Shocking film tells troops to take cover

#1
A couple of extra hours in the class room.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national...s-to-take-cover/2007/08/25/1187462588710.html

Shocking film tells troops to take cover
Frank Walker
August 26, 2007

AUSTRALIAN soldiers about to be sent into combat zones will be shown a graphic video depicting the damage bullets can cause.

Defence scientists spent three weeks firing bullets into a simulated human torso to show the importance of ducking for cover.

Soldiers about to depart for the Middle East and East Timor will see slow-motion footage of bullets slamming into the dummy. The film shows bullets blasting out huge chunks of the gelatin-filled figure.

Army marksmen fired into the torso with different calibre guns including the Steyr rifle, the standard service rifle of the Australian Army, and the AK-47 assault rifle.

The marksmen also fired bullets to ricochet into a dummy that was behind cover.

Detailed findings of the tests are top secret, particularly the results of firing into body armour. The film is designed to shock soldiers about to head into combat zones, showing that bullets do a lot of damage, even after ricocheting.

"It is a valuable educational tool," Carmine Caputo, a Defence Science and Technology Organisation scientist, said.

He said the film shows the difference between taking cover behind something impenetrable and hiding behind something that conceals but doesn't protect from hostile fire.

"We got scientific information about bullet penetration so that trainers can set up models and simulations," Mr Caputo said.

:D But former soldier Dane Simmonds, who came under fire during two tours of East Timor and one of Iraq, said soldiers already knew it was a good idea to dodge bullets.

"Young soldiers ... don't need to be told to take cover when the bullets are flying," he said.
 
#2
:D But former soldier Dane Simmonds, who came under fire during two tours of East Timor and one of Iraq, said soldiers already knew it was a good idea to dodge bullets.

"Young soldiers ... don't need to be told to take cover when the bullets are flying," he said.

Class! :p
 
#3
winnfield said:
A couple of extra hours in the class room.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national...s-to-take-cover/2007/08/25/1187462588710.html
8O Australian
Shocking film tells troops to take cover
Frank Walker
August 26, 2007

AUSTRALIAN soldiers about to be sent into combat zones will be shown a graphic video depicting the damage bullets can cause.

Defence scientists spent three weeks firing bullets into a simulated human torso to show the importance of ducking for cover.

Soldiers about to depart for the Middle East and East Timor will see slow-motion footage of bullets slamming into the dummy. The film shows bullets blasting out huge chunks of the gelatin-filled figure.

Army marksmen fired into the torso with different calibre guns including the Steyr rifle, the standard service rifle of the Australian Army, and the AK-47 assault rifle.

The marksmen also fired bullets to ricochet into a dummy that was behind cover.

Detailed findings of the tests are top secret, particularly the results of firing into body armour. The film is designed to shock soldiers about to head into combat zones, showing that bullets do a lot of damage, even after ricocheting.

"It is a valuable educational tool," Carmine Caputo, a Defence Science and Technology Organisation scientist, said.

He said the film shows the difference between taking cover behind something impenetrable and hiding behind something that conceals but doesn't protect from hostile fire.

"We got scientific information about bullet penetration so that trainers can set up models and simulations," Mr Caputo said.

:D But former soldier Dane Simmonds, who came under fire during two tours of East Timor and one of Iraq, said soldiers already knew it was a good idea to dodge bullets.

"Young soldiers ... don't need to be told to take cover when the bullets are flying," he said.
:? Australian soldiers are complaining that their Steyr rifles are faulty also the grenade launchers, its on the Aussie news, think it can be found on Yahoo channel 7 tv seems all is not well :?
 
#4
:? Australian soldiers are complaining that their Steyr rifles are faulty also the grenade launchers, its on the Aussie news, think it can be found on Yahoo channel 7 tv seems all is not well :?
I was (un)fortunate enough to escort an Australian loggie full screw around Iraq about 18 months ago. His weapon was filthy and rusted to the extent where I had to question whether it would fire.

By no means do I want to start pointing fingers based on one soldier (there are some mongs in our ranks also), but I can't help but wonder if they don't put the same emphasis on weapon cleanliness as us.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#5
We've all been shown films of horrific injuries caused by weapons! It's part of the training before you go on ranges, or for weapon handling. I think the Aussies have a point.

As for the Steyr being faulty, it's had rave reviews and certainly outperforms the SA80 on the ranges - that's why forces at Bisley, whether Omani or Australian shot the hell out of us on the Queen's Medal day. Although they weren't competing for the Queen's Medal (obviously), they did clean up on all the other awards, notwithstanding the Omani team pretty much being Olympic level for their personal weapons.
 
#6
node said:
:? Australian soldiers are complaining that their Steyr rifles are faulty also the grenade launchers, its on the Aussie news, think it can be found on Yahoo channel 7 tv seems all is not well :?
A lot of ppl ('expert' talkingheads out there) are quite skeptical of that report by C7. Appears more of a beat up (that's not to say there might a some problems).
 
#7
EME tech inspections of a BG's Steyrs found that 14 needed replacement springs for the firing mechanism....not as catastrophic as the press would have you believe. A few other minor issues involved as well (soldier tells press he'd rather have graphite powder than oil, press report this as a national disgrace and government betrayal of defence).....nothing out of the ordinary for deployed forces.

The Steyr is a good rifle; accurate, easy to maintain and well balanced. On the rare occasions that it fails to fire, the IA and relevant stoppage drill magically make it work again.
 
#8
datumhead said:
:D But former soldier Dane Simmonds, who came under fire during two tours of East Timor and one of Iraq, said soldiers already knew it was a good idea to dodge bullets.

"Young soldiers ... don't need to be told to take cover when the bullets are flying," he said.
I was about to say. I certainly didn't need to watch a video to know that being shot is to be avoided.

Then again, the video on STDs that they gave us at Ft Knox was enough to convince you that sex was to be avoided as well.

NTM
 
#9
Now I'm just confused. Is being shot a good thing or a bad thing?

I think I need someone to show me a video to make up my mind...
 

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