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Builds Short Sunderland Mklll 1.72 scale with Eduard PE maintenance platform

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The Airfix kit of this Classic piece of British aviation, has been surpassed by other kits, but I'll face the challenge of doing it up as best I can. It will look battered and war worn, the weathering will form the most eye catching aspect of this build, plus, the maintenance platforms around a stripped engine, maybe after an engine fire. So it'll be on wheels on concrete, rather than as a waterline model or one depicted in flight. Lets take a look in the box.
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the eduard set.
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I never got around to making a Sunderland. Or the Stirling for that matter. My tastes had changed by the time I had enough pocket money.
 
Really looking forward to this one.

Have you finished yet?
 

Oyibo

LE
Love that plane. Do it justice
 
first step, cutting with a hobby/mini saw the leading edge of the port wing.
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problem number one, the wing lights encroach inside the removable panels, that will need re-building to fix the straight edge. The lamp housing has suffered a miss-alignment.
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four openings into the leading edge, oddly the pe kit does not provide for the front edge of the fuel tanks beyond.
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plasticard blanks off the dark spaces beyond,Mr surfacer grey liquid model filler placed on the cut edges to be sanded smooth when it dries and goes hard. The PE kit does provide the machine edges of the wing openings
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Love that plane. Do it justice


My mothers late brother was flight crew on Sunderland's, far eastern command. many moons ago I bought 2 pewter models mounted on a triangular polished base, and presented one to him, my own one sits proudly with my other pewter figurines on our TV cabinet.. Visitors always comment on the Sunderland. I think that after the spitfire, it is the most iconic and graceful of all the aircraft that served in WW2.
 

Oyibo

LE
My mothers late brother was flight crew on Sunderland's, far eastern command. many moons ago I bought 2 pewter models mounted on a triangular polished base, and presented one to him, my own one sits proudly with my other pewter figurines on our TV cabinet.. Visitors always comment on the Sunderland. I think that after the spitfire, it is the most iconic and graceful of all the aircraft that served in WW2.

TV cabinet??? Do you live in a museum? :-D
 
For an early 60's kit I think it stands up well. Looks right when built and that's good enough for me. Surprised your reboxing doesn't have the original Roy Cross art work.
 
TV cabinet??? Do you live in a museum? :-D


Its a relic of the old cathode ray tube TV.s, we used to have in the stone age. Dark mahogany with brass fittings large enough to house a 32in flat screen TV, when switched off, the doors fold close, handy when we have visitors. talking and banter is preferable to watching the constant dross. It also matches the bookcases, and sideboard, And complements the dark red leather chesterfield sofas and club chairs. Very old fashioned, I know. The other TV,s in the house (4) are all free standing flat screen. Our very large living room (500 Sq Ft) has been likened to an Edwardian gentlemans club. Complete with bang sticks sharp pointy things, and pictures portraits and other things on the walls.
A free standing large flat screen TV would look very out of place...... Now you know.;)
 
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There are several coffee table books of his art. I have the first.
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Sunderland is in it but only as one of the also-rans to the obvious art.
Bottom of page 72.

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Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Its a relic of the old cathode ray tube TV.s, we used to have in the stone age. Dark mahogany with brass fittings large enough to house a 32in flat screen TV, when switched off, the doors fold close, handy when we have visitors. talking and banter is preferable to watching the constant dross. It also matches the bookcases, and sideboard, And complements the dark red leather chesterfield sofas and club chairs. Very old fashioned, I know. The other TV,s in the house (4) are all free standing flat screen. Our very large living room (500 Sq Ft) has been likened to an Edwardian gentleman club. Complete with bang sticks sharp pointy things, and pictures portraits and other things on the walls.
A free standing large flat screen TV would look very out of place...... Now you know.;)
I'm marvelling at the sheer awfulness of it all.
 

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