Shock horror: Too many Army Officers privately educated

A former alumni of my old school had to stay in Thailand for 10 years after exploring pharmaceutical distribution acquisition options within the Tiger economies.
I believe he had to provide long term start up consultancy
There we go. Better than starting a management scheme with one of Britain’s leading supermarkets, eh?
 

Robme

LE
Back in the late 70’s, and first met Mr. Oldfield whilst doing a roulement tour at Springfield Rd Police Station, Belfast. Fast forward to around 1984, now working in NI as a civil servant. Involved in whatever needed doing at the time. Maurice is well gone by then, but the department he set up, was still working
Problem at the time was the lack of intel sharing, by the various agencies active in NI, eventually sorted and I like to think I did my little bit for the peace process.
Biggest problem was the number of ex-public schoolboys, easily spotted by the bearing, dress sense (lack of) and attitudes. Who were working for 5, SIS, Int corps, Police (not so many in the police ranks). And who had very little common sense for the situation and the job in hand.
It was often said at later reunions that the whole shibang could have been wrapped-up long before boy-Blair came along, but for the quality of those actors on the wider stage that was NI.
 
Isn’t the problem that Uni/Army, simply supports the class system, which has really seen the end of days?
The squabble over inclusivity in Oxbridge uni’s is a joke, and I know given I spent a year in Oxford obtaining my cert of higher education (equivalent of 3 passes at A level) which then enabled me to go to Warwick (a much better place of higher learning). The oiks, I met at Oxford, were as limited in ability as they were in common sense (did you Sperm?). If the forces seek Oxbridge graduates to fill places for officer training, then they are simply perpetuating the myth that PPE is anything other than a blind man and his dog degree.
What on earth are you on about? Did you get a degree or what?
Come back when you are talking sense.
 
To the question of:
Where do you keep the cutlery?

The answer should be:
I’m not sure, I’ll have to ask the staff.
No. A better degree of dégagé would be to state ‘You shall have to ask the staff.’

As if you are preoccupied with where the cutlery is. Honestly. Apart from the occasional fear that fishknives have crept into the house, it’s entirely a matter for the household.
 
No. A better degree of dégagé would be to state ‘You shall have to ask the staff.’

As if you are preoccupied with where the cutlery is. Honestly. Apart from the occasional fear that fishknives have crept into the house, it’s entirely a matter for the household.
Which place are we on about? I know about the one in town, the one in the country, and the little place in Scotland. Are there any more?
 
D

Deleted 60082

Guest
Back in the late 70’s, and first met Mr. Oldfield whilst doing a roulement tour at Springfield Rd Police Station, Belfast. Fast forward to around 1984, now working in NI as a civil servant. Involved in whatever needed doing at the time. Maurice is well gone by then, but the department he set up, was still working
Problem at the time was the lack of intel sharing, by the various agencies active in NI, eventually sorted and I like to think I did my little bit for the peace process.
Biggest problem was the number of ex-public schoolboys, easily spotted by the bearing, dress sense (lack of) and attitudes. Who were working for 5, SIS, Int corps, Police (not so many in the police ranks). And who had very little common sense for the situation and the job in hand.
It was often said at later reunions that the whole shibang could have been wrapped-up long before boy-Blair came along, but for the quality of those actors on the wider stage that was NI.
So the (lack of) peace in Northern Ireland was down to the intransigence of former Public School Boys? Care to give examples?
 
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Were once the Rifle Brigade and King's Royal Rifle Corps, Then the Royal Green Jackets now Rifles. Although there is a hierarchy within the various Battalions. The Rifles have amalgamated in most of the traditional old Infantry Battalions like the Devon & Dorsets, Royal Hampshires and even the old DERR - hardly Light Infantry!
Don't forget the KRRC.
 
