Shipping Container, as Bridge.

Got a small stream at bottom of garden, need to get vehicles in for big jobs. Pickup, zipper lift etc. Would a shipping container be OK. Its to bridge about five metres or so.


CFB.
 

BaldBaBoon

War Hero
The shipping container, which I assume is the standard ISO type is essentially a box with all the structural strength going through its skeleton....and the panels in the roof and walls, being just metal sheets to give the box its weather proof and cargo protecting abilities.

Basically the skeleton is robust, but the roof is not very strong at all.

If you could run beams across the width, not the length of the ISO that act as improvised decking, that would provide strength...would need a bit of thought on the beam thickness and how to securely anchor them to the roof though.
 
ISO's are obviously used for shipping vehicles, so should be OK for STATIC load. A quick Google finds this, which must have the answer somewhere in its 48 pages:
http://www.hapag-lloyd.com/download...tions/Brochure_Container_Specification_en.pdf

But... moving vehicles put extra loads on the box, which would also need to be anchored to abutments strong enough to take the loads.

Could you save the hassle and create a fording point? A 20' ISO in your garden isn't going to look great.

(we did once use 40' ISO as a footbridge)
 

4(T)

LE
Use a load of concrete culvert pipes, with a layer of road tailings on top?


I've just had to build an 11 metre timber bridge across a stream in my garden, but its not suitable for vehicles over golf buggy weight. Mind you, might try the wife's Suzuki Jimny if I'm feeling brave..
 
Got a small stream at bottom of garden, need to get vehicles in for big jobs. Pickup, zipper lift etc. Would a shipping container be OK. Its to bridge about five metres or so.


CFB.
Get a bundle of fence posts connected with some wire and chuck 'em on top of a concrete drainage pipe.
 
Are using the ISO as a tunnel bridge over the stream, or drop it into the stream as a culvert
 
fascine.jpg
 
Thanks for ideas, beck is too deep to ford ( vertical sides ). Water authority won't allow culverting , l only need bridge access for duration of work, a couple of months.
Sorry can't get this tablet to up load photos, but its a private tarmac road running parallel to stream. Two metre drop to water level and three metres bank to bank.

PS as in ' Covered Bridges of Madison County'. But starring me.

CFB.
 
Sorry, effing smart phone gave you the wrong rating.

If you are hiring the iso container, check the agreement on how it can be used. Bridges might be a no no.
 
3m gap?

What's the H&S presence on site?

Box section isn't that expensive and making a ladder out of it'd not take a welder long.

Few bits of ply over the top and you're good to go.

H&S'd have a fit if they saw it, but will they?
 

ottar

LE
The problem with a shipping container is that they normally only have doors at one end (ones with doors both ends do exist, but as there is a global shortage of containers, good look finding one). You'd end up having to cut the other end out, which is under tension and a bugger to get in the right place to weld back up.

Structurally, there is no reason why not. They're only ever stood on their corners, and they're loaded mostly with 4t of forklift driving up and down inside them and have a ~30t swl (and that is with them hung in the sky).

Look for a 20' flat, instead. You'll need rails each side if it's a professional job - bit of scaffolding would do it.
 
O post: 6073572 said:
3m gap?

What's the H&S presence on site?

Box section isn't that expensive and making a ladder out of it'd not take a welder long.

Few bits of ply over the top and you're good to go.

H&S'd have a fit if they saw it, but will they?
H&S is me, easily bribed, its all DiY. If it looks dangerous then wife can do it.

CFB.
 

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