Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Search for an *Ally* star

1980 We still had the ????? cannot remember what we called them but some were displaced in the Second World War working for the Army , bottle washers and plate cleaners, even used to come on exercise with us.

MOJOs. Ex-Polish soldiers who couldn't go back. They drove tank transporters for BAOR. Almost as strange is that there is an MoD home for ex-Polish Forces just off the A38 at the turn-off for Newton Abbot. See Ilford Park: Ilford Park Polish Home.
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
Another (somewhat) Jewish soldier was VC winner John Patrick Kenneally of the Irish Guards, celebrated in a speech by Churchill for the role of the Irish who fought in WWII.

Eh? Doesn't sound very Jewish.

In fact former deserter Leslie Jackson, as far was we can tell, had not the slightest connection with the Emerald Isle but was in fact the illegitimate son of a Mancunian Jewish textile manufacturer.

General Alexander (himself a Mick) attaches the ribbon of the VC to Kenneally's chest in Tunisia.
RSM McLoughlin keeps a beady eye on things.

1601048764329.png
 
Last edited:

Bodenplatte

War Hero
1980 We still had the ????? cannot remember what we called them but some were displaced in the Second World War working for the Army , bottle washers and plate cleaners, even used to come on exercise with us.
MSO - Mixed Service Organisation, or "Mojos". They fulfilled a number of roles in BAOR, many being tank transporter drivers. Others formed armed guard companies at larger formation headquarters. They wore dark blue battledress, and those at JHQ Rheindahlen were smartly turned out with white webbing, pistol holsters and anklets.

Just a part of life in the old BAOR.
 
Yes - and they're always so modest.
Many stories about my friend's adventures. When the Soviets deported him with his family, the rail journey to Siberia took three weeks. He was a Boy Scout, and used his clasp knife to dig a hole in the wooden floor of the railway wagon for the occupants to use as a toilet.
When he was badly wounded at Bologna he was a Radio Op in the back seat of a Universal Carrier when it hit an A/T mine which completely mangled the little vehicle and killed the commander and driver. He was thrown clear, suffering a badly broken leg. He still needs a built up shoe.

And then Attlee's government, to appease the Soviets, would not allow the Free Poles to take part in the Victory Parade in London.

I interviewed a member of 303 Squadron many years ago. He and his Polish comrades were also banned from taking part and could only watch from the sidelines in civvies. This, of course, was in spite of the 60 kills attributed to the Squadron during the Battle of Britain, resulting in the highest kill to loss ratio of the nearly 4 month period.
 

Niamac

GCM
Others formed armed guard companies at larger formation headquarters.
They went about with fixed bayonets all the time and the local boxheads were terrified of them.
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
They went about with fixed bayonets all the time and the local boxheads were terrified of them.
Certainly don’t remember that. Most of them were not armed, only the Guard Companies at JHQ and the HQ 1 (BR) Corps at Bielefeld, and they had pistols. In fact I think they were stuck with .380 Enfield revolvers.
 
Certainly don’t remember that. Most of them were not armed, only the Guard Companies at JHQ and the HQ 1 (BR) Corps at Bielefeld, and they had pistols. In fact I think they were stuck with .380 Enfield revolvers.

They used to do the GOC's house and other security duties around the Garrison area. Bracht also had some doing security. Always pleasant blokes to work with and be around.

If you remember the industrial level of lawn mowing that went on around the JHQ garrison over the summer months you might be surprised to know that many of them were Polish too. I found out one day when I was walking across one of the major grassed areas and passed by a few of them were taking their lunch break. I gave a standard, "mahlzeit" greeting and was answered in damn fine English. A few of them were university lecturers in Poland and managed to come down for the work leaving their families behind. They earned more over their summer holiday mowing grass for us than they earnt the rest of the year teaching in a communist university - plus they used to take back shiny things like tinned food and Levi's to sell on the black market.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Another (somewhat) Jewish soldier was VC winner John Patrick Kenneally of the Irish Guards, celebrated in a speech by Churchill for the role of the Irish who fought in WWII.

Eh? Doesn't sound very Jewish.

