Shooting Season 2018 / 19

#64
Men's Upland Hunting Clothing : Cabela's


Let me introduce you to Cabelas. A fortune could be made over your way.
Aaaaand here's your average Cabela's customer. Most shoots in the UK insist on a a full orthodontic check before allowing you on a peg. I think the fella on the left might also have an issue with eye dominance :p

rednecks-with-guns.jpg
 

Ravers

LE
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#66
Men's Upland Hunting Clothing : Cabela's


Let me introduce you to Cabelas. A fortune could be made over your way.
You’d be laughed at and then sent home if you turned up to a British shoot in any of that red neck shit.

That’s got V8 pick up driving, banjo playing, cousin *******, fried chicken out of a bucket eating, trump voter written all over it.
 
#68
You’d be laughed at and then sent home if you turned up to a British shoot in any of that red neck shit.

That’s got V8 pick up driving, banjo playing, cousin *******, fried chicken out of a bucket eating, trump voter written all over it.
I just don’t understand your aversion to trucks and fried chicken.

To be quite honest your version of hunting seems to be more of a ritualized gathering with little flexibility, and more akin to a canned hunt with paths for the shooters to follow. It’s more like skeet shooting with live clays. I guess that is why it is called “shooting” over your way. Roles for all participants are clearly defined, while over here everyone does it all fluidly. It would be easier for an American hunter to transition to your style then vice versa me thinks.
 

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#70
I just don’t understand your aversion to trucks and fried chicken.

To be quite honest your version of hunting seems to be more of a ritualized gathering with little flexibility, and more akin to a canned hunt with paths for the shooters to follow. It’s more like skeet shooting with live clays. I guess that is why it is called “shooting” over your way. Roles for all participants are clearly defined, while over here everyone does it all fluidly. It would be easier for an American hunter to transition to your style then vice versa me thinks.
We have hunting as per what you guys do in the UK too, but it’s very different to driven shooting.

Walked up shooting is very similar to what you have over there. Driven shooting is basically the high end of shooting. It’s the most expensive way to shoot and is generally seen as a luxury. Many people will only go once a year because of the cost. Hence why people dress up for it. It’s about the whole day, the social aspect, the food, the drink. Killing birds isn’t the whole deal like American “hunting.”

You’re right though it is like clay shooting but with real birds when compared to walk up shooting.

We also do a lot of “hide” shooting where you sit in a camouflaged hide and shoot pigeons and / or crows. This is primarily for pest control though. For this you just wear whatever is comfortable and most people use an auto or pump action shotgun.

You’d be surprised how comfortable and practical tweed is. Our clothing has evolved like that for a reason. The tweed offers a smart version of camouflage that works just as well. It’s also very hard wearing. You gotta remember it rains here all the time, so a wax jacket is fairly crucial, as are wellies, hence why plus fours (breeks) are popular because they’re more comfortable with wellies. Also the type of shooting we do means you generally spend a lot of time stood around in the cold. Freedom of movement is less important than being warm and dry.

The link I posted above is pretty much the most expensive gear you can get. Very few people actually pay 150 quid for a pair of socks. As a rule I don’t scrimp on a good coat and boots. This generally pays off. My Purdey shooting coat (RRP 800ish quid) is 10 years old now and good as new. Everything else I just get from the cheaper places. Shirts, breeks, socks etc.

Generally if you look at Purdey or Holland & Holland’s catalogue, you’ll see a style you like and then be able to copy it with cheaper gear that looks similar.

Men's Country Clothing | Men's Equestrian Clothing | Rydale
 
#72
We have hunting as per what you guys do in the UK too, but it’s very different to driven shooting.

Walked up shooting is very similar to what you have over there. Driven shooting is basically the high end of shooting. It’s the most expensive way to shoot and is generally seen as a luxury. Many people will only go once a year because of the cost. Hence why people dress up for it. It’s about the whole day, the social aspect, the food, the drink. Killing birds isn’t the whole deal like American “hunting.”

