Shock horror: Too many Army Officers privately educated

How many of those had their privately funded education paid for by BSA or CEA as it's become?
I doubt that that is a statistic that is collected - in other words, it would be asking "how did you parents/guardians pay for your education?"

It could be inferred, perhaps, by correlating those who had a parent in the Services against those Cadets who were privately educated - but you would then need to differentiate between the parent(s) that served, say, on a SSC or Gap Year Commission, versus those who did 16+ years (and therefore more likely to have kids at school and claiming CEA).

In other words, quite complex to collect.
 
It’s the system not heroic individual anecdotes

And yes if your parents could afford a private education you are privileged

No doubt you’ll come back with they did eight jobs and worked 29 hours a day etc etc
I just used my family’s history as an example; Its far from unique. There was a period of massive social mobility in the post war years that saw many families move from poverty to middle class and beyond.

It’s far more complex; but there is no “system” to blame. The old school tie hasn’t influenced employment decision for years. Employers hire talent, not school ties.
 
Like much that comes out of the BBC these days, this has nothing to do with truth or reality.. it is simply another attempt to play the "Equality of Outcome" card as has been deployed across the board in pursuance of the left liberal agenda.

Anyone who is capable of meeting the entry qualifications for officer training should have that opportunity. This has been the case for decades. That their ability to complete officer training and gain a commission should be based on the source of their secondary education is plainly absurd..

Quality and competency can be directly linked to equality of opportunity, enforcing equality of outcome guarantees selecting incompetents and the failure of the system...

 
I went to a school reunion a few years back, for my local comp in Auckland, New Zealand. The cool kids were in dead-end jobs; lived in the same area (and in some cases, the same house) and hadn't really experienced life outside of familiar comfort zones. They married the first piece of skirt they met at school, as well.

But they lived in happy ignorance, I suppose.

ETA: one became a drug dealer and was assassinated in Bogotá in the early 1980s. That’s experiencing life, but a little extreme even for my tastes!
I found the same thing after attending a secondary school reunion in Onehunga.
The day I left school I also left the area and never returned until that reunion and that was 25 years later, so had never seen or had anything to do with my peers from school.
During that time I had spent 10 years in the military of which 2 of them were on active service. Since my military time, I then traveled the world repeatedly working in the oilfields.
It was an eye opener to see what others had done, or more interestingly, what they had not done.
Most had, as you say had married the first female who had waved their fanny at them, and none as far as I could tell had ever been too far from home.
I had traveled back from Dubai for the reunion and when I was asked where I had come from and I told them, their eyes seemed to glaze over and most if not all, could not comprehend where Dubai was.
It was an interesting weekend.
 
I think this dynamic is under-recognised. I went to a truly dire public school in the late 80s and early 90s, there is a queue of ex-teachers going through the courts at the moment. Last week the chaplain got 12 years for child abuse, last year my history teacher got 18 for rape.

Academically sound, the place was however like Lord Of The Flies. My point is that after the foulness of Christ’s Hospital School, Sandhurst was never going to be a remotely unpleasant experience for me, nor did it hold any fear. I’d suggest this also contributes - if fractionally - to the higher number of public school attendees at RMAS?
Rather contradicting myself here given my previous posts, but I do agree that a boarding school experience makes joining the Army (whether RMAS or in the ranks) an easier experience. I went to a particularly 'robust' boarding school in Scotland for a short while. This is the sort of thing I was doing as a teenager (although in the '80s not the '70s:


The RM used to send a liaison officer each term and the RM built a sort of tarzan assault course at the school. Bit of a head start for those joining the military.

BTW, my dad went to Christ's Hospital in the 1920s. He had a deep and abiding loathing of it - probably for similar reasons to yours.
 
It’s far more complex; but there is no “system” to blame. The old school tie hasn’t influenced employment decision for years. Employers hire talent, not school ties.
Hmmmmm

But the old school tie, right Regiment, right club network is alive and well too. Try and get a job in the City without using it....
 
Two different contexts, although I admit they do look contradictory!

IIRC the second quote was specifically about resettlement. When people leave the services, they often have next to no network beyond their service connections. Of course they fall back on those; it’s self perpetuating. At best, it opens doors. BTW I’ve never got a job on the back of connections.

The first quote is more general. Businesses hire talent, not old school ties. Same for the modern public sector. I can’t remember ever asking an interviewee what school he or she went to. I don’t look at school history when I read a CV. It’s irrelevant. No-one gives a flying about who you know unless those contacts are valuable for business development.
 