In fact former deserter Leslie Jackson, as far was we can tell, had not the slightest connection with the Emerald Isle but was in fact the illegitimate son of a Mancunian Jewish textile manufacturer.


The Jewish dental officer I mentioned above was Irish.
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
They used to do the GOC's house and other security duties around the Garrison area. Bracht also had some doing security. Always pleasant blokes to work with and be around.

If you remember the industrial level of lawn mowing that went on around the JHQ garrison over the summer months you might be surprised to know that many of them were Polish too. I found out one day when I was walking across one of the major grassed areas and passed by a few of them were taking their lunch break. I gave a standard, "mahlzeit" greeting and was answered in damn fine English. A few of them were university lecturers in Poland and managed to come down for the work leaving their families behind. They earned more over their summer holiday mowing grass for us than they earnt the rest of the year teaching in a communist university - plus they used to take back shiny things like tinned food and Levi's to sell on the black market.

The lawn mowers and the like were recruited into other organisations, the PCLUs which I think stood for Pioneer Civil Labour Units, and the MCLGs (Mobile Civil Labour Groups.) I am surprised to hear that people from the other side of the Iron Curtain were recruited and allowed to travel West - or are you talking about post Curtain ?
 
MOJOs. Ex-Polish soldiers who couldn't go back. They drove tank transporters for BAOR. Almost as strange is that there is an MoD home for ex-Polish Forces just off the A38 at the turn-off for Newton Abbot. See Ilford Park: Ilford Park Polish Home.
sure one of the Kineton ATs will correct if i'm wrong, but sure there was polish camp of nissen huts up to the 60s, where the bonfire was held every year when i was there in the 90s
 
The lawn mowers and the like were recruited into other organisations, the PCLUs which I think stood for Pioneer Civil Labour Units, and the MCLGs (Mobile Civil Labour Groups.) I am surprised to hear that people from the other side of the Iron Curtain were recruited and allowed to travel West - or are you talking about post Curtain ?

While the curtain was still firmly drawn.

The Polish did not seem as strict as the Russians they used to more or less let individual family members out - effectively leaving behind the bulk of their family as defacto hostages to their return. Two of my mates from the police back in the late 70's had Polish parents who arrived as a result of WW2, and I used to get [willingly] dragged to the Polish functions - try being the [atheist] English best man at a Polish language catholic wedding. Both families had the occasional relative who would come over to the UK and they would go over more or less annually with loaded up cars and trailers.

There were also the occasional Polish builders gangs that would turn up in the UK to do specific projects before the wall came down. A lucrative activity fot them as they would earn more wonga in a few weeks than they would back home for months of work.

I don't know if the JHQ ones were recruited through PCLU, or if it was a third party company on contract through PCLU.

Being one of those anally retentive people with a PV I mentioned my meeting at the time to a couple of people and just effectively got shrugs. One of my people was the son of one of JHQ's uniformed British security contingent who had lived on JHQ for most of his life. I mentioned it to him and he basically said, "yeah, they come down every year for the summer and then go back to Poland". From the feedback I received it seemed pretty well known and as long as they were not in the compound it appeared ok with everyone.
 
Yes - and they're always so modest.
Many stories about my friend's adventures. When the Soviets deported him with his family, the rail journey to Siberia took three weeks. He was a Boy Scout, and used his clasp knife to dig a hole in the wooden floor of the railway wagon for the occupants to use as a toilet.
When he was badly wounded at Bologna he was a Radio Op in the back seat of a Universal Carrier when it hit an A/T mine which completely mangled the little vehicle and killed the commander and driver. He was thrown clear, suffering a badly broken leg. He still needs a built up shoe.

And then Attlee's government, to appease the Soviets, would not allow the Free Poles to take part in the Victory Parade in London.



