Septic war dogs.

#2
II agree except for this: " (The war dogs deployed to Vietnam during that conflict were classified as "surplus equipment" and left behind.)"

In point of fact they were not merely "left behind" but were wantonly killed in spite of their tremendous contributions and sacrifices. It is a shameful chapter in our military history and another result of misinformation about dogs--the assumption was they could not re-adapt to life in the US and also may be carrying diseases--neither of which were true.
 
#4
#11
I saw a documentary, on 'Yesterday Channel' recently on the use of dogs in the Pacific war by the USMC, it covered the story from the start to the finish of the war.

The dogs were donated by families for the duration, trained and served in the island hopping campagn, they were remarkably effective, to the extent that dogs and handlers became prime targets.

At the end of the war those dogs that survived, were 'detrained' and returned to the donating families with great sucess.

Slightly off thread back in the eighties I was told that dogs came in three types;
Trackers
Guard dogs, and
Wardogs who were simply let loose in an enclosed compound and would attack anything that entered the area, the psychopath nutters of the canine world of security.
 
#12
This post reminded me of this guy:



When my unit was disbanded we had to do a lot of spring cleaning. I was one of the guys that found this dog in one of the closets in the hallway of the unit hall. I hadn't thought about it really until today to see whatever happened to it. I'm glad to see that it was donated to a museum.

Here's a brief history on the dog:

Philly, World War I mascot of "Philadelphia's own," 315th Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army, 1932. See Philly in the exhibition, Wartime: Illustrations by Norman Rockwell, May 24-December 31, 2006 The dog Philly was a good luck charm and decorated veteran with the 315th Infantry Regiment, known as "Philadelphia's own," when it fought in France during World War I. Philly was enlisted as a stray when a member of the 315th picked her up while the troops were training in Maryland, named her Philly, and smuggled her on a troop transport to France. Philly lived in the trenches and on sentinel duty barked at night whenever German troops began their attacks. A German commander went so far as to place a bounty on her head. Philly received two honorary Bronze stars, one for a mustard gas attack and one for a shrapnel wound. At war's end she returned to the United States with the troops and marched in the victory parade in Washington, D.C., in front of President Woodrow Wilson. Philly lived until 1932 in Philadelphia and attended annual regimental reunions, where her favorite foods were liver and cake. In 1998, when the 315th was eliminated in military downsizing, Philly was donated by the regiment to the Philadelphia City History Collection at AKMP.
 
#15
Here's a war dog related item,the original Rin Tin Tin the doggy star of film TV and radio, was a rescued German wardog, brought back to America after WWI.
 
#16
This post reminded me of this guy:



When my unit was disbanded we had to do a lot of spring cleaning. I was one of the guys that found this dog in one of the closets in the hallway of the unit hall. I hadn't thought about it really until today to see whatever happened to it. I'm glad to see that it was donated to a museum.

Here's a brief history on the dog:
Was it still alive?
 
#17
Well wonder what they do to their newest versions ?

[video=youtube;W1czBcnX1Ww]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1czBcnX1Ww[/video]

[video=youtube;VXJZVZFRFJc]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXJZVZFRFJc&feature=related[/video]
 
#19
Slightly off thread back in the eighties I was told that dogs came in three types;
Trackers
Guard dogs, and
Wardogs who were simply let loose in an enclosed compound and would attack anything that entered the area, the psychopath nutters of the canine world of security.

Kind of right there In addition to the search dogs mainly AES (Arms & Explosive Search) and Drugs (RMP) there were Tracker dogs and three main class of biting machine used by the Army. These were Police dogs (MOD Plod / RMP) which are multi role Track, search and detain (hold / bite). Security Arm True - mainland UK security dog trained to bite and hold the arm only and the Guard Dog, wrongly referred to as a war dog which as you rightly point out were generally trained to cause maximum damage to anything or anyone they got hold of. These were deployed to overseas postings such as Belize, Cyprus and also NI.

They were however handled by a handler same as any other patrol dog although we did use them as compound dogs one example being the ammo compound at Magilligan point Camp where the dog had a kennel and just wandered free. I had one dog who would sit on a foggy night up on top of the ammo bunker and howl back to the fog horn you could hear, very bizarre not to mention f**king annoying.

I have a huge respect for dog handlers and trainers worldwide and can honestly say it is one of the most satisfying and rewarding jobs I've ever done and one I hugely miss. If you ever want a perfect colleague look no further than a dog. They give all and want nothing but respect and affection in return.
 
#20
A good read. I didn't know that the yanks deployed dogs to Vietnam either.

Indeed so-mostly GSDs and Dobermans--mainly trained for security and attack. In those days, explosives detection and other even more esoteric uses were not even thought of. We had a dog (Doberman) and handler on a number of patrols and they certainly "paid their own way" in helping detect ambushes and track down those whe escaped from ours. It is a stain on our time there in terms of the shabby way they were dealt with upon our leaving.
 

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