Searching for karaoke singing soldiers!

#1
Hello,

I was wondering if you can help me with my search for serving British soldiers who like singing karaoke?

I work for a theatre and film company called QUARANTINE and we're creating a new artwork exploring the world of currently serving UK soldiers through the music they listen to called 'The Soldiers Song' - a karaoke booth where the visitor finds a video screen, a microphone and an invitation to sing along, with a soldier singing on video. The project has already recruited a few enthusiastic singing soldiers but we want to enlist a few more. So, if you're a singing soldier, I'd love to hear from you. You can contact me via email: office@qtine.com or call me on 0161 830 7318, or make contact via this forum. Or, if you know of any UK venues where soldiers go to sing karaoke, I'd be grateful for the tip.

The specially designed karaoke booth will tour to theatres, galleries and public spaces. Quarantine have made work in places from Vancouver to Belgium as well as their home in Manchester.

This project is being undertaken with the knowledge and co-operation of the British Armed Forces and in funded by Arts Council, England.

If you would like more info then please take a look at:
The Soldiers Song
QUARANTINE WEBSITE

Thanks in advance for help you can provide.

Best,
Amanda
 

B_AND_T

MIA
Book Reviewer
#2
You'll be lucky to find one that will do it with their clothes on.
 
#5
I think most people need a bit of Dutch courage to get up on the mic, but I've never come across naked karaoke before...

By the way, we're prepared to travel across country to film any karaoke action!
 

Alsacien

MIA
Moderator
#6
amanda_qtine said:
I think most people need a bit of Dutch courage to get up on the mic, but I've never come across naked karaoke before...

By the way, we're prepared to travel across country to film any karaoke action!
Have you not been to Finland :wink:
 
#9
amanda_qtine said:
I don't think we can afford SuBo now! Did I read somewhere that she's able to command £8k per minute??!
Bootiful is a lovely singer, she won't charge that much as well if someone wants to do a duet with her. I get it for free, but I'm sure she'll do "Mate's Rates" if you find her some naked men to sing with. :wink:
 
#10
Amanda,

Thanks for the invite, I actually love to sing "American Pie" and even do it reasonably sober.

I would be more than happy to send you a video with all my details (name, regt, family details etc.) just as soon as Qtine have sorted out the Al Qaeda, CIRA and RIRA threats to my security and that of my family.

Until then, I`m afraid I will have to pass up on the opportunity for my 15 mins, whilst I get on with the task in hand.

Regards,

TF
 
#11
TF,
I would love to see you doing American Pie! Appreciate that you have concerns regarding security. Just wanted to reassure you that this is a serious project, and of course we don't want to jeopardise anyones safety. We wouldn't need any family details. You might be interested in seeing our blog where we have an example of the type of video we're looking to film: www.thesolderssong.blogspot.com

This piece of work is a serious consideration of British soldiers and the work they (you) do.
The Soldier's Song explores the world of currently serving British soldiers through the music they listen to.
“Two wars go on – and I still buy shoes, decide what I want for tea, chat about the weather…
I don’t know what I think any more. The Soldier’s Song started as an attempt to help me answer my own questions – What are these wars we are engaged in? Who fights them? What is my place in all this?
We don’t find out about people fighting in our name until they die, or break the rules, or publish a bestseller based on their experiences. A world apart - with its own rules, codes and culture.”
Renny O’Shea - director
The Soldier’s Song is a karaoke booth.

A microphone. A screen. An invitation to act. The visitor chooses the song. The soldier on the screen sings their favourite karaoke tune. A chance to share a moment with an individual, a chance to think about that person and our connection with them, a chance to sing along if we choose.

Best,
Amanda
 
#12
amanda_qtine said:
The Soldier's Song explores the world of currently serving British soldiers through the music they listen to.
An idle question, but what people listen to and what they sing, especially in Karaoke, are frequently disparate. Is this really the best way of accomplishing something that might have laudable foundations but is in fact so far removed from the object it's bordering on random?
 
#14
Try the Seven Stars in Canterbury . Last time I even looked at the place it was rammed with Squaddies giving it large to Hi-Ho Silver lining. Actually, I don't think they particularly cared what was on, judging by the amount of 2 hands full of beer dancing that was going on...
 
#15
An idle question, but what people listen to and what they sing, especially in Karaoke, are frequently disparate. Is this really the best way of accomplishing something that might have laudable foundations but is in fact so far removed from the object it's bordering on random?
That's an interesting question - does the fact that an activity is is a diverse one - undertaken by individuals the world over - make it a random one? We're not sure if this is the best way of revealing something about soldiers to us civvies, but it is one way, and they way we've chosen to explore...

I personally find it really interesting that one of our soldier participants chose to sing the Irish Rover, and in an Irish accent. I wasn't expecting that. And I know that's probably to do with my ignorance and stereotyping - which is why this piece of work works, I think!

Thanks for your thoughts...
 
#16
Try the Seven Stars in Canterbury . Last time I even looked at the place it was rammed with Squaddies giving it large to Hi-Ho Silver lining. Actually, I don't think they particularly cared what was on, judging by the amount of 2 hands full of beer dancing that was going on...
Thanks for the tip off!
 
#17
May I illustrate with an example.
I know one soldier who has been known to sing certain numbers from Grease and Dirty Dancing, who mostly listens to Snoop Dogg, Orbital and the occasional bit of R&B. 'Drop it like it's hot' isn't first choice, as she is petite, English and female, and would look/sound ridiculous.

I'm not a sociologist, but I've sat in a few Karaoke bars in my time around the planet, and choice of song has far more to do with cultural heritage, age, sex and event. I would imagine being a soldier is largely irrelevant, and think you have wasted everybody time to make something that is meaningless.

You'd have been far better off compiling a list of songs that soldiers listen to on ops/when training. Would have saved a few quid too.
 
#18
amanda_qtine said:
I don't think we can afford SuBo now! Did I read somewhere that she's able to command £8k per minute??![/quote]

I do hope that figure is correct. I'm due a pay rise this year :D
 
#19
amanda_qtine said:
Try the Seven Stars in Canterbury . Last time I even looked at the place it was rammed with Squaddies giving it large to Hi-Ho Silver lining. Actually, I don't think they particularly cared what was on, judging by the amount of 2 hands full of beer dancing that was going on...
Thanks for the tip off!
Man, that's another intelligence blunder then. Did nobody notice that the original poster's initials are AQ? amanda_qtine, you are Osama Bin Liner and I claim my five pounds.
 
#20
May I illustrate with an example.
I know one soldier who has been known to sing certain numbers from Grease and Dirty Dancing, who mostly listens to Snoop Dogg, Orbital and the occasional bit of R&B. 'Drop it like it's hot' isn't first choice, as she is a petite, English and female, and would look/sound ridiculous.

I'm not a sociologist, but I've sat in a few Karaoke bars in my time around the planet, and choice of song has far more to do with cultural heritage, age, sex and event. I would imagine being a soldier is largely irrelevant, and think you have wasted everybody time to make something that is meaningless.
I agree that nostalgia plays a role for those choosing a karaoke track to sing - hence Grease tracks when really, currently, you might listen to Snoop Dog.

I think the piece is more about the opportunity to share for us civvies to 'share' a moment with a soldier, on a human to human level, outside of the contexts we would 'normally' come across soldiers - like in the new stories about Afghanistan for example.

As a company, we not really interested in what it all 'means' or 'meaning' - we're more interested in people and connections.
 

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