Shock horror: Too many Army Officers privately educated

From a colleague:

‘BBC fails to identify that 1/3 of officers claiming CEA are in fact LE Officers (an unhelpful fact towards the BBC’s argument as it would demonstrate social mobility). It would be interesting to know the percentage of those public school educated LE children that then go to RMAS. Also higher % of service personnel attending Cranwell is in part due to RAF policy - all ORs seeking commission in RAF up to and including Warrant Officer have to go through Cranwell: they have no LE style commissioning route. Suspect RMAS % would change if LE commissioning course stats added in. So BBC are using apples and pears statistics.’
There is a Commissioned Warrant Officer scheme now, which is similar to the LE course but only available to WOs. Those who attend CWOC at Cranwell (it's 2-3 weeks long) graduate as Flight Lieutenants.
 
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Deleted 60082

Guest
Partly true, but having the right connection, via the employers new hireling, gives them another contact within in their field of expertise. networking I think its called.
Which is not the same thing. We all network (or at least should) as that’s how people get jobs. My current part time consultancy which I recently started was through chatting to an Arrser who put me on to a director. I then had to go through the full interview process, nonetheless, but I won it in competition. The position was never advertised, instead the firm relies on its professional staff to be their recruiters. Apparently 60% of positions are never advertised.

At the interviews, I did not wear my college tie (Cambridge), I did not wear a service tie, I did not wear a veterans badge either…But having service connections definitely got me to the first interview stage.
 

Yokel

LE
I think that's pushing the argument a bit far. There's a lot of public schools, it doesn't mean they have a ready-made network.

I do appreciate that the composition of different units' messes will be different, but I would argue that for the most part the Army's officers are representative of a meritocratic selection system.
I was talking generally - I think the Armed Forces are an exception, and Sandhurst, Dartmouth, Cranwell, and Lympstone are great levelers.

In my own Reserve unit, there has been a bit of a mafia with people from a certain branch who works as civvies at the same place getting the lions share of the promotions.

Not really an advert for funding an Eaton education though. I mean, why would you invest £50+k a year in an education which leads your kids into a £70k job?
Do you mean Eton or are you talking about Eton Aerospace. They have a plant near me and at least one person I was at school with works there.

The problem with cliques is that they favour the uneducated.
 
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Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I’m just about to post the same in the Corbyn thread but it’s also relevant here:

The BBC, like Corbyn, fails, is unable to, or simply chooses to ignore the difference between equal and equitable.
 
A majority of current MPs educated at comprehensive schools, study finds
wooo nearly half of mps are state educated and this is seen as progress. 1 in 10 went to Eton
So, to summarise, from a statistical viewpoint the Army’s Officer corps is made up of the same state/private ratio as the Commons who were elected by the same people that the BBC somehow think should be shocked by the first statistic.

Hmm.

What would be more revealing is to know how many people from each cohort put themselves forward in the first place but were rejected by the selectors/voters.

Don’t fall into the trap of thinking that the two variables you’ve identified necessarily explain a causal link. There could easily be a confounding variable in there (e.g. being dissuaded by third parties).

Oh, and in answer to the question about accents in the officers mess, my experience is that regional accents are now quite common. So, sorry @A signaller , I just don’t buy that tired old ‘Daddy’s influence’ dogma any more.

Edited to remove typeahead punctuation error.
 
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Deleted 60082

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In sum, boys who have Been privately educated are confident, speak well, self-reliant, good net-workers, know how to behave appropriately (and an appropriately!)…also if they have been a boarder, even more so.

I’ve met a lot of my son’s friends, and they are very self-assured young men and a credit both to their parents (who have generally worked bloody hard to afford the fees) and themselves, and of course, to the school itself.

Who wouldn’t want to employ them? Putting academic considerations aside for the moment, who wouldn’t want them in leadership positions in the army, for example, given that they have a strong sense of team, of drive, and of self reliance?
 
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Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
In sum, boys who have Been privately educated are confident, speak well, self-reliant, good networkers, know how to behave appropriately (and an appropriately!)…Also if they have been a border. I’ve met a lot of my son’s friends, and they are very self-assured young men and a credit both to their parents (who have generally worked bloody hard to afford the fees) and of course, to the school itself

… Who wouldn’t want to employ them? Who wouldn’t want them in leadership positions in the army, for example, given that they have a strong sense of team, of drive, and of self reliance?
The results of pragmatic nurturing rather than mollycoddling, then?
 
The only people that "Love it" are the people that are part of it, Joe public on the whole, couldn't give a tupeeny fcuk, Its the 1000+ year old ingrained system that divides, and alienates the bulk of the population from advancement, in politics, military and commerce. Regional accents in America are no bar to high office. When was the last time you heard a brummie, cockney, scouse accent in the mess, in high office in politics, in the higher echelons of finance. The old established familys of merrie England have dominated UK's management for centuries. sons follows father, helped along by the club, and the old school tie, contacts in the civil service and the HoL. The freemasons are part of the equation. Its who you know, family connections and schooling that determine carers. Old money, and family links back to the Norman conquest are essential in the majority of placements. "Daddy owns half of Shropshire, and is lord lieutenant of loamshire" ...." Not a problem old boy, you have got the job"
What a load of old shit. there are plenty of millionaires who grew up poor. Part of the reason they are millionaires is because they didn't sit around whining about rich people.
As for the Freemasons I bet you know Jack shit about them but that won't stop your jealous made up stories about them will it?
 
In sum, boys who have Been privately educated are confident, speak well, self-reliant, good networkers, know how to behave appropriately (and an appropriately!)…Also if they have been a border, even more so.

I’ve met a lot of my son’s friends, and they are very self-assured young men and a credit both to their parents (who have generally worked bloody hard to afford the fees) and of course, to the school itself.

Who wouldn’t want to employ them? Putting academic considerations aside for the moment, who wouldn’t want them in leadership positions in the army, for example, given that they have a strong sense of team, of drive, and of self reliance?
Agreed.
Another key point, particularly relevant to boarding, is you learn to live with others, some of whom you don’t like or don’t necessarily agree with: you learn to tolerate the foibles of others and, of course, they have to do the same for you.
 
The last time I was in the Officers' Mess, along with Welsh, Scottish, and NI accents.
i don't think he meant the stewards.
 
I'm attending a dinner time lunch time session on "accents and perceptions; do you judge others as less intelligent because of their regional or class accent?"

The company I work for has 16k staff, 12k are grad, post grad or higher.


I'm immensely looking forward to questioning the assumption in the title. "You", it seems are not someone with a regional or class accent that could lead to a perception....

I'll take my Northern English accent along and courteously explain that, as I'm from Chester and Chester is quite literally the city where England became a nation, mine is the proper manner in which to speak and the artificial gruntings from the unloved boarding school emotional retards are deviations.


Naturally I will further explain how we State school Northerers are entirely free of bias.
Careful, you don't want to sound a right Deva.

I'm here all week. I thenk yew.
 
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Deleted 60082

Guest
Agreed.
Another key point, particularly relevant to boarding, is you learn to live with others, some of whom you don’t like or don’t necessarily agree with: you learn to tolerate the foibles of others and, of course, they have to do the same for you.
And learn how to bully them, but these days without leaving marks or filming them.

Seriously, you’re absolutely right. I remember when I did my officer training; I had been in the University reserves and those joining straight from school who had been at a boarding school slipped into the routine without batting an eyelid. Those who had not left home, or had not been in the cadets, struggled.
 

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