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Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
I'm having a bit of difficulty finding the background to some of them as some sources dispute who the 'man with the book' is. But suffice to say that someone I know tends to his grave in Arnhem (There is a photo, but it was posted on a private forum, so I won't post it here). Some accounts say the book was a 'guestbook' for the hotel in the background.

All their names are tagged in the link below:

Much appreciated thank you
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Interesting - Capt Stanley Cairns' gravestone has a Star of David, so I wonder if, perhaps, the people in the photo were Jewish members of 21st Independent Parachute Company.

As you say, being a Jewish POW must have been very difficult
If I recall they were given "English" names etc so as not to be ID'd as Jewish if captured
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Interesting - Capt Stanley Cairns' gravestone has a Star of David, so I wonder if, perhaps, the people in the photo were Jewish members of 21st Independent Parachute Company.

As you say, being a Jewish POW must have been very difficult

Captain Julius Green, of The Dental Corps describes the perils well in

He made it even more risky by developing a system of communicating with the UK from the camps.
The Germans knew he was guilty of something but just could not prove anything so sent him to Colditz.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Captain Julius Green, of The Dental Corps describes the perils well in

He made it even more risky by developing a system of communicating with the UK from the camps.
The Germans knew he was guilty of something but just could not prove anything so sent him to Colditz.
That'll lern 'im.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
That'll lern 'im.

In an attempt to secure his safety, he had to feign insanity in order to obtain repatriation to the UK.
He was declared insane but the war ended before a journey back to the UK could be arranged.
 
In an attempt to secure his safety, he had to feign insanity in order to obtain repatriation to the UK.
He was declared insane but the war ended before a journey back to the UK could be arranged.

An event that was acknowledged in an episode of 'Colditz', many (many!) years ago.

It ended badly as the chap who elected to give it a go took it to such a depth that he did, indeed, develop a deep paranoia.
 
Captain Julius Green, of The Dental Corps describes the perils well in

He made it even more risky by developing a system of communicating with the UK from the camps.
The Germans knew he was guilty of something but just could not prove anything so sent him to Colditz.
He was just filling in time in captivity.
 

Oyibo

LE
If I recall they were given "English" names etc so as not to be ID'd as Jewish if captured

You're right (as is @FourZeroCharlie) - I edited my previous post after looking at the tombstone again: 'Hans Rosenfeld who Served as 14623901 Cpl JP Rodley'

If I had heard about the noms de guerre before, I had certainly forgotten about them
 
First time I've seen this one - 21st Independent Parachute Company during Operation Market Garden:

View attachment 506966
From a book I have which was published in 1985 it states:

Pictured here are members of 1 Platoon, 21 Independent Parachute Company, with two glider pilots on the Arnhem perimeter near the Stationsweg. The photograph was taken on 22 September 1944 and standing from left to right are the two pilots ; Sgt Binnoick (with head veil) ; Pte Gillespie; Pte McCausland; Pte Cameron (died of wounds at Arnhem; and Cpl Rodley (killed the next day) . Kneeling are Sgt Swallow ( died of wounds at Apeldoorn on 13 December) and sniper Pte Jeffreys.

Warning : The information comes from the book - Uniforms Illustrated No 10 The Paras, The British Parachute Regiment James G Shortt. Published in 1985 by Arms and Armour Press.

Athough people may think it automatically suspect as it published by the notorious Baron Shortt, who in the foreword claims that he is a former Para, he does go on to thank Major G Norton (ret) and Mr T.H. Fitch BEM, curator and custodian respectively of the Airborne Forces Museum at RHQ, The Parachute Regiment, Browning Barracks, Aldershot; all photographs reproduced here are by courtesy of The Parachute Regiment and Airborne Forces Museum.

Sadly both Major Norton and Tom Fitch are both long deceased but in 1983 while on AAPC we were taken on a tour of the old Airborne Forces Museum at Browning Barracks are were guided around by Tom Fitch who gave an excellent tour. Tom was an ex WW2 Paratrooper and was passionate about his job - more of a calling.

I am sure you must have met him when you were at Depot Para, Oiybo?
 
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Interesting - Capt Stanley Cairns Cpl John Rodley's gravestone has a Star of David, so I wonder if, perhaps, the people in the photo were Jewish members of 21st Independent Parachute Company.

As you say, being a Jewish POW must have been very difficult

ETA Correction above and:

His tombstone says that he was 'Hans Rosenfeld who Served as 14623901 Cpl JP Rodley'. So I'm guessing that Jewish people had their religions disguised for obvious reasone
He was likely an enemy alien, a German or Austrian Jew who was either living in the UK or escaped Nazi Germany prior to the outbreak of war. When the war started they were all interned. In 1942 they were allowed to join the Pioneer Corp.

