Sectioned by mistake?

Nope. No change at all. Except that when I was originally admitted to A&E they immediately stopped the Sertraline without my consent or awareness, or the consent of my partner.

Finally, the day I was discharged after a consultation with a very kind and sensible psychiatrist, she explained that Sertraline should never be taken on its own, without a tranquilizer/antipsychotic to "balance it".
Paragraph one is what I would hope to hear, as is the second. Just take it easy, Bob. As I’m sure you know, things take time. And a bit of effort.
I look forward to you giving us grief in future, bunch of pussies that we are.
 
Where did you drink as if you think you had a drink spiked this could be a Police matter.
Who were the 3 good people to section you as It needs to be looked in to, possibly by you're own GP.
Olanzapine is more the anxiety and stress with no real bad symptoms from taking it.

That said it must have been frightening for you.

The three people will have been a Section 12 Approved doctor, normally a psychiatric registrar or consultant, a GP and an Approved Mental Health Practitioner, normally a social worker. It’s actually hard to get all 3 to agree to it and in nearly 20yrs of clinical experience all take the deprivation is someone’s liberty in this way extremely seriously.

Olanzapine is an anti-psychotic, it’s never prescribed for anxiety and stress as it has no effect on these unless caused by psychotic symptoms. It also has significant side effects, the main one that impacts on compliance being weight gain.

Edited to add that it’s also used for the treatment of manic episodes in those who suffer from bipolar disorder.
 
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Nope. No change at all. Except that when I was originally admitted to A&E they immediately stopped the Sertraline without my consent or awareness, or the consent of my partner.

Finally, the day I was discharged after a consultation with a very kind and sensible psychiatrist, she explained that Sertraline should never be taken on its own, without a tranquilizer/antipsychotic to "balance it".
I’ve never known a psychiatrist prescribe an anti-psychotic or hypnotic to ‘balance’ a very good anti-depressant, albeit with the standard side effect profile associated with SSRIs and if any of my consultants did it I’d be asking them some very serious questions. Anti-psychotics don’t work in that way.
 
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CC_TA

LE
If you can remember where you drank, and had your drink spiked, go back there, and ask to view any CCTV they might have it on the day-night in question. If positive, take it to plod, you also have a good case of miss diagnosis against the medics, if it is proved that your drink was spiked, and they did not do a toxicology test.
Last time I dealt with a suspected spiking the medics gave a generic medication and they said there wasn't time to find out what exactly what they've been given - if they waited for results most patients would have died or fully recovered & fooked off by the time the results got back.

When the patient finally came to in hospital she was told no point for (Spiking) blood tests now.

...RMP were really helpful though :lol:
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
PS. I'm fairly certain when I read this thread tomorrow I will be overwhelmed by the support, and it will spur me on to think positively, do the things I can do, forget ....oh you know the old adage.

There is simply nobody else I can speak to because the whole convoluted history is exhausting - if they don't show some sign of understanding within the first minute or so, I have to walk away or scream. Or worse.
The trouble is, when drugs get into your system and do weird things, its like being ill, any problems that you normally keep under control or below the surface assume greater magnitude, and then trivial things blow up and wear you down even more
I got bitten a few years back, started bursting into tears, could not cope, tiredness, everything got on top of me, the dragon took me to the doc and he found out I had lymmes disease
a bottle of pills and a few days rest and back to normal
and yet before that silly things assumed massive proportions
so maybe when you were drugged all the problems you have had over the past year or so dealing with your mum and the house, came to the fore
are you sure you were alone in this room that was arranged ?
perhaps a few enquires with the staff to see if they recall anything out of the ordinary, or check the cctv
 
Nope. No change at all. Except that when I was originally admitted to A&E they immediately stopped the Sertraline without my consent or awareness, or the consent of my partner.

Finally, the day I was discharged after a consultation with a very kind and sensible psychiatrist, she explained that Sertraline should never be taken on its own, without a tranquilizer/antipsychotic to "balance it".
I was prescribed Sertraline on its own for years , I've never heard that.
 
I was prescribed Sertraline on its own for years , I've never heard that.
An anti-psychotic wouldn’t be given for that. From the original post and knowing what the medications mentioned I can make a good guess as what has happened but I’m not going to say as it wouldn’t be fair.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
The trouble is, when drugs get into your system and do weird things, its like being ill, any problems that you normally keep under control or below the surface assume greater magnitude, and then trivial things blow up and wear you down even more
I got bitten a few years back, started bursting into tears, could not cope, tiredness, everything got on top of me, the dragon took me to the doc and he found out I had lymmes disease
a bottle of pills and a few days rest and back to normal
and yet before that silly things assumed massive proportions
so maybe when you were drugged all the problems you have had over the past year or so dealing with your mum and the house, came to the fore
are you sure you were alone in this room that was arranged ?
perhaps a few enquires with the staff to see if they recall anything out of the ordinary, or check the cctv
Dear Josh

It certainly had been an exhausting and frustrating year, but I think sheer physical exhaustion played more of a part than any "normal reaction to life events".

