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Fang_Farrier

LE
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Came up on a local history page.

Epitomizes nonchalance.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
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Book Reviewer
Safe in the knowledge that he will never need to face an iron wielded in anger.
Flew Spitfires from 1939 to 1945, believe that excuses ironing!

John Brown Niven was born and brought up in Edinburgh. After an education at George Heriot's school he joined the family roofing business, John Low Slaters. However, his passion, since a schoolboy, had been flying, and he successfully applied to join the RAF Volunteer Reserve in June 1939 at the age of nineteen. He applied to study flying at RAF Cranwell College and was accepted, but before taking up his place, he was called up for war in September.

During the war years he had distinguished service in the RAF, flying Spitfires in the UK, Indian and Japan. He was Squadron Leader in the 602 City of Glasgow Squadron and 485 New Zealand Squadron. He also flew with 322 Dutch Squadron. For his courageous efforts he was awarded the DFC (Distinguished Flying Cross) and bar.
 

k613

War Hero
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Commonwealth troops at the battle of Kohima. Check out the bloke cleaning the Thompson.
 
That THING at the front! WHITE socks jail hiim! I can't believe nobody else saw them.
I saw, but I didn't want to embarrass all the Paras.
 

Oyibo

LE
I saw, but I didn't want to embarrass all the Paras.
As far as I remember they were the cream coloured issue socks. Maroon socks were obligatory in the Reg though
 

Fang_Farrier

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That is one hell of a good photo on many levels. Zoom in - it is still sharp.

Look at the uniforms, weapons, body attitudes of the various individuals.

Indians ? Gurkhas ?
IIRC there were Indians, Burmese, Ghurkas (both UK and Nepalese Army)
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
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The poor bugger looks as if he's somewhere else.

What are all those things that look like huge square stick grenades?
The photo is captioned "23rd Division troops inspect captured Japanese ordnance, Imphal, 1944"
On the National Army museum website.
 
Am putting this here primarily for his beret (it wasn't why he was receiving the Congressional Medal of Honour) as have never seen a beret presented like that.

He was first submariner to receive such an award, due to not abandoning his sinking ship because another sailor was trapped and couldn't escape.

Article


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Am putting this here primarily for his beret (it wasn't why he was receiving the Congressional Medal of Honour) as have never seen a beret presented like that.

He was first submariner to receive such an award, due to not abandoning his sinking ship because another sailor was trapped and couldn't escape.

Article


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It’s not a beret, it’s a traditional sailors cap, albeit a very wide brimmed one.
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
The US Navy continued to issue the flat cap up with a tally until the 1960s, though the size of the crown was reduced over the years, and was made less stiff to become a crush cap style. It was commonly worn until the early years of WW2, but then began to be replaced by the familiar Dixie Cup.

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The five Sullivan brothers on USS Juneau in 1942.
 

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