Shamima Begum allowed back to the UK

Agreed re politics and the workings of society. However in the past, when literacy was far more limited, it also left us clues and lessons from the past. Whatever we think of the Bible, the translation to German then English, plus the printing press, was a major step in improving literacy and knowledge.
The Germans translated the Hebrew fairy tales before we did? Makes me think there's something in that translation that got HItler riled up
 
it would have seemed far less problematic to simply extradite her once the Kurds had done with their legal system or allowed them to deport her. Then try and put her in prison

That being the problematic word. I think there is a very high probability that she will return, and if she does a very high probability that she will get off on a technicality after her lawyers have trousered 6 or 7 figures.
 
That being the problematic word. I think there is a very high probability that she will return, and if she does a very high probability that she will get off on a technicality after her lawyers have trousered 6 or 7 figures.

Your grounds for that assessment on such a serious case the authorites have had since 2015 to prepare?
 
Noises were being made as far back as the 1980s over the rather liberal take we had on providing shelter to dissident groups. It wasn't us who coined terms such as 'Londonistan', it was others such as the French who were concerned at some of those we were allowing in.

When radicalisation really got a foothold is more of the debate. to my mind, it was during Blair's tenure when any criticism of mass inward migration was shut down with accusations of racism and the introduction onto the statute books of Hate Crime. Criticism was stifled and some people took full advantage.

@BarcelonaAnalPark @Boumer - care to add anything/put me right?

French concern was more over the fatwas coming out from London. I doubt they cared who we had in London, it was what impact they had on French interests.

Why we permitted it? I suppose an argument for "don't poo on your own doorstep" and we were a bit busy with the P/IRA rather than far away places we know little of and cared less? Doesn't appear to have worked if it did ever happen.

I'm a just a bit bored of the debate here, which is heading around in circules (not from you) to a "simple" time machine/virtual genghis final solution to the issue. Of course when we get to the white ethno-ARRSE end-state, we'll purge the leavers and the book readers too I suppose?
 
Noises were being made as far back as the 1980s over the rather liberal take we had on providing shelter to dissident groups. It wasn't us who coined terms such as 'Londonistan', it was others such as the French who were concerned at some of those we were allowing in.
Would that be the same French that provided asylum for Ayatollah Khomeini? Mind you, we all know where Das Kapital was written.
 
Would that be the same French that provided asylum for Ayatollah Khomeini? Mind you, we all know where Das Kapital was written.

British Museum wasn't it?

Still, lovely place.
 
The Reading Room thereof.

Home to Charles Fort as well.

In 1920 the Forts moved to London, where Charles resumes his researches in the British Museum. In the next few years, he contributed four letters to the New York Times. All dealt with his view that extraterrestrial beings were visiting the Earth; humanity remains blind to their presence even though the evidence for their presence—in the form of reports of unearthly aerial phenomena be credible observers—exists in abundance


From where we now have The Fortean Times.

Rains of frogs and UFOs. More credible than dialectial materialism.
 
Noises were being made as far back as the 1980s over the rather liberal take we had on providing shelter to dissident groups. It wasn't us who coined terms such as 'Londonistan', it was others such as the French who were concerned at some of those we were allowing in.

When radicalisation really got a foothold is more of the debate. to my mind, it was during Blair's tenure when any criticism of mass inward migration was shut down with accusations of racism and the introduction onto the statute books of Hate Crime. Criticism was stifled and some people took full advantage.

@BarcelonaAnalPark @Boumer - care to add anything/put me right?


My bold, it goes back even further with Groups like Zanu & Zapu, Rhodesian terrorist groups having offices in London in the '70's. As did several other radical Islamic groups like the Muslim Brotherhood before the much vaunted "Arab Spring" which railed against brutal dictators in the ME & N. Africa and replaced them with often much worse Islamic state nutters or chaos as we see in Syria & Libya!
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Noises were being made as far back as the 1980s over the rather liberal take we had on providing shelter to dissident groups. It wasn't us who coined terms such as 'Londonistan', it was others such as the French who were concerned at some of those we were allowing in.

When radicalisation really got a foothold is more of the debate. to my mind, it was during Blair's tenure when any criticism of mass inward migration was shut down with accusations of racism and the introduction onto the statute books of Hate Crime. Criticism was stifled and some people took full advantage.

@BarcelonaAnalPark @Boumer - care to add anything/put me right?
we have always had extremists in London
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Even Stalin lived in London for a time
 
we have always had extremists in London
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Even Stalin lived in London for a time
The top one is on Haymarket. But of course, Ho Chi Minh was later arrested and 'thoroughly questioned' by the Hong Kong Police Special Branch and locked up for several years before being released on appeal. It was during that time that his protégé and fellow Annamite, Lai Tek, fled to Malaya, became Secretary General of the Overseas Chinese Communist Party and was run for 15 years as a British agent by Special Branch out of Singapore. His handler was a fascinating colonial police officer, René Onraet


ETA: Lai Tek worked for the notorious Kempetai after Singapore was occupied by the Japanese, and passed back to being a British run agent in 1945.
 
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The British we're fighting Islamic extremists in 1881
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Indeed Mahdist War - Wikipedia. Which simmered on in various guises for a while until Kitchener sorted them out.
One of the last battles was Omdurman which involved this chap "The sole British cavalry regiment, the 21st Lancers, was armed with lance, sword and carbine. The officers also carried pistols. Winston Churchill bought a Mauser pistol before leaving Britain for the Sudan. In the charge Churchill chose to use his pistol rather than his sword."
And of course This character was allegedly involved

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