You’re right though it is like clay shooting but with real birds when compared to walk up shooting.

We also do a lot of “hide” shooting where you sit in a camouflaged hide and shoot pigeons and / or crows. This is primarily for pest control though. For this you just wear whatever is comfortable and most people use an auto or pump action shotgun.

You’d be surprised how comfortable and practical tweed is. Our clothing has evolved like that for a reason. The tweed offers a smart version of camouflage that works just as well. It’s also very hard wearing. You gotta remember it rains here all the time, so a wax jacket is fairly crucial, as are wellies, hence why plus fours (breeks) are popular because they’re more comfortable with wellies. Also the type of shooting we do means you generally spend a lot of time stood around in the cold. Freedom of movement is less important than being warm and dry.

The link I posted above is pretty much the most expensive gear you can get. Very few people actually pay 150 quid for a pair of socks. As a rule I don’t scrimp on a good coat and boots. This generally pays off. My Purdey shooting coat (RRP 800ish quid) is 10 years old now and good as new. Everything else I just get from the cheaper places. Shirts, breeks, socks etc.

Generally if you look at Purdey or Holland & Holland’s catalogue, you’ll see a style you like and then be able to copy it with cheaper gear that looks similar.

Men's Country Clothing | Men's Equestrian Clothing | Rydale
I can see the once a year aspect. I have a lifetime license and conservation stamp that the parents got me a long time ago as a gift. I do pay $12.50 for the Springer Stamp which keeps the game bird farms here running. Aside from Gas/Shells/Snacks and lunch it is def cheaper here as long as you have all the other required kit.

Killing birds is not everything here either, but it is a nice plus. Hunting here is just really personal time with family and close mates away from the wives. We do have our own rituals, but most of the bullshitting occurs in the parking lot before hunting and at the local dive for brunch/lunch.

You do get more rain, because it is either fairly decent or snowing and cold come the end of October, November, and December. Granted I do tend to dress in layers during the beginning of the season for comfort.

Now do you still have the beaters and the whole cast of supporting staff when it comes to walked up shooting?
 
#74
Is this your first day of school outfit?? The tie is barbaric sir, who the hell wears a tie to shoot pheasant birds?
You should see what he wears in the office... The monocle and pocket watch are impressive to the peasants though.
 

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LE
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#75
Now do you still have the beaters and the whole cast of supporting staff when it comes to walked up shooting?
Nope.

It’s basically the same as what you do. A few blokes (or sometimes just one) going for a walk in the countryside with a dog and a gun and shooting whatever comes up.

As long as you have a shotgun licence (lawful permission to own a shotgun) and permission to shoot on the land, it’s generally free.

However walked up shooting is something that needs to be done carefully for a various reasons.

1. The UK doesn’t have as much open space as the US. You are much more likely to encounter other people. Even on private land there are usually public footpaths going through. Obviously there are safety issues with this and also the fact that a lot of people’s first reaction when seeing someone with a gun is to call the police.

2. Most birds here are reared for driven shooting. So if you’re shooting walked up game during the season (generally pheasants and partridges) you won’t be popular with the local driven shoot if you’re making a load of noise and scaring off all their birds. Invariably most of the birds that are shot on walked up shoots are wanderers from driven shoots. We do not allow walked up shooting on our estate during the season because it adversely affects the driven shooting.

Having said that, sometimes walking up the boundaries of an estate is worthwhile as you can gently nudge birds back into the woods for the driven days, just bagging yourself a bird or two and letting the rest fly back. You’re almost trying to herd them back to where you want them.

We’ll do a bit at the end of the season to mop up any stragglers and off season I’m out most evenings walking up crows and pigeons (which are classed as vermin and can be shot at anytime of year in the UK).

Walked up grouse is a slightly different kettle of fish because it’s done on open moorland and the birds are wild.
 
#76
You should see what he wears in the office... The monocle and pocket watch are impressive to the peasants though.
Nope.

