Shotgun cartridges - laws on finding them

#1
Hi guys,

My wife works for a Wildlife Trust and recently they have been finding live shotgun cartdriges in a car park on on of their sites. They are obviously being dropped by one of the local shooters (a number have permission to shoot there).

I've been asked what to do with them, I've given them a quick run down on safety and storage, but I am unsure on the legal side of picking up, storage and disposal. No-one at the trust has a licence for firearms of any type so what should they do with them? I've pointed them towards the Police for help, but thought you guys could help out in quicker time.

Thanks

S_R
 
#2
Contact your local control room, non emergency number, google/yell, etc. They'll create and incident and your beat officer can collect for disposal
 
#6
#8
The job won't cause any problems over collecting the shells and as he's asking on behalf of wife/wildlife centre, chances are they'll already know their local officer. Collection is a simple task and despite what others say, no reason to cause any problems. Beat officer can kill 2 birds with one stone and give prevention advice as poster states it's a reoccuring theme!
 
#9
England, Scotland & Wales: no legal authority or good reason required to possess or store. You can't sell them on unless you know that the buyer is not a prohibited person, in law - in practice, this means for all intents and purposes, they'll have to have a SGC (Shotgun Certificate).

So, you can safely take them and keep them, bin them, hand them to the plod or just ignore them. They are much safer than centre fire ammo; if initiated (outside of a barrel) they will simply pop open, although the primer cap going off may make you jump.

If you're in NI, leave them the fuck alone (after you've removed your dabs if you've touched them).
 
#10
pegasus797 said:
The job won't cause any problems over collecting the shells and as he's asking on behalf of wife/wildlife centre, chances are they'll already know their local officer. Collection is a simple task and despite what others say, no reason to cause any problems. Beat officer can kill 2 birds with one stone and give prevention advice as poster states it's a reoccuring theme!
Hope that is the case. But I can tell you of somebody who had a very bad time indeed just because the binmen spotted some discharged shotshells he had taken home and put in his rubbish bin rather than leave them in the field.

Common sense does not always prevail.
 
#11
Stop, Stop, Stop al!!!!!!!!!l It is against the law to tamper with loaded ammo. It is legal to posses but not to buy if you dont have a Shot gun cert. Just find some one who shoots and give them tot hem and they will put them down the range.

Dave
 
#12
Where's the common sense in putting live ammo in the bin?
 
#13
The law on finding cartridges is that you find them immediately after the thing you wanted to shoot at has passed you and your unloaded, broken gat. The exception that proves the rule is that you find a cartridge in time but it is of either an inappropriate calibre or load...
 
#14
Devilishdave said:
Stop, Stop, Stop al!!!!!!!!!l It is against the law to tamper with loaded ammo. It is legal to posses but not to buy if you dont have a Shot gun cert. Just find some one who shoots and give them tot hem and they will put them down the range.

Dave
That was changed a few years ago as I recall but I don't have the reference to hand.

That said, it's not advisable anyway unless you know what you are doing.
 
#15
What ever you do, DO NOT involve plod. Almost all of them have a very basic understanding of gun law. And they won't give you the benifit of the doubt, they'll charge you with something-anything then ask questions later. By then it'll have gathered too much momentum to be a mistake and it'll cost you a fortune to clear your name.
Seen it too many times unfortunately.
 
#16
S-mise. Thanks for your indepth pearls of wisdom. He was asking for sound advice, not random musings care of your magic 8 ball. It's already been seen that possession without licence is not an offence, so how is this going to escalate?
 
#17
pegasus797 said:
S-mise. Thanks for your indepth pearls of wisdom. He was asking for sound advice, not random musings care of your magic 8 ball. It's already been seen that possession without licence is not an offence, so how is this going to escalate?
Mick Shepherd spent twelve months on remand before being found not guilty after The Met decided they needed to make a show trial to detract from their p ss poor performance in apprehending criminals. The fact that he had committed no offence did not stop him spending a year in prison on made up firearms charges that never held water. I wouldn't involve the police if I was in the OP's position.
 
#18
One of the guys at my old shoot was stopped driving home from our duck pond a few years back. Plod knew where he had been and what he had been doing. Shooting at our pond. He had his gun and dogs in the back of the car and half a box of cartriges in his shooting jacket which he was wearing. They breathalized him (negative) then let him go. My mate on his merry way again swung in past the local garage to buy some fags and guess who was waiting at the door for him?
I can't remember what they charged him with, but walking around in public places with shotgun cartriges is a no-no apparently. Lost his cert and his hobby.

As above in another post I know of another guy who had gathered up all his empties after an excellent afternoon at the woodies and dumped them in the bin. When the bin men saw them they called good old plod and guess what? He got in trouble. The guy is in his teens and narrowly kept his cert.

The law is the law depending many more factors than just the law.
 
#19
There's a difference between being found in possession and having to explain (we do make mistakes, selection doesn't get rid of the idiots, there are loads of them and all seem to be in my force!?!) and volunteering them over, that's why my original post said to give the contact centre a call first, they can either advise or arrange for collection.
 
#20
pegasus797 said:
S-mise. Thanks for your indepth pearls of wisdom. He was asking for sound advice, not random musings
OK hear is some sound advice then.

In my opinion, based on many years of firearms ownership, never go to the police for advice on firearms matters except as a last resort.
 

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