Shock horror: Too many Army Officers privately educated

MrBane

LE
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#1
Are too many Army officers privately-educated?

The BBC, continuing it's war on the British Army, has a pointless article about how nearly half, half I tell you, of British Army Officers are from a privately funded education background.

Now, apart from the fact that no-one actually cares, I think the BBC is missing a key point here.

We don't want officers from the schemes and slums of the UK! We want proper Officers wot know to pass the Port to the left and how to ride an 'orse. What does it matter where they come from? The BBC harps on about how the Army is trying to achieve a greater level of diversity, etc. Why? Officers are already diverse - some went to Eton, some went to Oxford. What more do they want?

I do believe the article misses the entire point about how an Officer is a class distinction in and of itself and that they are above the common soldiery and thus are expected to be of good bearing and a proper background. I remember an Int Corp officer who transferred to us. Big muscle bound ape, but the high heid yin's liked what they saw when he was with us in Iraq and so they got him to transfer. Unfortunately for him, because he was a common oik, he had a ******* horrible time. No standing or bearing. no good family behind him, no estate to speak of, etc. He used to eat in the cookhouse rather than the Officers Mess as he couldn't afford it.

So, do we really give a toss where our officers come from as long as they can ride a horse, own land, present themselves in a gentlemanly manner and have a First at Cambridge?
 
#2
Standing by to be corrected, but I believe that many in the Household Division prefer their officers to be 'upper class' types. It is far more egalitarian in the corps and most infantry regiments.
 

MrBane

LE
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Reviews Editor
#3
Standing by to be corrected, but I believe that many in the Household Division prefer their officers to be 'upper class' types. It is far more egalitarian in the corps and most infantry regiments.
................. You mean.......... not every Regiment has landed gentry for their officers?

........ what?

What happens in the officers mess though? Surely all the silver gets stolen and bottles of cheap cider are presented instead of Port?

How does the Regiment function? Does the MOD know about this? How has it been allowed to happen??
 
#4
Standing by to be corrected, but I believe that many in the Household Division prefer their officers to be 'upper class' types. It is far more egalitarian in the corps and most infantry regiments.
That trend ended a lot during HERRICK when they realised quality was more important than breeding. HCav have held onto it a bit more. Whether the HDiv reverts to type or not in the coming decades who knows

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#5
I find it amusing that it's a new metric now.

Before it was "too many Army Officers are graduates" now they've decided on their secondary education.

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AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#6
I find it amusing that it's a new metric now.

Before it was "too many Army Officers are graduates" now they've decided on their secondary education.

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Let me get this in early.

Too many officers are cisgender* male.
_____
* Unfortunate that my stupid fúcking cúnting twátting speelchucker changed cisgender to distended...
 
#8
Not only are 50% of Officers from State schools but 20% come from the ranks. No wonder the Commissioning course used to be known in our Corps as the "Knife Fork and Spoon Course".
 
#9
It happens in many areas of employment. Too many graduates, too many public schoolboys, too many white males, too many middle class.........
All it leads to is a dumbing down of skills for the sake of being inclusive.
 
#10
Does the. BBC not think it’s possibly a reflection of who actually wants to join the army as an officer? I doubt it’s pushed by many state school careers advisors - in the same way they warn pupils off going to Oxbridge universities because they might find it a bit elitist.
 
#12
Not only are 50% of Officers from State schools but 20% come from the ranks. No wonder the Commissioning course used to be known in our Corps as the "Knife Fork and Spoon Course".
You can tell you’re a Rupert. Anybody else would just say KFS course.
 
#14
My wife and I have spent a fortune privately educating our son (of course with MOD assistance) and for him to go to a good university with a full expectation for a career in the infantry. We have spent a fortune on buying baronial silver plate, antique furniture, books by the yard to fill the bookshelves, and having a house that has a name and not a number, in a sterling effort to build up his legend. BBC: you common little oiks!
 
#17
#18
Are too many Army officers privately-educated?

The BBC, continuing it's war on the British Army, has a pointless article about how nearly half, half I tell you, of British Army Officers are from a privately funded education background.

Now, apart from the fact that no-one actually cares, I think the BBC is missing a key point here.

We don't want officers from the schemes and slums of the UK! We want proper Officers wot know to pass the Port to the left and how to ride an 'orse. What does it matter where they come from? The BBC harps on about how the Army is trying to achieve a greater level of diversity, etc. Why? Officers are already diverse - some went to Eton, some went to Oxford. What more do they want?

I do believe the article misses the entire point about how an Officer is a class distinction in and of itself and that they are above the common soldiery and thus are expected to be of good bearing and a proper background. I remember an Int Corp officer who transferred to us. Big muscle bound ape, but the high heid yin's liked what they saw when he was with us in Iraq and so they got him to transfer. Unfortunately for him, because he was a common oik, he had a ******* horrible time. No standing or bearing. no good family behind him, no estate to speak of, etc. He used to eat in the cookhouse rather than the Officers Mess as he couldn't afford it.

So, do we really give a toss where our officers come from as long as they can ride a horse, own land, present themselves in a gentlemanly manner and have a First at Cambridge?
Jonathan Beale the journo, was an MP's assistant. I'll wager it wasn't a Tory or LibDem.

There's no mention of who anywhere and it's missing from his LinkedIn bio

1560592435881.png
 
#19
My wife and I have spent a fortune privately educating our son (of course with MOD assistance) and for him to go to a good university with a full expectation for a career in the infantry. We have spent a fortune on buying baronial silver plate, antique furniture, books by the yard to fill the bookshelves, and having a house that has a name and not a number, in a sterling effort to build up his legend. BBC: you common little oiks!
Good effort, but I think you’re a little optimistic in hoping your own time in the polyester service will be forgotten in just one generation - that’s a hell of a handicap for your lad to overcome ;)
 
#20
From a colleague:

‘BBC fails to identify that 1/3 of officers claiming CEA are in fact LE Officers (an unhelpful fact towards the BBC’s argument as it would demonstrate social mobility). It would be interesting to know the percentage of those public school educated LE children that then go to RMAS. Also higher % of service personnel attending Cranwell is in part due to RAF policy - all ORs seeking commission in RAF up to and including Warrant Officer have to go through Cranwell: they have no LE style commissioning route. Suspect RMAS % would change if LE commissioning course stats added in. So BBC are using apples and pears statistics.’
 

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