I found the same thing after attending a secondary school reunion in Onehunga.
The day I left school I also left the area and never returned until that reunion and that was 25 years later, so had never seen or had anything to do with my peers from school.
During that time I had spent 10 years in the military of which 2 of them were on active service. Since my military time, I then traveled the world repeatedly working in the oilfields.
It was an eye opener to see what others had done, or more interestingly, what they had not done.
Most had, as you say had married the first female who had waved their fanny at them, and none as far as I could tell had ever been too far from home.
I had traveled back from Dubai for the reunion and when I was asked where I had come from and I told them, their eyes seemed to glaze over and most if not all, could not comprehend where Dubai was.
It was an interesting weekend.
I’d flown in from Germany for my last reunion, having previously been in Rome and Afghanistan. And yes, their eyes did glaze over at the reunion at Penrose High School. Most had travelled a little bit; a holiday to Bali, perhaps Disneyland in California, perhaps to ‘England’ to meet relatives, but few had worked overseas. Yet they were often quite critical of me with “How can you live in England? It’s like Coronation Street” or trite, monotone statements like “it rains in England all the time”. (For those unfamiliar with Auckland, it has a damp, humid and grey climate). It’s telling that the only high school mate I keep in touch with is a guy who joined the NZ Army and has had an interesting career. This is in stark contrast with my Auckland university classmates who have traveled and done really interesting stuff. Likewise those I was in the RNZAF with. But will I go back to another High School reunion? I somewhat doubt it. It is as if I come from a completely different world now and have had a life completely unrecognisable to them. Sadly, this also applies to my sister in Melbourne.
 
Two different contexts, although I admit they do look contradictory!

IIRC the second quote was specifically about resettlement. When people leave the services, they often have next to no network beyond their service connections. Of course they fall back on those; it’s self perpetuating. At best, it opens doors. BTW I’ve never got a job on the back of connections.

The first quote is more general. Businesses hire talent, not old school ties. Same for the modern public sector. I can’t remember ever asking an interviewee what school he or she went to. I don’t look at school history when I read a CV. It’s irrelevant. No-one gives a flying about who you know unless those contacts are valuable for business development.
I concur with the importance of networking during resettlement. I milked my military, university, RAF and Club connections; had perhaps 5 meetings at C&G, a similar number next door atvmy Club, even two meetings at a rather discreet club in Knightsbridge. And God knows how many coffees on the City and Canary Wharf with ex military officers who offered to chat about their work. And this was with people I only had the slightest connection with. My current job was through a fellow Arrser (I referred to it earlier) and through him my CV landed on the desk of a Director and thence to interviews and offer.

My eclectic background got me noticed and from then on it was up to me to meet the exacting and egalitarian standards of future employers.
 
I’d flown in from Germany for my last reunion, having previously been in Rome and Afghanistan. And yes, their eyes did glaze over at the reunion at Penrose High School. Most had travelled a little bit; a holiday to Bali, perhaps Disneyland in California, perhaps to ‘England’ to meet relatives, but few had worked overseas. Yet they were often quite critical of me with “How can you live in England? It’s like Coronation Street” or trite, monotone statements like “it rains in England all the time”. (For those unfamiliar with Auckland, it has a damp, humid and grey climate). It’s telling that the only high school mate I keep in touch with is a guy who joined the NZ Army and has had an interesting career. This is in stark contrast with my Auckland university classmates who have traveled and done really interesting stuff. Likewise those I was in the RNZAF with. But will I go back to another High School reunion? I somewhat doubt it. It is as if I come from a completely different world now and have had a life completely unrecognisable to them. Sadly, this also applies to my sister in Melbourne.
That was my experience entirely.
Now that I am retired, I live back in NZ in the BOP and absolutely refuse to go anywhere near Auckland.
In the last few months I have been going through the process of getting a war disablement pension and Veterans Affairs tried to send me to Remuera for a specialists appointment, I went off my head and told them that I refused to do a 450 km round trip into the Southern motorway traffic for a 30 minute appointment so they cancelled that and sent me to a doctor in Tauranga.
A small victory.
 
Every time I am in the room, and boy does it turn heads in some of them :)
I've just had an image of that officers' mess carpark flash into my head: lots of nice cars, axles all resting on piles of bricks.
 
I wondered as to why the BBC dropped this statistic on to their website and what prompted it. After a bit of digging around I discovered that last Wednesday, the Labour Party had a large Westminster meeting to discuss their grass roots campaign to abolish private schools hosted by the Labour MP Kate Green, the Fabian Society and the Socialist Educational Association, and was addressed by another Labour MP, Laura Smith.
The BBC showing their true bias again.
But should a Labour government (God forbid) abolish private schools, where would Labour MPs educate their children?
 
At private schools reserved for the families and friends of the elite and thus exempt, silly. It's all about equality, don'tcherknow?
 

Fang_Farrier

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I just used my family’s history as an example; Its far from unique. There was a period of massive social mobility in the post war years that saw many families move from poverty to middle class and beyond.

It’s far more complex; but there is no “system” to blame. The old school tie hasn’t influenced employment decision for years. Employers hire talent, not school ties.
There's a lot of upward social mobility around.
My family's history reflects that.
Grand fathers miners
Parents and siblings, military, nurses
Cousins, brother and self all university level and beyond
 

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