Shock horror: Too many Army Officers privately educated

Ned_Seagoon

Old-Salt
Hugely entertaining when this article comes a matter or weeks after HMG announced the imminent closure of Welbeck. The college was established with, amongst others, the aim of boosting the numbers of non-public school entrants into Sandhurst.
 
I was on my MTO course back in 94 with a WO2 from (DERR or Glosters (?)) Stevie Traveller (?) who asked permission to sing his Regimental song in the morning of their amalgamation into the RGBW. He had a tear in his eye when he finished. So did we but for different reasons.
I worked on the CP Team that looked after Gen Sir John Waters when he was DSACEUR.

He was a very proud Gloster, as were his 2 ADCs that worked for him. He was devastated at the amalgamation and as a result his son transferred out of the Regt to The Coldsteams, all because his dad told him that The RGBW had no future.

Quite sad really.
 
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Deleted 60082

Guest
I can attest to that, the Mrs had her office in Head Office Canary Wharf and another in Northampton. She was not on the investment banking side but, knew people there and used to meet regularly with top team get togethers. Clever people in banks, particularly investment banking, nowadays arrive for work with degree's in economics and mathematics and in most case's have post-graduate degree's - do a PhD in something whizzy fig mathematically financial and you have to fight off City banks with a shitty stick.

The days of former officers wandering into a career on the trading and investment side in the City are long gone. The Mrs liked recruiting ex-military personnel for their reliability and work ethic but, for accounting you recruit an accountant, for HR you recruit a HR professional, for trading and treasury you recruit suitably qualified people. Most ex-militry are recruited as general admin and if motivated to move up will do a suitable professsional qualification over 2 or 3 years to facilitate a move into the deeper depths of banking which pay more.

I once spoke with Deutsche Bank for a developmental IT job and ended up being taken to lunch by the bloke who ran a significant part of their trading floor. Because of the stuff I had being doing on my post-grad degree he wanted to see if I would be a good trader. We both agreed I did not have the combined maths and economic experience to be able to do the job - I was perfectly capable of speaking to his people to design specialist software for them using my AI skill's but, could not do their job as long as I had a hole in my ARRSE. So taking Henry the well connected Cavalry officer and turning him into a high income generating city trader is not feasible without a few years training and experience.............ask @Banker
There are some ex military people who are successful, but few are in front office roles these days. If someone is young enough (mid/late 20s) and they have the drive, they can do quite well in sales roles in the financial services sector, provided they graft hard on their professional exams.

Others do well in the compliance and programme delivery areas - indeed, the latter is the area that seems to draw the most ex military officers into the City and Canary Wharf. A few ex senior NCOs work in the city, but I suspect that they are too cynical to be drawn in to the bright lights, uber-long hours and the February churn of under-performing sales staff.

In terms of using terms like 'Sir', as Donny has commented, it doesn't affect the work within the FCO; I've worked for two UK ambassadors and one US ambo; the US State Department is more rigid in observing titles and deference than US; we are by no means less effective for having an informal workplace.
 
I worked on the CP Team that looked after Gen Sir John Waters when he was DSACEUR.

He was a very proud Gloster, as were his 2 ADCs that worked for him. He was devastated at the amalgamation and as a result his son transferred out of the Regt to The Coldsteams, all because his dad told him that The RGBW had no future.

Quite sad really.
There was a Lt Waters Glosters' who got a George Cross in Korea for his sacrificial bravery as a captive after Imjin, rather think he died as a POW.
That explains it, his other son I think was in the Rifles.
 
One of my school’s alumni dealt heroin for five years before he got caught. Pretty impressive stuff.

A chap from my old place was recently promoted; he's now in charge of all the dog waste bins and collections as well as supervising the removal of chewing gum from the pavement in Flintshire.
 
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Bob65

Old-Salt
That's been my experience; I look back now and see how anachronistic the MOD and the Services are, especially over the use of rank and titles. Something like 55% of FCO officers are women; 25% are BAME (not including LEs). Clever as clever things, too.
Especially since the Army is a tenth the size now as when the rank structure evolved. Probably it could (and should) be simplified to Private-Corporal-Sergeant and Lieutenant-Major-Brigadier-General.

The Romans managed with just Legionary and Centurion after all...
 
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Deleted 60082

Guest
Especially since the Army is a tenth the size now as when the rank structure evolved. Probably it could (and should) be simplified to Private-Corporal-Sergeant and Lieutenant-Major-Brigadier-General.

The Romans managed with just Legionary and Centurion after all...
Yes, I remember the Roman rank structure in my youth.

17 levels of rank in the Army of today equates to 17 levels of grossly inefficient management.
 
Especially since the Army is a tenth the size now as when the rank structure evolved. Probably it could (and should) be simplified to Private-Corporal-Sergeant and Lieutenant-Major-Brigadier-General.

The Romans managed with just Legionary and Centurion after all...
What no Staff Corporals? Outrageous.
 

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