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Builds Short Sunderland Mklll 1.72 scale with Eduard PE maintenance platform

Oyibo

LE
Cheers Si, I am, though aircraft aren't my usual forte, this one turned out how I visualised it. Working in 1/72 scale can get super fiddley, and with such a large subject, space on a diorama gets tight, or you can end up with a base size that's too large. even if I got a bigger drinks cabinet. Still, it's going to Tangmere on Monday next week so I'll have some space back for a new model project.
View attachment 512167

Massive thread drift - Is that a 15 PARA DZ Flash in the background?

Great work on the plane BTW
 
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(Worked through other parts of the link, specifically Part 9, provided by Sprocket in post #304).

Chain to spreader beam to chains to lifting points. Not strops. Presumably there is some sort of trolley waiting which has a frame with engine mounting bolts.

That wasn't what I was searching for though. I was looking for the means of access to the top of the wing. Obviously, on land, it would be a simple matter of propping a ladder against the wing but on water it wouldn't be so simple. Was there a hatch in the roof of the aircraft? I can't find evidence of there being one in photographs. Was there an opening panel in the cockpit canopy? Maybe access through the turret? Whatever method was used must have been simple (so that rules out crawling inside the wing to the maintenance panels) as accessing the engines was a daily chore.

ETA

I may have found evidence of a roof hatch.
avsund_3.jpg
 
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1741904_20120830Vinci11.jpg

...a frame similar to this, maybe?

This is a Shackleton engine used to test cladding. Many a happy time...
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Quite apart from the astonishing modelling, this thread has been superb in terms of gaining a real understanding of what it actually took get the RAF into the air and able to fight. The books may talk about 1,000 bomber raids but they never quite capture what a mammoth and very skilled technical and maintenance effort backed it all up.
 
View attachment 512238

(Worked through other parts of the link, specifically Part 9, provided by Sprocket in post #304).

Chain to spreader beam to chains to lifting points. Not strops. Presumably there is some sort of trolley waiting which has a frame with engine mounting bolts.

That wasn't what I was searching for though. I was looking for the means of access to the top of the wing. Obviously, on land, it would be a simple matter of propping a ladder against the wing but on water it wouldn't be so simple. Was there a hatch in the roof of the aircraft? I can't find evidence of there being one in photographs. Was there an opening panel in the cockpit canopy? Maybe access through the turret? Whatever method was used must have been simple (so that rules out crawling inside the wing to the maintenance panels) as accessing the engines was a daily chore.

ETA

I may have found evidence of a roof hatch.
View attachment 512240
A couple of options spring to mind. Firstly, take a ladder in the dinghy to the plane, when arriving at plane put the ladder on top of the wing sponson. This is then held by a trusted workmate while you climb up onto the wing, repeat as necessary. The other option, and more likely: the nominated person hangs from the spreader beam of the engine hoist and is craned across to the top of the wing whilst trying not to fall in the water. Plenty of opportunities for banter and hi-jinx from mates and the crane oppo.
 
spent a busy evening last night, assembling the panes of glass into the dome, here it is trial fitted over the base, it's rather ....large
glass case a.png

glass case b.png


the aircrew figures half painted, awaiting a touch in before they are de-based and glued to the slipway to the side of the nose.
air crew.png
 
here are the guys shooting the breeze, de-stressing the old fashioned way, by talking to your mates.
air crew on the slipway.png

the final view of the model in it's glass case, bonded down and finished.
final picture.png
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
here are the guys shooting the breeze, de-stressing the old fashioned way, by talking to your mates.
View attachment 512691
the final view of the model in it's glass case, bonded down and finished.
View attachment 512692

A really quite splendid piece or work and it's been a privilege to watch it take shape.

Suggestion on future domes though - how about making the bit that goes from front to the back of the display out of four/five panels rather than three so you can view the model from 45 degrees without a join line through the middle?
 
This has been a cracking thread, I've followed it all the way through and I've sent the link to it to all of my modelling friends (one of whom remembers this model as the first his dad ever bought him and got quite dusty eyed about it).

It's been a real pleasure to see how you've created an excellent piece of work.

Well done
 
As one who hasn't made a model since my school days, I would like to say how much I enjoy these threads. I bow to no man in my admiration for the skills on display by Sprocket, Simmeritt et al. Thank you.
 
A really quite splendid piece or work and it's been a privilege to watch it take shape.

Suggestion on future domes though - how about making the bit that goes from front to the back of the display out of four/five panels rather than three so you can view the model from 45 degrees without a join line through the middle?
thank you, it's been a journey, and I'm pleased that some have trod along with me. Your idea would be great if it worked, anything to cut the glass dome volume down. It's not the sides so much as the top piece, cutting glass at right angles is within the bounds of my glass supplier, anyway, the vast areas of grey either side of the model have inadvertently suggested the vast grey inhospitable ocean, the men who flew these ops had to traverse, I raise a glass of beer to them all, Cheers guys.
 

Chef

LE
thank you, it's been a journey, and I'm pleased that some have trod along with me. Your idea would be great if it worked, anything to cut the glass dome volume down. It's not the sides so much as the top piece, cutting glass at right angles is within the bounds of my glass supplier, anyway, the vast areas of grey either side of the model have inadvertently suggested the vast grey inhospitable ocean, the men who flew these ops had to traverse, I raise a glass of beer to them all, Cheers guys.

I'm sure you've already considered it but with a large aircraft like this one would it have worked to have the wings diagonal to the box? It would reduce the amount of glass needed.

As has been said before thanks to you and the other skilled modellers for sharing your work here. It's a delight to watch these builds progress.
 
here are the guys shooting the breeze, de-stressing the old fashioned way, by talking to your mates.
View attachment 512691
the final view of the model in it's glass case, bonded down and finished.
View attachment 512692

Fantastic piece of work mate. Time to ask the question 'what's it worth for the museum sale price?'

I'd say comfortably a couple of hundred notes.
 
the vast areas of grey either side of the model have inadvertently suggested the vast grey inhospitable ocean, the men who flew these ops had to traverse, I raise a glass of beer to them all,
I've just read this. "Dark sky, deep water"
1602956888997.png

Horrifying.

Thoroughly recommended.
 
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