Search for an *Ally* star

_Chimurenga_

LE
Gallery Guru
Not the first time the colorblind have been used in conflict .

There was also a US tanker in WWII who was colourblind and was used in the lead/first tank driving across Europe to Germany as he could spot the difference between live trees and foliage and the dead ones used to cam up German tanks and AT positions.

Rhodesian war , one chap was also used flying around looking at suspected Terr bases as they also used dying foliage as cam.

"Cocky" Benecke was his name.

Peter Petter-Bowyer wrote of him -


"At Station Sick Quarters New Sarum, I asked to have my eyes tested and the results compared with Cocky Benecke’s test results. I was assured that we enjoyed equally good eyesight. I knew that colour-blind people had been used during WWII to detect German camouflaged gun emplacements and tank formations that normal-sighted people could not see. In the eyes of colour-blind individuals, military camouflage has no effect. But Cocky could not have passed his flying medical examinations if he had been colour blind so I could only guess that his colour perception was different from mine, even though he named colours just the same way as the rest of us did. I went to an optician and an oculist to arrange for a variety of tinted and polarised lenses with which to experiment; but none of these helped me see the dark items I had personally placed in the shadow of trees.

Throughout the war Cocky continued to display his uncanny talent. However, it was not only his eyesight that made Cocky a truly exceptional operational pilot. He was aggressive and brave in all that he did, yet never did he become big-headed or arrogant. His happy nature and huge smile endeared him to all.

I questioned every doctor and eye specialist I encountered to try and find out what it was about Cocky’s eyesight that made him one in a million. Doctor Knight eventually gave me the answer in late 1979. He had established that Cocky’s colour perception was slightly defective in the green-brown range. This was why, for Cocky, deep and mottled shadows did not blend out anything that lay in them."
 
"Cocky" Benecke was his name.

Peter Petter-Bowyer wrote of him -


"At Station Sick Quarters New Sarum, I asked to have my eyes tested and the results compared with Cocky Benecke’s test results. I was assured that we enjoyed equally good eyesight. I knew that colour-blind people had been used during WWII to detect German camouflaged gun emplacements and tank formations that normal-sighted people could not see. In the eyes of colour-blind individuals, military camouflage has no effect. But Cocky could not have passed his flying medical examinations if he had been colour blind so I could only guess that his colour perception was different from mine, even though he named colours just the same way as the rest of us did. I went to an optician and an oculist to arrange for a variety of tinted and polarised lenses with which to experiment; but none of these helped me see the dark items I had personally placed in the shadow of trees.

Throughout the war Cocky continued to display his uncanny talent. However, it was not only his eyesight that made Cocky a truly exceptional operational pilot. He was aggressive and brave in all that he did, yet never did he become big-headed or arrogant. His happy nature and huge smile endeared him to all.

I questioned every doctor and eye specialist I encountered to try and find out what it was about Cocky’s eyesight that made him one in a million. Doctor Knight eventually gave me the answer in late 1979. He had established that Cocky’s colour perception was slightly defective in the green-brown range. This was why, for Cocky, deep and mottled shadows did not blend out anything that lay in them."
Is that from Winds of Destruction?

* - Petter Bowyer's cousin Teddy designed the Canberra
 
who's the NIG in the middle with only 3 Ribbons!!!
He has probably got about six bars for each medal and ribbon. In those days it wasn't one medal per war or operation but just a bar for each campaign. Hence soldiers who served in the sixties and seventies under shot and shell in Confrontation in Borneo, Aden and the Radfan, Ulster, and Dhofar on Op Storm only received the 1962 GSM with a bar for each of the subsequent campaigns.

They should have got a seperate campaign medal for each of those wars in my opinion. Every other Army does it.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
There was a R. Sigs chap I knew very well . After basic wanted to do the AACC Comando Course . So the R. Sigs posted him to 216 Paras. After doing the 216 Para course he then went to do the AACC. Had a bit of a hard time this was in 1985/86. As the Marine instructors had a bit of a thing with people wearing Para wings.

He passed anyway .

On our upgrading training in Catterick, he would wear either the Maroon or Green beret with the R.Sigs Jimmy badge , depending on his whim . If any of the Staff asked . “ WTF are you wearing that beret for?”

His answer was … Reg 27 B ,Paragraph 3 states if you have done either course . Para or AACC you can wear the beret as a recruitment advertisement” .

He never had any come back from the DS.

worked out as last time I met him 1999 , he’s was a Captain.
I wouldn't be able to help myself if I were him. I'd wear one, have the other tucked away in a pocket and when whoever I was talking to turned their back, quickly swap them about and repeat ad infinitum. :D
 
Morning All,
From a local 'comic'.
I think these must've been pretty 'ally' back in their day.
20211129_110053~2.jpg


20211206_105557~2.jpg
 

Proff3RTR

War Hero
He has probably got about six bars for each medal and ribbon. In those days it wasn't one medal per war or operation but just a bar for each campaign. Hence soldiers who served in the sixties and seventies under shot and shell in Confrontation in Borneo, Aden and the Radfan, Ulster, and Dhofar on Op Storm only received the 1962 GSM with a bar for each of the subsequent campaigns.

They should have got a seperate campaign medal for each of those wars in my opinion. Every other Army does it.
roger that, my old mans are exactly as you have described, his GSM has NI, Aden so yep, and clearly in context it was meant as a pun/joke so no ill meaning attached.
 
Sgt Juan Segura loading an AMP round into an M1A2 tank. That smile says it all

Soldier-Loading-AMP-Round-768x1024.jpg
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top