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Builds Short Sunderland Mklll 1.72 scale with Eduard PE maintenance platform

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I can grasp the concept of white glue drying clear (though I've no idea what sort of white glue it is) but can't come to grips with how you hold the glue in place in a big hole until it cures.

I take it that you won't be using a similar technique for the cockpit windows.
White glue or to give it's correct name, PVA (Polyvinyl Acetate) Glue is available from most craft and diy outlets. While excellent for glueing wood, card and paper, it has limited used with plastics and resins. Like all things, you get good and bad varieties. I tend to use Titebond, which is an alyphatic resin glue, which when dried, tends to look like urine stains. Great for glueing up plywood and polystyrene for dioramas.
Evo-stik do a good pva as do B&Q. I tend to steer away from "craft" pva's as they are watered down. I have used dried pva for making headlight lens', filling dashboards and glueing vehicle windscreens. Mixed with plastic sawdust it makes a good gap filler. Hope this helps.
To make Windows or lens', use a template on a clean flat surface and drop the glue into it. Once it has dried clear, insert into the orifice of choice (ooh err). Alternatively, hold the model flat and drop the glue in place. The Model will need to be kept flat until the glue sets.
White glue is great for making artificial bogies with. Simply put a drop on your hand and keep rubbing it until it forms a rubbery lump. Attach to nostril and sit in a pub or restaurant. It's amazing how many people look at it but don't tell you that you have a large snotter hanging from your nose.
 
Is the plastic not clear enough? You can see bubble lines in a couple of the glued portholes which would bother me more than the non glass plastic look.

You can sand them off. If you have a look at my Spad build, I did a canopy clean up, so you can see what you can achieve with plastic with a bit of elbow grease
 
Is the plastic not clear enough? You can see bubble lines in a couple of the glued portholes which would bother me more than the non glass plastic look.
the kit porthole windows are not that great, they have a pinch in the middle that shows up when viewed from a distance.
kit glazing a.png


kit glazing b.png

they have to be assembled from inside, so If you mess one up there's no going back once the fuselage is together, as it can't be reached, and they'd need masking when the exterior is spray painted.
by using PVA glue I can place them from outside once the painting is done, if one shows up with an imperfection, as you noted, they can simply be removed with a pointed blade modelling knife and redone.
porthole glass f png.png

these will need a slight covering of green Algy at the edges.
 
I can grasp the concept of white glue drying clear (though I've no idea what sort of white glue it is) but can't come to grips with how you hold the glue in place in a big hole until it cures.

I take it that you won't be using a similar technique for the cockpit windows.

no of course not. the cockpit canopy from the kit will be used, I'm masking it up for airbrushing here.
cockpit canopy masked a.png

but it struck me, why not cut out the framing lines in Tamiya masking tape, paint them and apply them over the glazing like real frames, I'll try it, once the primary panels in the gun turrets are painted.
cockpit canopy masked b.png
 
the tape method seems to be working, the tape takes paint easier than the clear plastic, I may have stumbled on something that works for me, plus the tape makes the edges of the gun turret framing far better defined, I'll continue with this and finish all three gun turrets with this, then give it a final coat of paint.
tamiya tape gun turret frames.png
 
Will the tape peel off as the adhesive ages?

The lack of clarity on the "Perspex" can be explained away as condensation or ice.
 
Will the tape peel off as the adhesive ages?

The lack of clarity on the "Perspex" can be explained away as condensation or ice.

A= No, I have Tamiya masking tape still on things from years ago, the adhesive if not removed within a few days goes all glue like and permanent, so don't leave it on things unless you want it to stay.

B+= great idea, condensation would help the algae grow.
 
A= No, I have Tamiya masking tape still on things from years ago, the adhesive if not removed within a few days goes all glue like and permanent, so don't leave it on things unless you want it to stay.

B+= great idea, condensation would help the algae grow.
That’s interesting to know about the tape, some of Dads larger figures the webbings starting to peel.
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
I didn’t know until recently that the axes of Sunderland engines are not exactly in line with the axis of the fuselage.
The hull and wing were developed from the Empire boat, but it was found that the centre of gravity had moved aft quite significantly. This was countered by adding spacers in the spars which swept the wings backwards by about 4 or 5 degrees, and the engines were thus pulling slightly outwards.
 
I didn’t know until recently that the axes of Sunderland engines are not exactly in line with the axis of the fuselage.
The hull and wing were developed from the Empire boat, but it was found that the centre of gravity had moved aft quite significantly. This was countered by adding spacers in the spars which swept the wings backwards by about 4 or 5 degrees, and the engines were thus pulling slightly outwards.
It seems that it wasn't unusual. The Ju-52 had the same arrangement with engines 1 & 3 angled outwards.

1600761608161.png
 
The Ju-52 had the same arrangement with engines 1 & 3 angled outwards.
Could it be to throw the prop wash over the tail control surfaces, perhaps reducing the drag that would come from a twin rudder design?
 

LARD

LE
Tamiya masking tape? or painters and decorators?


I've just been thinking - IIRC there used to be some lining tapes marketed back in the 70's especially for this purpose. Never used the stuff myself, but the maker was someone like Mekpak I think.
 
Could it be to throw the prop wash over the tail control surfaces, perhaps reducing the drag that would come from a twin rudder design?


With the Sunderland I believe it was due to a design change altering the centre of gravity and the wings alignment was altered but not the engine alignment

Back home and checked - wings altered by 4.25 degrees to counteract the the weight of turrets and military equipment which moved the CofG back.
 
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large tail numbers made by dry transfer letra set, the roundall is from the kit decals. 201 Sqn RAF Coastal command.
This build is unbelievably slow, I'm spending a lot of spare time elsewhere, but I'll keep the slow progress updates coming.
dry transfer letters.png
 

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