Should I get a hybrid vehicle?

My 20 year old car is on it's last legs and I'm thinking of leasing a petrol hybrid through work (specifically a Toyota Yaris).
I average around 250 miles a week, mostly urban (around 40mph) and spend about £180 a month on petrol, £21 a month on car insurance, £22 on car tax.
The lease contract will be £240 a month, all inclusive.

Is the petrol saving going to be enough to make it worth it?

Thoughts please :)
 

needlewaver

Old-Salt
My missus had a 1.4 diesel Yaris and last year changed to a 1.8 petrol/hybrid Auris. I cant tell you off the top of my head what her VEL is but she's only filling up every six to eight weeks now, with a commute of about 100 miles a week; Her car has a series of settings that are user selectable and without boring you with tedium she has hers on ECO wihich basically means in ideal conditions, under 30mph, she runs on the battery.

If its cold and you switch on the heaters/demisters/lights etc., the petrol engine will kick in sooner, maybe even when you switch on but does cut out when not needed. She's getting 60+ mpg with her dainty right foot, and even I have trouble getting it below 50mpg.

All Toyota hybrids are CVT automatics however, if thats a drama? Having had access to both the Yaris and now an Auris, would work spring for an Auris? Is just that bit smoother and the boot is far larger.

Ian.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
My 20 year old car is on it's last legs and I'm thinking of leasing a petrol hybrid through work (specifically a Toyota Yaris).
I average around 250 miles a week, mostly urban (around 40mph) and spend about £180 a month on petrol, £21 a month on car insurance, £22 on car tax.
The lease contract will be £240 a month, all inclusive.

Is the petrol saving going to be enough to make it worth it?

Thoughts please :)
Judging by your driving style and what I have seen when being driven in my friend's Toyota Prius I would say that a hybrid Yaris will suit you perfectly.
 

Ned_Seagoon

Old-Salt
I have had a Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV for three years. A great drive, tows superbly and a damned site cheaper to run than my old Subaru. Have to admit that I don’t do home-charging as often as I should do, but I can still rack up my green smug points and have a lot of fun scaring pedestrians who don’t hear me creeping up on them.
 
Friends have hybrid Yaris and Mitsubishi. they have also had a charging point installed on the wall of their house. Depreciation on the battery can be a bugger and the battery loses efficiency gradually over time and with number of charges. On the plus side, the Yaris costs buttons to insure and makes sense if you have access to a charging point at home or work.
 
My missus had a 1.4 diesel Yaris and last year changed to a 1.8 petrol/hybrid Auris. I cant tell you off the top of my head what her VEL is but she's only filling up every six to eight weeks now, with a commute of about 100 miles a week; Her car has a series of settings that are user selectable and without boring you with tedium she has hers on ECO wihich basically means in ideal conditions, under 30mph, she runs on the battery.

If its cold and you switch on the heaters/demisters/lights etc., the petrol engine will kick in sooner, maybe even when you switch on but does cut out when not needed. She's getting 60+ mpg with her dainty right foot, and even I have trouble getting it below 50mpg.

All Toyota hybrids are CVT automatics however, if thats a drama? Having had access to both the Yaris and now an Auris, would work spring for an Auris? Is just that bit smoother and the boot is far larger.

Ian.
Good info, thanks. I want the Yaris because I want a small car (intention at some point is to tow behind a campervan) but unfortunately they don't do an Aygo hybrid (and I'm sold on Toyota).
 

greyfergie

MIA
Book Reviewer
I drive a gentleman businessman around two days a week because he lost his licence due to drink driving [the irony eh:roll: - awaits incoming] and its in his car - a hybrid Mitsubishi Outlander, and I've frankly been amazed at its performance. I think whereas once I may have poo pood the idea of an electric or hybrid car I'm now a bit of a convert. I was very nervous driving it in the snow but the smoothness of the electric power down really helped in the conditions. OK the overnight charge is luck to deliver you 30 miles before the [very quiet] petrol engine [1800 I believe in petrol] which will improve with time I'm sure, but its rubbish. However if most of your journeys are in town or a city and less its brilliant. He's got it on economy 7 too and it has hardly affected his bill. I'm sold and thats a big beast of a car with 4 wheel drive etc,,, I'm sure the Yaris would be better than that!
 

LEMONONE

Clanker
Good info, thanks. I want the Yaris because I want a small car (intention at some point is to tow behind a campervan) but unfortunately they don't do an Aygo hybrid (and I'm sold on Toyota).
You deserve a ARRSE Guardroom car for your years of input to this site.
 
I had Toyota Auris as a hire car a couple of weeks ago though work, and it wasn’t bad. A bit weird driving on battery until you get used to it as it’s very quiet!

Nice little car though. But buy a Jag as mentioned!

MB
 
I wondered about the expense of out of warranty replacement batteries, as we are considering going hybrid later next year.
It's not an issue according to this.
The Toyota Hybrid Warranty: technology you can rely on
I used a lot of hybrid taxis on Oz last October, and all the drivers swore they were the best thing since sliced bread from reliabilty to fuel economy.
The cars I was in were bigger Toyotas...Avensis I think, but one guy had topped up his fuel tank two weeks before my fare and still had a half tank left! And that was urban commuting fares.
I was sold.
What I noticed was the instant "off the lights" torque delivery. Smooth, seamless, and the whole thing felt hyper efficient & fuss free.
 

LEMONONE

Clanker
I'm sure the 1st law of thermodynamics will have a say whether or not a hybrid saves gas or uses it to charge the batteries.
 
Do it . You can always shift it on in 3 years if you have any worries about future expensive repair bills. I can't see any other car that will fit the bill for what you want, as even if you get a micro engined petrol car you will still be using 2-3 tanks of petrol a month and paying at least say £130 + for the car.
If you buying on finance etc check the millage your allowed ( goes without saying ).
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
Friends have hybrid Yaris and Mitsubishi. they have also had a charging point installed on the wall of their house. Depreciation on the battery can be a bugger and the battery loses efficiency gradually over time and with number of charges. On the plus side, the Yaris costs buttons to insure and makes sense if you have access to a charging point at home or work.
Charging point? This is a hybrid that @Grey_Mafia65 is considering.
 
I'm sure the 1st law of thermodynamics will have a say whether or not a hybrid saves gas or uses it to charge the batteries.
True.
But given pence per mile costs for any fossil fuelled car are often much more than people sometimes realise, if they ignore real-life number crunching ( to include Road Fund based on CO2, servicing etc) then hybrids let people of a few hooks.
I'm painfully aware our Mx5s nudge £450.00 annual Road Funding collectively but our son's 1.25 Zetec Fiesta is £30.00 p/a!
In retirement, the thought of near to zero Road Fund for a kick off, plus essentially 80 + mpg has a certain appeal.
It's horses for courses I think. Won't rid either of the 5's, but I'd SORN mine for summer only. It costs sweety money to run anyway.
A hybrid for us would be used for general urban work.
 
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All the taxi companies in my city switched their fleets to hybrids in the mid 2000s. In 10 years the only non-hybrid cabs I've seen are vans outfitted with a lift for loading and unloading wheelchairs.

How much less will an all inclusive lease cost for a non-hybrid subcompact?
 

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