My bold .. I think most chaps who served in the wars were.
I met a good few, some were teachers in my school. My 2nd headmaster was an ex RAF Sqdn. Ldr. with the DFC, he had served in Burma, it only came out as he was filling in teaching (& failing) us Latin and there was a picture of an ox cart in one of the text books. "I saw something like that in Burma" he said, prompting numerous questions from us, every time he filled in, (anything to avoid the dreaded Latin).
Our next HM was ex Lt. Cmdr. RNVR with a DSC, he was on MGB's/MTB's out of Harwich, he was much more tight lipped and we learnt virtually nothing about him.
Another chap, a Sales Manager for a company I dealt with for almost 10 years was with me on a flight to Edinburgh and we had a particularly bad/bumpy landing due to v. strong gusty winds. "That was the worst landing I have had since Arnhem" he said! Turns out he was one of the glider pilots, I never heard him mention it again!
 

Niamac

GCM
Certainly don’t remember that. Most of them were not armed, only the Guard Companies at JHQ and the HQ 1 (BR) Corps at Bielefeld, and they had pistols. In fact I think they were stuck with .380 Enfield revolvers.
1 BR Corp Headquarters in the field in the mid 1960s
 

QRK2

LE
My bold .. I think most chaps who served in the wars were.
I met a good few, some were teachers in my school. My 2nd headmaster was an ex RAF Sqdn. Ldr. with the DFC, he had served in Burma, it only came out as he was filling in teaching (& failing) us Latin and there was a picture of an ox cart in one of the text books. "I saw something like that in Burma" he said, prompting numerous questions from us, every time he filled in, (anything to avoid the dreaded Latin).
Our next HM was ex Lt. Cmdr. RNVR with a DSC, he was on MGB's/MTB's out of Harwich, he was much more tight lipped and we learnt virtually nothing about him.
Another chap, a Sales Manager for a company I dealt with for almost 10 years was with me on a flight to Edinburgh and we had a particularly bad/bumpy landing due to v. strong gusty winds. "That was the worst landing I have had since Arnhem" he said! Turns out he was one of the glider pilots, I never heard him mention it again!

With the drawdown of Ops in Iraq and AFG there has been an appreciable influx into the independent sector at least of graduates of those conflicts, nothing like the scale of post Second War of course, but I know of an ex-Bootie Head of Science, and ex EOD & Search DT teacher and an ex SFSG Head of Geography around us.
 
My bold .. I think most chaps who served in the wars were.
I met a good few, some were teachers in my school. My 2nd headmaster was an ex RAF Sqdn. Ldr. with the DFC, he had served in Burma, it only came out as he was filling in teaching (& failing) us Latin and there was a picture of an ox cart in one of the text books. "I saw something like that in Burma" he said, prompting numerous questions from us, every time he filled in, (anything to avoid the dreaded Latin).
Our next HM was ex Lt. Cmdr. RNVR with a DSC, he was on MGB's/MTB's out of Harwich, he was much more tight lipped and we learnt virtually nothing about him.
Another chap, a Sales Manager for a company I dealt with for almost 10 years was with me on a flight to Edinburgh and we had a particularly bad/bumpy landing due to v. strong gusty winds. "That was the worst landing I have had since Arnhem" he said! Turns out he was one of the glider pilots, I never heard him mention it again!
My Latin teacher, also taught French but not to me, had been in SOE during the war. I learnt enough tactics to command a legion but not enough to give the orders.

Sent from my SM-T510 using Tapatalk
 
And his former bosses aren't happy bunnies about it. (Caution: Daily Mail link follows)

SAS hero who received a bravery medal after defeating jihadis quits
Mike, anybody can set up an instagram account and claim to be the Nairobi blade. I don't think the real Nairobi punisher had time to take photos when he was slotting Al Shabaabs finest. Mark Nichol comes up with one of these type of stories every couple of months.

Does anyone know if there any many balconies in Nairobi.
 
Mike, anybody can set up an instagram account and claim to be the Nairobi blade. I don't think the real Nairobi punisher had time to take photos when he was slotting Al Shabaabs finest. Mark Nichol comes up with one of these type of stories every couple of months.

Does anyone know if there any many balconies in Nairobi.
Surely the fact that they identify his partner, a socialite photographer, would be enough to confirm whether he is genuine or not? Or are you suggesting the entire Insta is fake?
 

Latest Threads

Top