ships or boats

#2
A boat = a vessel under 40 feet or 40 tons unless its a fishing boat or submarine.
A Ship = above 40 tons or 40 feet.
You dont get fishing ships !!
 
#5
Also tecnically a ship has 2 or more enclosed decks.
 
#7
Subs and fishing vesssels are always called boats. No Idea why except that you dont get many subs under 40 feet or 40 tons. (can of worms opened now - Oh yes you do I can hear them say). Oil rigs are commonly known as platforms as they are towed and fixed. Ie no engines or sails.

Clear as mud lol

More Japes at 10pm in the mess chaps

Efargee20
 
#8
Just to add chaos to confusion, here's a rule of thumb. A ship can carry a boat, but a boat can't carry a ship. :?
 
#11
you are all wrong.

the definition of a ship is "a vessel with a complete visible upper deck".

a submarine is not a ship as its upper deck is encased so not visible

Cant believe no other matelots got in there first

Rincewind
 
#12
Rincewind said:
you are all wrong.

the definition of a ship is "a vessel with a complete visible upper deck".

a submarine is not a ship as its upper deck is encased so not visible

Cant believe no other matelots got in there first

Rincewind
The national Historic Ships register criteria to register a vessel is as mentioned on my first post. 40 feet or 40 tonnes. No subs or fishing boats in this category.
Also mentioned in other sites is the fact about a ship can carry a boat but not vice versa.
Another method is she is over 150 feet with 3 or more gaff or square rigged sails. Older shops.

Matelots my buttocks

FRG20
 
#13
Rincewind said:
you are all wrong.

the definition of a ship is "a vessel with a complete visible upper deck".

a submarine is not a ship as its upper deck is encased so not visible

Cant believe no other matelots got in there first

Rincewind
so expand, why does that make a submarine a boat?
 
#15
Didosdadsdogsdead said:
Just to add chaos to confusion, here's a rule of thumb. A ship can carry a boat, but a boat can't carry a ship. :?
Does this mean that HMS(hip) Nottingham should've been referred to as HMB(oat) Nottingham while it was being carried back up to blighty on the big lifting ship thingy??!!??
 
#16
For the smallest commissioned ship in the Royal Navy, see http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/static/pages/2790.html which shows the 14-metre survey vessel HMS GLEANER, also referred to as HMSML (Her Majesty's Small Motor Launch) GLEANER.

In the old days a frigate would be HM Frigate X and the title HM Ship would be reserved to full ship-rigged (3 fully square-rigged masts) vessel. Nowadays they seem all to be HMS.

I think if she wasn't commissioned she would be a boat.
 
#17
You're all wrong!!

All HM Ships are known as pussers sleek grey war canoes!
 
#18
Ratfink said:
Didosdadsdogsdead said:
Just to add chaos to confusion, here's a rule of thumb. A ship can carry a boat, but a boat can't carry a ship. :?
Does this mean that HMS(hip) Nottingham should've been referred to as HMB(oat) Nottingham while it was being carried back up to blighty on the big lifting ship thingy??!!??
Ratfink, Im PMSL here. After all the foregoing we thought we were smart till you popped up with the HMS(B) Nottingham thingy. LOL excellant point. Where's all the matelot Walts wen you need em.

Jolly Japes behind the mess 7pm sharp chaps.

Effy
 
#19
The basic line is this: if the Queen says it's a ship, it's a ship. It doesn't have to be logical.

Merchant vessels can argue among themselves.
 
#20
Asked a Navy friend this recently and his answer was that with the exception of submarines a boat can be carried on a ship!
 

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