Shotgun safety question

#1
Hi, just borrowed a Nikko 812. My ignorance probably shows,however I thought all shotguns applied safe mechanically when the opening lever is operated. This one doesn't. My question is do some shotguns have a completely independent safety and if not, is it sensible to put 200 cartridges through it tomorrow?

Many thanks.
 
P

PrinceAlbert

Guest
#2
The safety on my shotgun is either off, or on, depending on what I set it to.

It's fully manual, not automatic.
 
#3
Depends on what shotgun you have. Some have automatic safety some have auto. Familiarise yourself with whichever make/model you have and get used to it.
 
P

PrinceAlbert

Guest
#4
You shouldn't really need safety on a shotgun, as the gun should always be broken unless you're about to shoot.
 
#5
Hi, just borrowed a Nikko 812. My ignorance probably shows,however I thought all shotguns applied safe mechanically when the opening lever is operated. This one doesn't. My question is do some shotguns have a completely independent safety and if not, is it sensible to put 200 cartridges through it tomorrow?

Many thanks.
Frankly the safety is useless, if you are not about to fire the gun should be broken, if you are not going to fire unload. There is no requirement to apply safe.

Some guns safe automatically, some don't.
 
#6
Gents, my question is answered! Thank you so much. Where else could you pose a question and get such a rapid response!

Again, much obliged.
 
#9
On a side note the safety does have a role if you are using a semi given that the handling drills are more complex.
 
#10
And I thought there was no such thing as a stupid question...just never used a gun that doesn't automatically apply safe. My reg guns (yeoman and silver pigeon) do. Loanee is travelling.

Again, thanks all.
 
#11
Breaking the gun is best practice, however there are times (particularly when walking-up game) when the safety catch is the only realistic option. In addition, and for a belt and braces approach one should apply the safety before moving the gun off the shoulder to break the gun.

Arguably just as many guns have the safety apply automatically as part of breaking the action as do not. So long as you have been assured by the owner that the gun has always been fully manual you are good to go. The important thing is to get it drilled in to you that this is the case.
 
#12
Pumps and Semi's don't break which is why most clubs and shoots don't like them.
Most safety's are a bit poxy anyway so I tend to err on breaking and or unloading if not actually shooting.
 
#13
Pumps and Semi's don't break which is why most clubs and shoots don't like them.
Most safety's are a bit poxy anyway so I tend to err on breaking and or unloading if not actually shooting.
A breech flag isn't expensive, if the flag isn't in it's ready to rock and roll.
 
#14
All, many thanks again for replies. I was just concerned that if this was not normal it may be indicative of a more serious issue. I feel comfortable with a manual safety, just never experienced it before.

Thanks all.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#15
I wouldnt worry, I had a 28 bore silver pigeon that had a manual only safety, a factory option basically means leaving a small bar out of the mechanism. I used it well and sadly sold it telling the buyer about the safety and he was ok with it.
I do own a CZ rifle where the safety is back to front and its standard on the 527 models. Its all about knowing the weapon and being familiar!
 
#16
Basically, as other posters have touched upon but not explained why, Over & Under shotguns (more so than Side By Sides) tend to either be designated for GAME or SPORTING use. Game guns will have a thinner rib (the bit you look down to acquire a target), with a small brass bead at the tip of the rib. Sporting guns tend to have a thicker, often ventilated rib (you're putting more shot through them at a greater rate when clay shooting) to keep the barrels cooler. The sporting gun will often have a Hi-Viz style bead at the end for greater clarity when acquiring targets (fast moving clays, not dirty great pheasants).

Anyway, on the safety. a GAME gun will generally have an AUTOMATIC safety, which engages after closing the barrels and need to be disengaged before firing. This is so the tweed brigade don't shoot each other in the arrse by accident every time they trip over or stumble, as after several sloe gins, one can become a tad forgetful, what!

On a SPORTING gun where you're rapidly reloading and taking a further pair of shots in quick succession, this AUTO safety would become totally nauseating, and cause a lot of missed 'birds' by the shooter forgetting to disengage. Therefore a SPORTER is ready to fire as soon as the gun is closed, for convenience, and speed. It is also assumed that the 'vest & baseball cap brigade' will have their gun pointed safely downrange at any time they're on the stand and shooting, as opposed to pointing at Quentin's ankles/a Spaniel.

Hope this helps.
 
#17
On the subject of Shotgun Safety (sorry to hijack the thread OP)...

I tend to favour pump action, semi automatic, and lastly O/U shotguns. (I wouldn't be seen dead with a SbS)

On using these types of guns at clay shoots I have encountered disparaging looks, and even comments by one particularly obnoxious fat prick when un-sleeving my black, semi auto or pump action.

Having handled all manner of guns from an early age I pride myself on my obsessive safety and cautiousness. I would be more than confident that whatever gun I take, I never pose any danger to anyone, much less than some of the berks I see with their thousands of pounds worth of gear, who have taken up the sport since they were shamed and blackballed for trying a pissed up grope of 'Mandy' the barmaid at the golf club.

In fact a pump action is in my opinion the safest format a shotgun can take. It is quite feasible to load 2 cartridges in the magazine tube, leaving the chamber clear, and only 'rack' the gun when a cartridge is needed. This enables you to carry a totally safe, loaded gun, which can't be accidentally loaded (unless you had some mad-ass Parkinsons shakes!)

What's the view of the wider ARRSE community on this topic, and "Is it just me?"
 
#18
You may well be a safe weapons handler, the problem is - I don't know that. Seeing someone with a semi without a breech flag I have to assume it's loaded. Even if the working parts are to the rear doesn't mean the gun is safe.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#19
I have a lovely Ithaca 37 8 shot wich is good fun on a DTL layout but as its bottom feed and eject it comes out quite rarely. I use it on pigeons and for piggies (given the chance) its a crop protection tool!
 
#20
You may well be a safe weapons handler, the problem is - I don't know that. Seeing someone with a semi without a breech flag I have to assume it's loaded. Even if the working parts are to the rear doesn't mean the gun is safe.

I dunno, almost 40 and I still find things like this amusing.

I blame growing up in the 70's and 80's watching all those Carry On Films!

(And you're quite right CQMS.)
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top