It’s basically the same as what you do. A few blokes (or sometimes just one) going for a walk in the countryside with a dog and a gun and shooting whatever comes up.

As long as you have a shotgun licence (lawful permission to own a shotgun) and permission to shoot on the land, it’s generally free.

However walked up shooting is something that needs to be done carefully for a various reasons.

1. The UK doesn’t have as much open space as the US. You are much more likely to encounter other people. Even on private land there are usually public footpaths going through. Obviously there are safety issues with this and also the fact that a lot of people’s first reaction when seeing someone with a gun is to call the police.

2. Most birds here are reared for driven shooting. So if you’re shooting walked up game during the season (generally pheasants and partridges) you won’t be popular with the local driven shoot if you’re making a load of noise and scaring off all their birds. Invariably most of the birds that are shot on walked up shoots are wanderers from driven shoots. We do not allow walked up shooting on our estate during the season because it adversely affects the driven shooting.

Having said that, sometimes walking up the boundaries of an estate is worthwhile as you can gently nudge birds back into the woods for the driven days, just bagging yourself a bird or two and letting the rest fly back. You’re almost trying to herd them back to where you want them.

We’ll do a bit at the end of the season to mop up any stragglers and off season I’m out most evenings walking up crows and pigeons (which are classed as vermin and can be shot at anytime of year in the UK).

Walked up grouse is a slightly different kettle of fish because it’s done on open moorland and the birds are wild.
1. Guns are a way of life here, so it is kinda sad that people would freak out over a person with a hunting shotgun in the boonies. I could understand the panic if they were in a Tesco and somebody walked in with a handgun strapped to their thigh and an AR slung over their shoulder (legal here btw).

Do you guys try to keep some survivors around to reproduce wild birds for the following year? The area where we hunt is a combination of farm birds and the survivors from prior years and their offspring.
 

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LE
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#77
That is quite the chunk of change for a Pheasant bird. I will stick to my $12.50 for the chance to kill state/wild birds.
65 quid a bird will include food, drink, transport and various other niceties for the day. And for that sort of cash we’re talking the very best hospitality, possibly even spending the night in a posh stately home or something. 65 quid is very much the top end (it can be triple that price for driven grouse though).

Most shoots hover around the 25-40 quid a bird mark. Again we’re usually still talking good food and drink thrown in.

Also you don’t actually pay for the birds that you shoot as an individual. So let’s say 10 of you decide to go on a 200 bird day at 40 quid a bird.

This will cost your entire party £8000 so £800 each for the day. This is paid by each man regardless of whether he hits 1 or 100 birds, it’s just luck of the draw. The shoot will do their very best to make sure your party shoots 200 birds between you. A good shoot should mix the drives up accordingly so if by lunchtime you’ve only shot 50 birds between you, they’ll make sure the drives after lunch are better ones with more birds (or easier birds if it looks like the reason for the low bag is because the guns are crap shots).

If you reach 200 before the end of the day, you may be given the option to pay a bit more for another drive but this is rare. A good shoot captain / gamekeeper team will be able to judge how the day is going and make it work. The perfect shoot should hit its 200th bird just as the last beater emerges from the woods on the last drive.

Other shoots operate on a more flexible basis and it’ll be around 200. They won’t mind if you go slightly over.

Of course there is a lot of money changing hands and there are occasional disagreements. It’s crucial that the gamekeeper keeps track of how many shots are fired using a click counter. Obviously if the guns kick off saying we paid for 200 birds but only shot 100, the game keeper can say “yeah but you fired 500 shots. The reason you didn’t get 200 birds is because you’re shit.”

Thankfully this is rare. It’s generally a very gentlemanly sport.

What I’ve described above is for commercial shooting. Other ways of doing it are as a syndicate where you pay a fee to join a shoot for a whole season, shooting as many birds as you want. There are DIY shoots run by farmers who might shoot one drive then beat the next, swapping with an opposite number.