Also, and this is a biggie, which I only thought about last night whilst out with friends (very glad I made the effort to go by the way), and that is DEHYDRATION!!. Most people are aware of what this can do to elderly people who get urinary tract infections which then send them a bit doolally. (Im not at that stage yet, before you ask).

I definitely had, and still have, a raging thirst most of the time - I'm a quaffer of long drinks at the best of times, and never without water/decaff coffee/juice most of the day and night!

Oddly enough, my partner said that whenever he visited me in hospital, after half an hour or so, he felt the same - possibly to do with the controlled atmosphere/aircon sucking out any moisture?

Also, weight gain was mentioned as a side effect - another oddity is that people who have not seen me for a couple of months have been saying "ooh, you look well, have you lost weight!?"

I've lost SOMETHING, and I suspect it is fluids - my clothes are hanging off me, but my weight has remained exactly the same!! Riddle me that!
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
PS. You will also note that whatever time I go to bed - early or late; whatever alcohol I drink - 4 pints or nothing; I am up and doing at pretty much exactly the same time (0630 give or take a few mins).

WTF?
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
I've lost SOMETHING, and I suspect it is fluids - my clothes are hanging off me, but my weight has remained exactly the same!! Riddle me that!
Possibly not appropriate but

Have you lost your marbles?



;-)
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
I did also ask (with what tiny "presence of mind" I had left) for my blood sugar to be tested in case of borderline diabetes.

It was quite amusing as the HCA pricked my finger in such a fairylike manner that nothing happened, I heard two of them having a conflab about "not getting enough to run the test". "Ere," says I, "let me squeeze my finger for you" ; soon they had what they needed, and the test showed "slightly high" but nothing to worry about.

Probably down to too many biscuits - "why are you always eating sweet biscuits?" "Because, dear HCA, there is **** all else to do at night, and almost nothing savoury"

Had a long conversation about replacing salts/sugars with something simple like "dioralyte" an over the counter remedy for fluids lost due to D&V - none of the staff seemed to "get this" or even show a remote interest. After trying to explain that "dioralyte" (or other electrolyte drink) was SIMPLE FIRST AID, rather than a "medicine", I gave up and made sure I had marmite on my buttered toast every morning to make a change from ******* sugar.

Don't get me started about the Leerdammer cheese I bought in Hastings on that lovely afternoon of 1st September. I had an idea to have some bread and butter, cheese and a couple of the ubiquitous apples that were always around but no-one touched! Would make a change from the usual brekker fare.

I put the packet stood up at the back of the fridge. All well and good. Checked fridge around midnight. Packet of cheese still there, looking all yellow and lovely.

At 0800 hrs the following morning I go to the dining room with a small smile and a spring in my step. Check fridge - leerdammer cheese still there - or so I thought. On removing the packet, however, I found that whilst the packet was still there - THE ******* CHEESE HAD BEEN TAKEN AND THE PACKET PUT BACK EMPTY.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Yeah, that'd be it. :p
Those Glass Alleys are more trouble than they are worth.

Better without them xxx

Hang in there chick.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
Those Glass Alleys are more trouble than they are worth.

Better without them xxx

Hang in there chick.
Actually I think they have been stolen and inserted under the skin of my legs ....

Still no idea what the strange "granular" feeling is ...

I know it was most uncomfortable trying to sleep on the horrible plastic mattress with one slippery sheet. It felt as if I was lying on large stones. I was informed that these things were "standard hospital beds".

No, mate, they are kiddies crash mats from a school gymnasium. I'm not that daft.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Actually I think they have been stolen and inserted under the skin of my legs ....

Still no idea what the strange "granular" feeling is ...

I know it was most uncomfortable trying to sleep on the horrible plastic mattress with one slippery sheet. It felt as if I was lying on large stones. I was informed that these things were "standard hospital beds".

No, mate, they are kiddies crash mats from a school gymnasium. I'm not that daft.
Care to place a small wager on that? ;)
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer

socialdespatch

War Hero
I was informed that these things were "standard hospital beds".

No, mate, they are kiddies crash mats from a school gymnasium. I'm not that daft.
Try doing CPR on a soft mattress, it soon becomes clear. The ones in CCU are worse (for sleeping on, much better for CPR.....)
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
Try doing CPR on a soft mattress, it soon becomes clear. The ones in CCU are worse (for sleeping on, much better for CPR.....)
I do take your point. I am used to sleeping on a firm mattress! It was not the firmness that was uncomfortable, but the horrible plasticky feeling combined with odd lumps and bumps!

Suffice to say that when I was transferred to an NHS hospital, the mattress felt much more comfortable!

More likely something to do with being easy clean/difficult for really potty people to destroy!?

(My father worked as a draughtsman for the Home Office Prisons Department - so many parallels with the stories he used to tell me :) )
 

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