Search for an *Ally* star

Good thing he didn't land on a more substantial roof as it's likely he would have been seriously injured. What was the backstory on this incident?

Camp Roberts, mate. Even wiki states that it is used by the NG and the British Army for training.
 
Camp Roberts, mate. Even wiki states that it is used by the NG and the British Army for training.
Well, I know where Camp Roberts is. It's the story behind what made that paratrooper crash into that house is what I'm after. Missed the drop zone did he? :?
 
Well, I know where Camp Roberts is. It's the story behind what made that paratrooper crash into that house is what I'm after. Missed the drop zone did he? :?

Malfunction by all accounts.

Personally I'm wondering why he didn't cutaway and deploy his reserve.
 
If it was a HALO jump would he have time to realise a problem, cutaway and deploy the reserve?

Depends on the height he was at and what the problem was. I read a couple of the local reports and watched a local newscast on the incident, they seemed to indicate it was a canopy malfunction of some kind.

I used to live near, and skydive at Deland which, although a civvy DZ, was a favourite contract training location for many nationalities personnel who use ram air parachutes. Most of what is described as MFF is exactly the same as civvy skydiving just with a rucksack strapped to your arrse and a rifle at your side. They jump at 13,500ft (15K if the pilot is in a good mood) and usually have a minimum fixed deployment height somewhere between 4500ft and 2000ft. The more weight you present to the canopy, the higher up you will start your deployment routine to ensure everything is open in good time, or if not, to deploy your reserve. The whole routine of heights and safety drills are banged into you to ensure safe landings

The other thing is if he had a malfunction and was going beyond the activation speed set into the AAD then the AAD would have set off his reserve. Some nations practice malfunction drills to the extent of cutting away their main and landing on their reserve regularly. I knew a former non-Brit para who was working as a skydive instructor, and was a qualified rigger, who did a cutaway jump every Friday for the practice.

The whole thing was an unfortunate incident, the chap is lucky he only had minor knocks and bangs and effectively walked away to hopefully get back to it again the next day. Seeing someone pile into the ground on a DZ is not a nice experience.
 
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That’s a pretty good overly simplistic view of the man, but millions would disagree with you, hence statues, just as millions see Tecumseh as a hero even though he fought against the US.
Tecumseh was a hero because he fought for the right side - Britain/Canada with our great General Brock and gave the Yanks a good shoeing when they tried to invade Canada along with the Canadian Militia and the single British regular regiment. I can't understand why they have his statue in the US Navy Academy?

Tecumseh.

Anyway I think he deserves his picture in this thread as an Ally star, so here he is:

1200px-Tecumseh02.jpg
BrockandTecumseh.jpg
 
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bentobox

Old-Salt
Depends on the height he was at and what the problem was. I read a couple of the local reports and watched a local newscast on the incident, they seemed to indicate it was a canopy malfunction of some kind.

I used to live near, and skydive at Deland which, although a civvy DZ, was a favourite contract training location for many nationalities personnel who use ram air parachutes. Most of what is described as MFF is exactly the same as civvy skydiving just with a rucksack strapped to your arrse and a rifle at your side. They jump at 13,500ft (15K if the pilot is in a good mood) and usually have a minimum fixed deployment height somewhere between 4500ft and 2000ft. The more weight you present to the canopy, the higher up you will start your deployment routine to ensure everything is open in good time, or if not, to deploy your reserve. The whole routine of heights and safety drills are banged into you to ensure safe landings

The other thing is if he had a malfunction and was going beyond the activation speed set into the AAD then the AAD would have set off his reserve. Some nations practice malfunction drills to the extent of cutting away their main and landing on their reserve regularly. I knew a former non-Brit para who was working as a skydive instructor, and was a qualified rigger, who did a cutaway jump every Friday for the practice.

The whole thing was an unfortunate incident, the chap is lucky he only had minor knocks and bangs and effectively walked away to hopefully get back to it again the next day. Seeing someone pile into the ground on a DZ is not a nice experience.
Interesting, Thanks.
 
The trouser appear to be press studs, male and female. Possibly to allow narrowing of trouser leg bottom to fit into boots or tighten over top of them

Have waterproof trousers with Velcro to do same
Yep, it's "late from the Antipodes" chiming in, again ... re the trouser leg buttons/press-studs: my 'Argentine Ants' uniform issued in 1967 was manufactured early '40s and had the same feature, which some of the old 'n bold Instructors [adorned with WW2 medal ribands] advised the purpose, as mentioned, was to facilitate flyng-boot wearing/fitting. In our case, it made fitting/wearing gaiters over our boots much easier also.
 
This Ally star needs no introduction. One of the best 'This is your life episodes. Rudolf Witzig of Eban Emael fame appears in the first episode. His daughter was quite fit as well.

8432150817140622g.jpg




 
Below, a copy of a hospital admission report by the US Navy.

I've posted it here 'cos any man who can get ratted on shellac and coal oil is well ally in my book:

View attachment 594663
For anyone else having difficulty reading the writing it looks like the following:

This man is a chronic debauche (?). He will get drunk on anything that will have that effect. Shellac and coal oil are among the articles he has used. At present he is considerably shattered (?) and needs building up. He is totally untrustworthy and has to be watched. Any resemblance to posters on ARRSE is purely coincidental.
 
"It's ok Sarge, I've got the 6 o'clock covered"

48641136e7a5172cc6e273f50c2553d1.jpg
 
1628490826905.png


"There's no damned way that helicopter's going to steal our popcorn..."
 
"It's ok Sarge, I've got the 6 o'clock covered"

View attachment 595178
Dope(s) on a rope. I've seen 101st Air Assault types practising this maneuver before, but not quite so many blokes hanging on a rope at one time. Their sergeants growl with satisfaction though if the set piece is well done. :?
 

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