Shock horror: Too many Army Officers privately educated

D

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To the question of:
Where do you keep the cutlery?

The answer should be:
I’m not sure, I’ll have to ask the staff.
 

TamH70

MIA
Especially since the Army is a tenth the size now as when the rank structure evolved. Probably it could (and should) be simplified to Private-Corporal-Sergeant and Lieutenant-Major-Brigadier-General.

The Romans managed with just Legionary and Centurion after all...
Oh rly? :)

Decanus - head of a unit of ten. Infantry. Eight combat effectives, two support units.

Decurion - head of a unit of a minimum of ten, up to thirty, including support units. Cavalry.
 
To the question of:
Where do you keep the cutlery?

The answer should be:
I’m not sure, I’ll have to ask the staff.
Reminds me of the old story about the Duke of Norfolk being made Chief Butler of England.
Her Grace’s comment “He’s only just learnt how to stack the dishwasher.”
 
We obviously hail from different parts of the country

Round here Noshing Rods would indicate someone perhaps better suited to the Navy than the army and not because of the rum or lash

Quite true old chap, Born in Cambridge in 1950 ,and, brought up in London's east end, however During my misspent youth in uniform, my last few years , I became several officers drivers, ( as well as my normal job-duties) ending up with the Sqn OC, a splendid chap, commissioned from the ranks, who had an engineering degree, well liked, and unlike most middle management, chatty and erudite, I was on occasions privy to some wonderful salacious gossip, which instilled in me a healthy dislike of some of the more unlikable traits indicative, and I might add, inherent in the officer corps at that time. I did fall foul of one or two total throbbers, one of which was rapidly posted out by the CO. The term noshing rods was first heard by my good self in a cook house (such a Quaint term!) uttered by a conductor of ordinance, said in jest, as a reply to another OR's comment .

Now retired, and living in peace and serenity in a semi-rural setting in middle England.
 
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My wife and I have spent a fortune privately educating our son (of course with MOD assistance) and for him to go to a good university with a full expectation for a career in the infantry. We have spent a fortune on buying baronial silver plate, antique furniture, books by the yard to fill the bookshelves, and having a house that has a name and not a number, in a sterling effort to build up his legend. BBC: you common little oiks!
Arriviste!
 
The Romans managed with just Legionary and Centurion after all...
Great point, Only one teeny-weeny little problem with it.

Legatus Augusti pro paretore
Legatus legionis
Praefecti
Tribunus laticlavius
Praefectus castrorum
Tribunus angusticlavii
Primi ordines
Pilus prior
Centurion
Optio
Signifer/Aquila
Tesserarius
Decurion
Decanus
Legionari

Adrian Goldsworthy (2003), 'The Complete Roman Army' is a good source, but our old friend wikipedia has a fair precis.

Hope this helps?
 
Are too many Army officers privately-educated?

The BBC, continuing it's war on the British Army, has a pointless article about how nearly half, half I tell you, of British Army Officers are from a privately funded education background.

Now, apart from the fact that no-one actually cares, I think the BBC is missing a key point here.

We don't want officers from the schemes and slums of the UK! We want proper Officers wot know to pass the Port to the left and how to ride an 'orse. What does it matter where they come from? The BBC harps on about how the Army is trying to achieve a greater level of diversity, etc. Why? Officers are already diverse - some went to Eton, some went to Oxford. What more do they want?

I do believe the article misses the entire point about how an Officer is a class distinction in and of itself and that they are above the common soldiery and thus are expected to be of good bearing and a proper background. I remember an Int Corp officer who transferred to us. Big muscle bound ape, but the high heid yin's liked what they saw when he was with us in Iraq and so they got him to transfer. Unfortunately for him, because he was a common oik, he had a ******* horrible time. No standing or bearing. no good family behind him, no estate to speak of, etc. He used to eat in the cookhouse rather than the Officers Mess as he couldn't afford it.

So, do we really give a toss where our officers come from as long as they can ride a horse, own land, present themselves in a gentlemanly manner and have a First at Cambridge?
Frankly I’d refuse to soldier if an officer addressed me in anything other than a plummy Home Counties accent.
 

Robme

LE
Are too many Army officers privately-educated?

The BBC, continuing it's war on the British Army, has a pointless article about how nearly half, half I tell you, of British Army Officers are from a privately funded education background.

