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Builds Short Sunderland Mklll 1.72 scale with Eduard PE maintenance platform

the tip of the engine housing/shroud appears to be bronze or brass, getting that to look scale is a messy business with paint mixed in a coke can bottom, thinners, matt black and gold, several light coats to get a weathered brass look.
brass engine shrounds a.png

the burned engine will get soot and rust to simulate burned and overheated baffle plates and melted ducting.
brass engine shrouds b.png
 
getting the sooting deposit from the engine fire, starting with a light coat of burned black, the darker shades will go in toward the center where the flames caused heavier deposits, with the outer shades being lighter as they were dispersed.
initial black sooting.png

I'll let each shade dry and harden before the next is applied.
initial black sooting overview.png
 
Streaks of fire extinguisher residue running to the trailing edge and spotting onto the tail? I have visions of a homemade wind tunnel to get the effect just right...
 
Streaks of fire extinguisher residue running to the trailing edge and spotting onto the tail? I have visions of a homemade wind tunnel to get the effect just right...

got any reference pics? it may be the co2 or foam extinguisher doesn't stick during the fire in trhe slipstream. don't know, have to do some googling.

The burned blackened exhaust pipes, soon be time for some PE drop down maintenance platforms.
blackened exhaust.png
 
Just recording this in case I want to refer back to it...

2:14 in the following clip, although the extinguisher isn't supposed to be working...

I'd always thought that the extinguishant was some sort of foam but I keep being faced with carbon tetrachloride or bromine - and I can't see how a gas is going to work in a 300mph wind.
 
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"Narrative:
The no. 3 engine caught fire and fell out. A ditching was attempted but the Sunderland overturned."

Maybe lose the engine altogether?
 

"Narrative:
The no. 3 engine caught fire and fell out. A ditching was attempted but the Sunderland overturned."

Maybe lose the engine altogether?
no I'm not losing the engine altogether after all this work, besides, the engine fire was a reason to point at the service platforms in use, the evidence of an engine fire providing a explanation rather than routine servicing a lot of viewers may not consider, much less understand.
 
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I'm just starting to wonder whether any Sunderlands that suffered an engine fire ever made it back into the air (assuming they managed to get down safely). The heat must have caused severe structural damage. Would you not be better off just having a catastrophic oil leak?
 
I'm just starting to wonder whether any Sunderlands that suffered an engine fire ever made it back into the air (assuming they managed to get down safely). The heat must have caused severe structural damage. Would you not be better off just having a catastrophic oil leak?

I would have thought replacing the engine and housing or even a wing would have been more encouraged than losing the whole thing. I don't know though, it's an interesting question.
 
I would have thought replacing the engine and housing or even a wing would have been more encouraged than losing the whole thing. I don't know though, it's an interesting question.
If I read this correctly, 173 accidents, 173 write-offs:

If I'd been a Sunderland pilot, I don't think my morale would be boosted by knowing that the local ground crew had either fitted a wing that had been road-transported from Leeds or decided that the charred wing spar looked good enough to them. I'd want a new aeroplane or at least one whose structural members hadn't been in a fire. Those wing floats must put a lot of strain on the wing.

173/173 doesn't make it a dangerous aircraft, just that it's easy to put it beyond economic repair. Probably why you don't see many of them flying about these days.
 
Right, been through the list of Sunderland accidents (including shoot-downs). None were repaired. 7 were attributed to engine fires.

7.9.42 W3927. #1 engine caught fire, crashed on landing.

30.9.42 T9050. "Engine fire". Stalled, crashed.

26.11.42 DD851. "Engine fire". Engine fell off, crashed.

5.11.43 G-AGIB. #4 engine caught fire causing wing to break, crashed.

20.4.45 DD855. Fire port outer engine then wing fell off after landing, then sank.

21.10.47 DV976. #3 engine fire. Engine fell out, overturned on landing.

30.1.54 RN290. "Engine fire". Float broke off when landing. Burnt out.


Interestingly - 26.9.46 SZ564 was written off when it slipped off its beaching trolley at Kai Tak.
 
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