Back in the late 70’s, and first met Mr. Oldfield whilst doing a roulement tour at Springfield Rd Police Station, Belfast. Fast forward to around 1984, now working in NI as a civil servant. Involved in whatever needed doing at the time. Maurice is well gone by then, but the department he set up, was still working
Problem at the time was the lack of intel sharing, by the various agencies active in NI, eventually sorted and I like to think I did my little bit for the peace process.
Biggest problem was the number of ex-public schoolboys, easily spotted by the bearing, dress sense (lack of) and attitudes. Who were working for 5, SIS, Int corps, Police (not so many in the police ranks). And who had very little common sense for the situation and the job in hand.
It was often said at later reunions that the whole shibang could have been wrapped-up long before boy-Blair came along, but for the quality of those actors on the wider stage that was NI.
Thank you for your service.

In my time we shared int, not intel.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
100% of those on my intake at RMAS were university graduates.

For some reason or other.
 
And if his brief is halfway decent, probably won't be either...
A very long time ago I found myself a defence witness at a CM for a former CSM charged with several counts of theft. He, quite rightly, got off and went on, I'm told, to a second career with HMRC.

Lessons for me were: don't charge someone with an offence that can't be proved, and if your pension is on the line, engage a QC.
 
From a colleague:

‘BBC fails to identify that 1/3 of officers claiming CEA are in fact LE Officers (an unhelpful fact towards the BBC’s argument as it would demonstrate social mobility). It would be interesting to know the percentage of those public school educated LE children that then go to RMAS. Also higher % of service personnel attending Cranwell is in part due to RAF policy - all ORs seeking commission in RAF up to and including Warrant Officer have to go through Cranwell: they have no LE style commissioning route. Suspect RMAS % would change if LE commissioning course stats added in. So BBC are using apples and pears statistics.’
That's interesting, the RAF do have an LE commissioning route but the old gits don't like being treated as SO3s so punch out pretty quickly.
 

Bob65

Old-Salt
Isn’t the problem that Uni/Army, simply supports the class system, which has really seen the end of days?
The squabble over inclusivity in Oxbridge uni’s is a joke, and I know given I spent a year in Oxford obtaining my cert of higher education (equivalent of 3 passes at A level) which then enabled me to go to Warwick (a much better place of higher learning). The oiks, I met at Oxford, were as limited in ability as they were in common sense (did you Sperm?). If the forces seek Oxbridge graduates to fill places for officer training, then they are simply perpetuating the myth that PPE is anything other than a blind man and his dog degree.
I don’t think it has (seen the end of days). Kids grow up now reading Harry Potter, the central premise of which is that everyone who matters all went to boarding school together. Everyone else is a pleb, with a made-up word for it. The class system is ingrained at an early age, and people love it.
 
The class system is ingrained at an early age, and people love it.
The only people that "Love it" are the people that are part of it, Joe public on the whole, couldn't give a tupeeny fcuk, Its the 1000+ year old ingrained system that divides, and alienates the bulk of the population from advancement, in politics, military and commerce. Regional accents in America are no bar to high office. When was the last time you heard a brummie, cockney, scouse accent in the mess, in high office in politics, in the higher echelons of finance. The old established familys of merrie England have dominated UK's management for centuries. sons follows father, helped along by the club, and the old school tie, contacts in the civil service and the HoL. The freemasons are part of the equation. Its who you know, family connections and schooling that determine carers. Old money, and family links back to the Norman conquest are essential in the majority of placements. "Daddy owns half of Shropshire, and is lord lieutenant of loamshire" ...." Not a problem old boy, you have got the job"
 

Bob65

Old-Salt
The only people that "Love it" are the people that are part of it, Joe public on the whole, couldn't give a tupeeny fcuk, Its the 1000+ year old ingrained system that divides...
What you’ve written is 100% true, but what I meant was, Joe Public loves these books and movies that glamorise the class system. People fantasise about being a part of it, not burning it to the ground*.The class system won’t be dead until people read Harry Potter and wonder why the muggles haven’t guillotined the lot of them yet!

* any oaths any of us may have said notwithstanding haha
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Actually, within the Battery, I like to style myself Senior Staff Lance-Bombardier.
Amateur, surely it should be acting senior bombadier major of horse (unpaid) Substantive canteen cowboy
 

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