Shotguns-show us your kit

She’s certainly a fixer upper.

Year is 1928 or 29.

Unusual top rib.

I couldn’t give a fair appraisal on the barrels without seeing it in the flesh and measuring the wall thickness. Might just need a light polish and reblacking which is a 100 quid job. Might need new barrels which is a 12 grand job (if you get it done properly by Purdeys).

Again hard to give a value without knowing the full condition. More than 4 less than 10.
Its got assisted opening and the action is tight , bores are good, theres an odd mark on the lower stock , not sure if its been put there deliberately on just banged , also an interesting crown logo .
Pur 1.jpg
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Its got assisted opening and the action is tight , bores are good, theres an odd mark on the lower stock , not sure if its been put there deliberately on just banged , also an interesting crown logo .View attachment 380225
All of them had assisted opening after 1882. The action was designed by Fredrick Beasley.

I reckon that’s just an interesting shaped ding on the stock. The crown doesn’t look familiar and is pretty badly engraved, probably done later in it’s life.

What’s the story with it? You buying it?
 
All of them had assisted opening after 1882. The action was designed by Fredrick Beasley.

I reckon that’s just an interesting shaped ding on the stock. The crown doesn’t look familiar and is pretty badly engraved, probably done later in it’s life.

What’s the story with it? You buying it?
A mates got it in for blacking .
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
It’s not the roughest Purdey I’ve ever seen, but it’s in the top ten.

Sad to see stuff like that in such a shitty state. That was handmade by some very very skilled men and designed to last forever.
 
It’s not the roughest Purdey I’ve ever seen, but it’s in the top ten.

Sad to see stuff like that in such a shitty state. That was handmade by some very very skilled men and designed to last forever.
It`s been in the owners family since new , clearly some of the latest family have little respect for what they have.
 
SM, a few questions..
do you know your eye dominance?
are you right handed?
who 'fitted' the gun to you?
was your shooting OK with other/previous guns?
How long have you been shooting?

Like one of the other posters, this sounds like an eye dominance issue. Whilst you can't do anything to change your dominance, there are lots of other things you can do,
Shooting with a canted gun and eyes not level will create an immediate benefit, but it doesn't create the basis from which to continually improve. The problem can be sorted, just need to understand the exact nature of the problem.
My apologies, I had not seen your post.

do you know your eye dominance? Yes I am right eye dominant, checked and double checked at Barbury Shooting School

are you right handed? Yes
who 'fitted' the gun to you? Gun fit was measured at the West London Shooting School, measurements handed to the chap the gunsmith at Greenfields in Salisbury.
was your shooting OK with other/previous guns? It did seem to be (Miroku, Blazer F16 and Browning 725) usually at least 50 percent hits.
How long have you been shooting? Not long with shotguns, about 8 months now.

I am shooting again on Saturday so I will see how I get on.
 
I had a very enjoyable day yesterday with 35 out of 50 (unfortunately one trap was just horrible with nobody getting above 4/10). I ended the day just 3 off the winning score for the group which I was pleased at so I will be sticking with the 'cant' for the time being.
 
Last edited:

skeetstar

Old-Salt
SM a few thoughts. You seem to know what you are talking about, so I put tthese things out for your consideration, rather than anything else. Hope I don't come across as too smart ass.

Eye dominance - some folks have been told they are fully right eye dominant when they are not, Dominance isn't binary for everyone. Some folks are mid dominant (neither eye is dominant) some folks are 'almost' right (or left) eye dominant. If you were the latter it would result in you canting your head over the stock to line up the beads or canting the gun for the beads to line up with your eye dominance. Have you tried mounting the gun with your left eye closed - do you still need to cant the gun if you have? Did Barbury check your dominance with the gun in your face?

Secondly gun fit. If you are completely right eye dominant and you have the right stance then the gun fit is wrong, it must be. It almost sounds to me like you are a right hander with a stock cast for a left hander. Are you happy that the fitting was done competently and that the gunsmith faithfully followed the measurements? Did Greenfields check the mount/fit when they gave you the gun back?

