Sensor clean.

#1
The Sensor in my Canon 7D & 5D MkII both need a clean, I've noticed in some Piccy's the spots. I've read a fair number of articles on cleaning but I'd like arrse posse solution :)
 
#2
It's a modern day first sign of Spring- blue skies and f22 = a pain in the backside and much time spotting in Photoshop. The most I do myself is give it a blast with a rocket blower- take the lens off, put the shutter speed on to 1/30, hold the camera with the bayonet mount facing the floor, trip the shutter, squeeze the blower upwards into the camera- obviously being careful not to touch anything with the nozzle.

When it gets too much I send it to someone who knows what they're doing to sort out.
 
#3
It's a modern day first sign of Spring- blue skies and f22 = a pain in the backside and much time spotting in Photoshop. The most I do myself is give it a blast with a rocket blower- take the lens off, put the shutter speed on to 1/30, hold the camera with the bayonet mount facing the floor, trip the shutter, squeeze the blower upwards into the camera- obviously being careful not to touch anything with the nozzle.

When it gets too much I send it to someone who knows what they're doing to sort out.
I do almost exactly the same, but have risked at times using a sunglasses cloth (but only new ones) and gently swabbing at more persistent dust areas.

I'm surprised you're getting issues, I had them with the original 5d but the Mkii vibrating sensor seemed to do the trick for me.

That and I stuck to the same prime lenses on the various bodies and tried not to change at all! When my old man asked me to clean his 5d mkii I told him to get a professional bloke to do it as I didn't want to mash my fat fingers into his only camera sensor.
 
#5
Apart from the above, try a (an?) Arctic butterfly brush. It generates static electricity as it is powered by a AAA battery. Brush over the sensor CAREFULLY - this removes all but the most stubborn dust. If, however, you have fingerprints etc on the sensor, professional cleaning is the only way.
 
#7
How would you get fingerprints on the sensor?
Duh. Wiping off dust :-D

To the OP, think seriously about touching the sensor with anything other than relativly gentle blasts of air. If you've ever has a camera with interchangeable focusing screens, and tried to clean one of those, you will know that it is much easier said than done. And focusing screens are a site cheaper, less damage-prone and easier to replace than a knacked CCD.
 
#8
Thanks for the replies. I think I'll wait until there are a few more dust spots before I try a sensor clean. The Photoshop clone tool will do for now.
 
#9
Anyone remember the good old days, when each exposure had a brand-new “sensor”? ;-)

I've only fairly recently got back into stills photography and, having been warned about the perils of dust, bought myself one of these: Lenspen - DSLR Sensor Cleaning

After two years (despite swapping lenses in all sorts of locations), I haven't needed to use it once...

Damn you, vibrating sensor! :)
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
Anyone remember the good old days, when each exposure had a brand-new “sensor”? ;-)

I've only fairly recently got back into stills photography and, having been warned about the perils of dust, bought myself one of these: Lenspen - DSLR Sensor Cleaning

After two years (despite swapping lenses in all sorts of locations), I haven't needed to use it once...

Damn you, vibrating sensor! :)
better to have it and not need it, as need it and not have it.
 
#11
How would you get fingerprints on the sensor?
Lock the shutter open, then push your finger all the way to the sensor and press your finger against it.... hold for a few seconds. That should fek it up. If not pour in nail varnish.

I use a SENSORKLEAR pen, but only when the blower doesn't do the job.

That said, thought the Arctic butterfly brush sounded interesting.
 

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