Sex offenders face net use curbs

Discussion in 'The Intelligence Cell' started by RABC, Apr 4, 2008.

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    Of course this will really work won't it - they won't just go off and create new email addresses and new profiles.

    This is almost as good as illegal immigrants being asked to make their own way to the the detention centres.

    Who is running this outfit ??
  2. Not only that, RABC, but the sites aren't even based within our jurisdiction. Facebook and Bebo for instance are based in California. So how are we going to tell them what to do, anyway?
  3. Its a joke, how hard is it to create an anonymous e-mail address?
    Another ill conceived and poorly thought out idea from the usual suspects.
    I'm all for curbing the activities of these perverts but it has to be something that actually works rather than sounding good on the news.
  4. Sound bite politicians trying to kid the public that something is being done about the nonces, since the jails are full and can't we lock them up anymore.

    How many hours of parliamentary time will be spent debating a law that can't be enforced?
  5. Couldn't agree more, absolute waste of time from the law makers this one. For a start, like has been pointed out on here, what's to stop them from registering their valid e-mail address, then simply creating a new 'clean' e-mail account to re-register with the social networking sites? Add to this the fact that they are pretty much all based outwith our jurisdiction and this is a non-enforceable piece of legislation.

    It does however make me laugh that providers are being pushed to use a 3 strike rule to stop people from downloading music and films, yet they are not being asked to monitor the content with regards to child images. Call me cynical, but is that because the film and music industries are applying the pressure because of lost revenues, whereas there doesn't appear to be any lost revenue with child images??? Shocking behaviour if you ask me.
  6. Another 'lets make it look like we are doing something' policy that (shock horror) will be unworkable, ineffective and pointless.
    What this law says to me is that released sex offenders who have served their time are still a threat to society and therefore the punishment has failed. If they are still a threat then surely we shouldn't be releasing them into the big bad world but 'treating' their condition to allow them to be useful and safe members of society again.
    This law would mean that if they do use a new 'clean' email address, and get caught then it should be much easier to lock them up and make the internet a safer place for one and all.

    Devils advocate hat on-
    If the punishment/treatment of sex offenders is successful enough to allow them to be released back into society, then surely they are being discriminated against by curtailing their social lives over the internet?

    Devils advocate hat off-
  7. Another day, another eye-catching, soon to be forgotton and dropped, initiative.
  8. Unenforceable !
  9. If a person is a threat to children, they should be locked away. If not, they should be left to live their lives with the same rights as everyone else. Letting them out and then attempting to monitor them, particularly in this unenforceable manner, is fcuking ridiculous.