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On the theme of Ally Yanks:

US paratrooper Joseph Beryle served with the 101st Airborne Division during World War II. Prior to the start of the Normandy invasions, Beryle jumped twice into occupied France to coordinate, provide arms, and money to several French resistance units. He then jumped into France on D-Day, destroyed a enemy gun emplacement, was captured, escaped, and captured again. He was beaten nearly to death, his uniform and dog tags were taken from him. A German soldier attempted to infiltrate US lines dressed in Beryle's uniform and was killed. The US War Department believed Beryle had been killed in combat and notified his parents. His mother refused to believe her son was dead and continued to ignore the calls from the family to accept his death.

Beryle was taken into captivity at an German controlled POW camp. He attempted to escape and was shot and wounded. He survived on minumum food and medical attention. Beryle would be held in seven different POW camps and escaped again, this time the Gestapo was ready to shot him, claiming he was a spy. He escaped again and found his way to a Soviet armor brigade which was near the POW camp. Beryle having knowledge of engines and mechanical background assisted the Soviet tank unit which was equipped with American made M4 Shermans. He served with armor unit commanded by a Soviet female officer and acted as a scout for the Russians against German positions. He was wounded again when German dive bombers attacked the Russian armor column.

He was taken to a Soviet hospital where he met Soviet Marshall Zhukov who was curious on how this American paratrooper ended up in a Soviet hospital. Zhukov was so impressed with Beryle's story he provided safe passage back to the US Embassy in Moscow.

Due to the US War Department believing Beryle had been killed back in June 1944, the US government kept him under guard for several days until his dental records confirmed he was indeed Beryle. Beryle served more combat time with the Soviets than the Americans and recieved both US and Soviet citations.

Beryle returned home and married his sweatheart by the same priest who two years earlier had held his funeral when his family believed he was dead.

Here is Joseph Beryle's Prisoner of War picture after he was captured again by the Germans.

JBeyrlePOW.jpg
 

engr172

War Hero
Book Reviewer
On the theme of Ally Yanks:

US paratrooper Joseph Beryle served with the 101st Airborne Division during World War II. Prior to the start of the Normandy invasions, Beryle jumped twice into occupied France to coordinate, provide arms, and money to several French resistance units. He then jumped into France on D-Day, destroyed a enemy gun emplacement, was captured, escaped, and captured again. He was beaten nearly to death, his uniform and dog tags were taken from him. A German soldier attempted to infiltrate US lines dressed in Beryle's uniform and was killed. The US War Department believed Beryle had been killed in combat and notified his parents. His mother refused to believe her son was dead and continued to ignore the calls from the family to accept his death.

Beryle was taken into captivity at an German controlled POW camp. He attempted to escape and was shot and wounded. He survived on minumum food and medical attention. Beryle would be held in seven different POW camps and escaped again, this time the Gestapo was ready to shot him, claiming he was a spy. He escaped again and found his way to a Soviet armor brigade which was near the POW camp. Beryle having knowledge of engines and mechanical background assisted the Soviet tank unit which was equipped with American made M4 Shermans. He served with armor unit commanded by a Soviet female officer and acted as a scout for the Russians against German positions. He was wounded again when German dive bombers attacked the Russian armor column.

He was taken to a Soviet hospital where he met Soviet Marshall Zhukov who was curious on how this American paratrooper ended up in a Soviet hospital. Zhukov was so impressed with Beryle's story he provided safe passage back to the US Embassy in Moscow.

Due to the US War Department believing Beryle had been killed back in June 1944, the US government kept him under guard for several days until his dental records confirmed he was indeed Beryle. Beryle served more combat time with the Soviets than the Americans and recieved both US and Soviet citations.

Beryle returned home and married his sweatheart by the same priest who two years earlier had held his funeral when his family believed he was dead.

Here is Joseph Beryle's Prisoner of War picture after he was captured again by the Germans.

View attachment 521326
i read a book about this loonball
 
Yep, that's what I thought. I have never fired a Galil but have handled one. ARM, bloody heavy old thing.

perhaps the least convenient bottle opener I ever had occasion to use since you have to hold the 4.35 kg weapon level and upright while holding the bottle with the other hand underneath the weapon where the opener is - well that's if you didn't want to get your soda pop all over the weapon...
 
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Odd one to my non airborne mind. Why does he have is wings on his stripes, yet his mate has them on the shoulder? Taken 18 days before D Day apparently .
 

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ugly

LE
Moderator
Odd one to my non airborne mind. Why does he have is wings on his stripes, yet his mate has them on the shoulder? Taken 18 days before D Day apparently .
His mate doesn’t have stripes

I know what you mean though
 
The Reconnassaince Teams consisted of 3 Americans and 5 Yards. They were issued CAR-15's except for the point man who would be a Yard dressed in NVA uniform armed with an AK-47. The teams were named after an American State - i.e. RT Idaho. They operated against the Ho Chi Minh trail in Laos and Cambodia.

All their kit was sterile. No dog tags, labels on uniform, serial numbers on weopons etc.

Cut down m79 also.
One of John Stryker Myers pods he lists the kit.
Worth noting also that the Car/M16 had a 20rd mag!


Edit. Have found a quote from JSM on Sofrep, explaining his kit.

The most important piece of equipment we carried was the CAR-15. The sling for it would vary: sometimes I used a cravat or a canvas strap taped tightly to both ends of the weapon for soundless movements. That was the preferred weapon of choice by everyone on ST Idaho. The only exception was an AK-47 for Son when he was our point man wearing an NVA uniform, and an M-79 carried by our grenadier. In November 1968, Henry King carried the experimental pump M-79 weapon on one mission. It held up to five rounds of 40 mm high explosive ammunition. His secondary weapon was the Model 1911 Colt .45. On occasions, Black would carry the M-60 machine gun.

Every American on ST Idaho carried a sawed-off M-79 for additional firepower. We thought of it as our hand-held artillery. During a patrol, the Americans would load a special M-79 round with flechettes or double-ought (00) buckshot for close contact. The sawed-off M-79 would be secured either with a canvas or rope lanyard or a D-ring that was covered with black electrical tape to prevent any metallic banging. During the fall of 1968, I had a one-of-a-kind sawed-off M-79 holster, which I lost it when I was unconscious after a rope extraction in Laos.

I would carry at least thirty-four 20-round magazines for the CAR-15 – we only placed 18 rounds in each magazine, which gave me 612 rounds for that weapon, and at least 12 rounds for the M-79. The CAR-15 magazines were placed in ammo pouches or cloth canteen pouches, with the bottoms facing up to prevent debris from getting into the magazine and all of the rounds pointing away from the body. We taped black electrical tape to the bottom of each magazine to make it easier to grab them out of the pouch during firefights. I also carried 10 to 12 fragmentation grenades, a few of the older M-26, the newer M-33 “baseball” grenades and one or two V-22 mini-grenades.
 
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TamH70

MIA

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Wasn't he widely despised in the British Army?
No, that was RSM Britain who was a blimp-sized büllshitting buffoon.

John Lord was the real deal.
 

TamH70

MIA
No, that was RSM Britain who was a blimp-sized büllshitting buffoon.

John Lord was the real deal.

Sorry, my mistake then.
 
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