Later about 1944 they were allowed to join other units with many going to Airborne Troops and Commandos as well as the RAC. Ten Commando X Troop was composed of German/Austrian jews. They were all given false names and backgrounds for obvious reasons. Several were captured by the Germans in the NW European campaign but their real identities were not discovered.

British Jews serving in the British Armed Forces who were captured by the Germans in the various campaigns kept their identities and religion and were treated the same as any other POW in accordance with the Geneva Convention as they were under the protection of the Wehrmact or Luftwaffe. Regiments such as the KRRC, the East Surreys, Rifle Brigade and the Middlesex who recruited from East London had a large number of Jewish soldiers.
 

Oyibo

LE
From a book a have which was published in 1985 it states:

Pictured here are members of 1 Platoon, 21 Independent Parachute Company, with two glider pilots on the Arnhem perimeter near the Stationsweg. The photograph was taken non 22 September 1944 and standing from left to right are the two pilots ; Sgt Binnoick (with head veil) ; Pte Gillespie; pte McCausland; Pte Cameron (died of wounds at Arnhem; and Cpl Rodley (killed the next day) . Kneeling are Sgt Swallow ( died of wounds at Apeldoorn on 13 December) and sniper Pte Jeffreys.

Warning : The information comes from the book - Uniforms Illustrated No 10 The Paras, The British Parachute Regiment James G Shortt. Published in 1985 by Arms and Armour Press.

Athough people may think it automaticallysuspect as it published by the notorious Baron Shortt, who in the foreword claims that he is a former Para, he does go on to thank Major G Norton (ret) and Mr T.H. Fitch BEM, curator and custodian respectively of the Airborne Forces Museum at RHQ, The Parachute Regiment, Browning Barracks, Aldershot; all photographs reproduced here are by courtesy of The Parachute Regiment and Airborne Forces Museum.

Sadly both Major Norton and Tom Fitch are both long deceased but in 1983 while on AAPC we were taken on a tour of the old Airborne Forces Museum at Browning Barracks are were guided around by Tom Fitch who gave an excellent tour. Tom was an ex WW2 Paratrooper and was passionate about his job - more of a calling.

I am sure you must have met him when you were at Depot Para, Oiybo?


I very probably did meet him, but I really can't remember the name. We were taken around the museum by someone in the early stages of basic training, but with an intake of about 80-odd there was not too much time for Q&As. I did subsequently visit many times afterwards, and the displays that really stuck in my mind were the incredibly detailed models of the Normandy countryside and the description of how orientation films were made for the glider pilots by suspending cameras on wires over the models on the approach line for landing. Incredible.

Baron Shortt - he gets around!!
 

Oyibo

LE
He was likely an enemy alien, a German or Austrian Jew who was either living in the UK or escaped Nazi Germany prior to the outbreak of war. When the war started they were all interned. In 1942 they were allowed to join the Pioneer Corp.

Later about 1944 they were allowed to join other units with many going to Airborne Troops and Commandos as well as the RAC. Ten Commando X Troop was composed of German/Austrian jews. They were all given false names and backgrounds for obvious reasons. Several were captured by the Germans in the NW European campaign but their real identities were not discovered.

British Jews serving in the British Armed Forces who were captured by the Germans in the various campaigns kept their identities and religion and were treated the same as any other POW in accordance with the Geneva Convention as they were under the protection of the Wehrmact or Luftwaffe. Regiments such as the KRRC, the East Surreys, Rifle Brigade and the Middlesex who recruited from East London had a large number of Jewish soldiers.

The Paradata link:


Another link (not sure of the accuracy):


His gravestone at Oosterbeek:

1600976037353.png
 
Regiments such as the KRRC, the East Surreys, Rifle Brigade and the Middlesex who recruited from East London had a large number of Jewish soldiers.

Your post made me think because my father was in A Coy 2KRRC and among his many stories about the unit, I do not recall mention of other Jews. Fortunately he's with us (age 106) so I made a quick call from Tel Aviv to London and he told me that he recalls five Jews in A Coy (120 men). He was born in Blighty but his parents arrived from Russia in 1902.
 
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Your post made me think because my father was in A Coy 2KRRC and among his many stories about the unit, I do not recall mention of other Jews. Fortunately he's with us (age 106) so I made a quick call from Tel Aviv to London and he told me that he recalls five Jews in A Coy (120 men). He was born in Blighty but his parents arrived from Russia in 1902.

[Fred Riff] You'll be aware that, during the first unpleasantness, Jewish men formed 5 complete Battalions of the Royal Fusiliers (38th to 42nd (Service) Bns RF)?

Several interesting pages of history out there . . .

[/Fred Riff]
 

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