.
She said carbon fuelled vehicles are going to be gone in a matter of years so **** it.
She went and bought herself a 6.8 liter twin turbo Merc.
That was the thinking in 1989 when I bought a V12 XJs. I may have been a bit previous...
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Not so convinced,
If we were to switch to electric cars totally we would need at least 8 new nuclear power stations to fulfill demand

That electricity won't be cheap when we have to fund those power stations
and the power distribution network to your homes and the infrastructure feeding it is not up to the massive hike in loads
lots of houses only have a 60Amp supply fed by an oil filled, paper insulated lead sheathed cable, there are still a few 40 amp systems in use, you need 100 amps as a bare minimum for car charging and to supply your other electrical needs
A far better way forward would be to cut the amount of large cars on the road, reduce unnecessary short journeys and encourage people to walk or cycle
 
Last year, my cousin chopped his 3-yr old 7 seat diesel XTrail company car in for a Mitsubishi Outlander petrol hybrid. It is excellent: comfortable, spacious, well-equipped and has a decent range. I am thinking of doing the same as my privately-owned diesel XTrail will be 5 this Christmas.
You will be lucky to 30mpg out of it.
 
Electricity is much cheaper in most western countries compared to petrol/diesel.

Of course the government will recoup their losses. However its still likely to be cheaper.
Not when the Pikeys nick the charging cable to your motor on the street/drive every night. **** knows how people living in apartment blocks will charge their motors up.
 
We wont have to **** about with petrol stations, fuel tankers, refineries etc. There will also be less pollution.

When power plants are built their owners dont do it from the goodness of their heart, they'll do it because they know they will get a return on their money, but chances are it will still be cheaper that petrol/diesel,
Guess why the Japs have bottled out of building one in Anglsey ... wait for it return on investment would take to long and not generate enough investor capital. Its a good job you can walk from the mess to your stores.
 

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