I tend to mix it up a bit. We have a syndicate on our estate which I am a member of. I pay a fee for the whole season and that gives me a driven days shooting every Saturday throughout the season. I also do a few commercial days described above with friends and get invited to the odd farm shoot.
 

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LE
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#78
Do you guys try to keep some survivors around to reproduce wild birds for the following year? The area where we hunt is a combination of farm birds and the survivors from prior years and their offspring.
You can but it’s generally pointless. Most will die from the cold or get eaten by foxes.

Partridges have a 6% survival rate if left to fend for themselves. A bit better for pheasants but not much.
 
#79
65 quid a bird will include food, drink, transport and various other niceties for the day. And for that sort of cash we’re talking the very best hospitality, possibly even spending the night in a posh stately home or something. 65 quid is very much the top end (it can be triple that price for driven grouse though).

Most shoots hover around the 25-40 quid a bird mark. Again we’re usually still talking good food and drink thrown in.

Also you don’t actually pay for the birds that you shoot as an individual. So let’s say 10 of you decide to go on a 200 bird day at 40 quid a bird.

This will cost your entire party £8000 so £800 each for the day. This is paid by each man regardless of whether he hits 1 or 100 birds, it’s just luck of the draw. The shoot will do their very best to make sure your party shoots 200 birds between you. A good shoot should mix the drives up accordingly so if by lunchtime you’ve only shot 50 birds between you, they’ll make sure the drives after lunch are better ones with more birds (or easier birds if it looks like the reason for the low bag is because the guns are crap shots).

If you reach 200 before the end of the day, you may be given the option to pay a bit more for another drive but this is rare. A good shoot captain / gamekeeper team will be able to judge how the day is going and make it work. The perfect shoot should hit its 200th bird just as the last beater emerges from the woods on the last drive.

Other shoots operate on a more flexible basis and it’ll be around 200. They won’t mind if you go slightly over.

Of course there is a lot of money changing hands and there are occasional disagreements. It’s crucial that the gamekeeper keeps track of how many shots are fired using a click counter. Obviously if the guns kick off saying we paid for 200 birds but only shot 100, the game keeper can say “yeah but you fired 500 shots. The reason you didn’t get 200 birds is because you’re shit.”

Thankfully this is rare. It’s generally a very gentlemanly sport.

What I’ve described above is for commercial shooting. Other ways of doing it are as a syndicate where you pay a fee to join a shoot for a whole season, shooting as many birds as you want. There are DIY shoots run by farmers who might shoot one drive then beat the next, swapping with an opposite number.

I tend to mix it up a bit. We have a syndicate on our estate which I am a member of. I pay a fee for the whole season and that gives me a driven days shooting every Saturday throughout the season. I also do a few commercial days described above with friends and get invited to the odd farm shoot.

We hunt on state land for the most part.

https://wgfd.wyo.gov/WGFD/media/content/PDF/Regulations/Springer-flyer_Final-2-side.pdf

The special season runs for 2 weeks, then they have a 2 week clean up period where you can still go out. They do tend to have some pretty decent birds and this managed hunt has been going since 1973 officially.
It is however my favorite place to go.

We have quite a few farms that will also raise their own birds and let you hunt on them, but you do pay per gun. Normally about $100.00 or more for about 5 birds give or take. Normally the going rate is about 20 bucks per bird, but if you buy in bulk you might get a better rate. However these birds are inferior and better used for training new dogs or just something to do when the season closes in December.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#80
Heres an example of what it costs ,Raynham , thats reasonable priced , I know of some shoots that charge £65.00 per bird.
The shoot I keeper on has modest bags, 800 birds put to wood and 10 days split walk and stand, last season I think they struggled to break 250 in the bag. Its only £450 a year for ten days shooting plus a BBQ and clay day. Its far from formal but most wear ties and some wear tweed, often handed down. The shoot has been in the same family forever, they have owned the farm for 450 years and long may it continue. Many guns and beaters joined to take over from or take part with their parents. Some have been members since the late 1970's. I enjoy the day immensely
 

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