Lastly gun mount, when you mount the gun your jaw should lie along the wood of the stock, some people who stand a bit to square to the target can get the notch of their cheek on the comb, but the jaw angles away form the stock - the fix is a better angle of the head but canting the gun over can get the same effect.


All that said, if you are happy with the way shoot with the gun then keep at it, in my case shooting is all about fun, I'm never going to be good enough to worry about the minutiae of shooting, just hitting a few clays in the company of mates is good enough for me.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I try not to analyse shots too much, too much thought going in (a result of too much time) results in a bird missed. I prefere sporting layouts and try to start with the gun dismounted, it cuts down the time I have to think and forces me into reacting to the bird more naturally. The result then tends to be a hit.
On clays this tends to get me a hit, miss then lots of hits until about bird 9 or 10 when the pressure builds and I start to think about it again!
The second shot as a miss is usually because I haven't taken the gun from the shoulder for the second bird, break and relay just like the RAC gunnery school!
 
Skeetstar, thank you very much for your help. I have done the eye dominance check several times and every time I have come out right eye dominant.

However, I may have fixed my problem. As I said last time, I had a good day (for me) with 35 /50 but I was canting the gun to get the middle and endsight lined up.

Well I purchased some red Beretta sights as I liked how they looked. Whilst fitting the sights, I decided to remove the mid sight and see how I got on.
Whilst bringing the gun up several times, I noted that the end sight lined up with the rib and I wasn’t canting the gun.
I fired today and had another good day today on difficult clays.

I think that subconsiously I have been concentrating on the mid sight due to my experience and time shooting rifles. And this has been affecting how I bring the gun up to my shoulder. The gun seems to fit better, I know it sounds wierd but it just seems to fit me better by removing the mid bead.

I’ll leave the mid sight off and see how it goes.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Frankly the beads on a shotgun are a gimic and shouldn't be there. I do my best work by ignoring them completely. You should really not focus on anything other than the clay or bird, the mounting of the gun is the most important thing and shotgun sights are there for your confidence.
I see chaps with big optical things on their guns, if it helps them fine, they are usually ones with a problem hitting anything at all!
Do I use a bead? On my game gun I don't. I actually have a long fibre optic bead, this I find useful in wooded country as I want a little dot to be visible subconsciously just out of focus to reassure me that I have mounted the gun correctly!
I don't shoot any better with it than I do without it, its a reassurance. It works, I feel reassured when I hit things. Frankly on a sporting layout 50% is OK. When I set up a simple layout using two or three traps I usually get 100% because its repetitive and easy although most struggle to break 50% yet are OK on live birds.
I won't take it off as its a stick on bead!
 
That it is. No prizes for aesthetics but does what it says on the tin, and very well too.
 
I`ve recently been given Cogswell Harrison Avant Tout 12g ejector , I thought the barrels were fcuked so it would have been scrap but decided to try polishing the barrels with oil and a bronze brush and they are coming up great , it appears to have been plastic and lead and only mild corrosion, next step it to get the barrels re blacked and the woodwork re finished , the only thing I`m not sure about is how to clean up the action and trigger guard metal work , any ideas ? @Ravers @ugly
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I`ve recently been given Cogswell Harrison Avant Tout 12g ejector , I thought the barrels were fcuked so it would have been scrap but decided to try polishing the barrels with oil and a bronze brush and they are coming up great , it appears to have been plastic and lead and only mild corrosion, next step it to get the barrels re blacked and the woodwork re finished , the only thing I`m not sure about is how to clean up the action and trigger guard metal work , any ideas ? @Ravers @ugly
You have a few options.

Traditionally the furniture (that’s the trigger guard, top lever and forend iron) would be blued and the action lightly case hardened.

If there are any remnants of these original finishes it’s nice to leave them be and not go overboard with the cleaning / polishing.

Boiling on a stove with some soda powder will bring everything up nicely.

If all the original finish is gone then you can go for a shiny finish. A light going over with Autosol will do the trick.

Top tip: if you want the engraving / lettering to really stand out, give it a little hit with a can of black spray paint, then quickly wipe it off with a damp cloth before it dries.

The paint will get down into the engraving and make it really stand out.

It obviously goes without saying that you only want to be doing any of this with the metalwork off the wood.
 

Latest Threads

Top