Now, apart from the fact that no-one actually cares, I think the BBC is missing a key point here.

We don't want officers from the schemes and slums of the UK! We want proper Officers wot know to pass the Port to the left and how to ride an 'orse. What does it matter where they come from? The BBC harps on about how the Army is trying to achieve a greater level of diversity, etc. Why? Officers are already diverse - some went to Eton, some went to Oxford. What more do they want?

I do believe the article misses the entire point about how an Officer is a class distinction in and of itself and that they are above the common soldiery and thus are expected to be of good bearing and a proper background. I remember an Int Corp officer who transferred to us. Big muscle bound ape, but the high heid yin's liked what they saw when he was with us in Iraq and so they got him to transfer. Unfortunately for him, because he was a common oik, he had a ******* horrible time. No standing or bearing. no good family behind him, no estate to speak of, etc. He used to eat in the cookhouse rather than the Officers Mess as he couldn't afford it.

So, do we really give a toss where our officers come from as long as they can ride a horse, own land, present themselves in a gentlemanly manner and have a First at Cambridge?
Officers with a 1st in any degree is possible as dangerous as 2 officers sharing the same map, the most dangerous thing in the British army.
Besides, why would a genius with a. 1st work for the sort of money (which I assume is as shite as an OR pay) they are offered. Unless of course they took the queens shilling to get through Uni with the money on offer to a potential officer entry.
 
Actually, within the Battery, I like to style myself Senior Staff Lance-Bombardier.
Fair enough, but only if your chevrons are worn upside down on the left sleeve only, to commemorate the kicking the regiment got in 1754 when we should have allied with the Bavarians, but lined up with some Wurtemburgers. The musket ball wasn’t compatible, and as a consequence a Cornet had his hat shot off. As a consequence of this utter humiliation we lost our place and are known as the “something Hussars”. (We would have been the “zero Hussars” until someone pointed out this was lower than one, and therefore first on parade). “Last on parade, the somethings!” Has since been the cry of the regiment. The officers are excused standing for the loyal toast as 1) the toaster was stolen by some Greek bandits, and 2) HM The Queen has no idea they exist. Their Royal Colonel is still Duke Wilhelm XXI of Posen, who hasn’t arrived for dinner for a long time.
You will be called “Fish Head” and saluted by all ranks from Major General down every 29 February, the regimental holiday.
 

Robme

LE
And read a map !!
( upside down)
in all honesty, providing they are well educated, well mannered and look after the Lads whats wrong with that !
Map reading? Beyond the intellectual capacity of all officers in my day.
 

Robme

LE
Isn’t the problem that Uni/Army, simply supports the class system, which has really seen the end of days?
The squabble over inclusivity in Oxbridge uni’s is a joke, and I know given I spent a year in Oxford obtaining my cert of higher education (equivalent of 3 passes at A level) which then enabled me to go to Warwick (a much better place of higher learning). The oiks, I met at Oxford, were as limited in ability as they were in common sense (did you Sperm?). If the forces seek Oxbridge graduates to fill places for officer training, then they are simply perpetuating the myth that PPE is anything other than a blind man and his dog degree.
 
One of my school’s alumni dealt heroin for five years before he got caught. Pretty impressive stuff.
A former alumni of my old school had to stay in Thailand for 10 years after exploring pharmaceutical distribution acquisition options within the Tiger economies.
I believe he had to provide long term start up consultancy
 

halloumikid

Old-Salt
Isn’t the problem that Uni/Army, simply supports the class system, which has really seen the end of days?
The squabble over inclusivity in Oxbridge uni’s is a joke, and I know given I spent a year in Oxford obtaining my cert of higher education (equivalent of 3 passes at A level) which then enabled me to go to Warwick (a much better place of higher learning). The oiks, I met at Oxford, were as limited in ability as they were in common sense (did you Sperm?). If the forces seek Oxbridge graduates to fill places for officer training, then they are simply perpetuating the myth that PPE is anything other than a blind man and his dog degree.
72 UCAS points is the bar. You don’t need a degree to be an officer!

Edited to add: Oxbridge graduates are few and far between. Some from Russell Group universities, but these days, anywhere will do. The Army is no longer the career of choice for top end grads!

Halloumikid
 

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