Search for an *Ally* star

Bill Speakman was BW att 1KOSB when he won his Cross, though he subsequently transferred permanently. He had a lot of ups and downs in life, that's for sure.
Interestingly enough, in the same action where Speakman won the VC, there was another attached individual in the battalion who became the last British soldier to be tried and convicted by Court Martial for the offence of cowardice.
Fusilier Patrick Lydon, Royal Northumberland Fusiliers, court-martialled at Catterick October 1953.
The BW had taken over from the Argyles who were part of 27 Inf Bde originally sent from HK. 1 RNF who had been part of the original British 29th Brigade sent out to Korea from the UK in 1950 just in time to meet the full force of the offensive by the Chinese Peaples Volunteers in November. In a horrendously cold Korean winter they were forced to retreat back past Seoul to Osan about 40K south of Seoul with the Brigade carrying out many rearguard actions. They then took part in the 1951 Spring offensive which recaptured Seoul and the Battle of the Imjin River in April 1951 where the Gloucesters were overun.

The Gloucesters, RUF, and RNF were on the point of being relieved when 1 RNF fought in the first battle of Maryang-San with 3 RAR. Suffering 16 killed and 94 wounded just days before they were due to be relieved and return home in their last battle as a battalion.

There is not much on Fusilier Lydon on the internet. Was he a BCR or had he been with the battalion since its arrival in Korea? On his return from the POW camp he insisted on a Court Martial and was sentenced to a year imprisonment but released immediatly having been a POW for 18 months. Was he a genuine coward or had he just had enough and cracked up.

First battle of Maryang-San

Fusiler Patrick Lydon

Fusiler Patrick Lydon.
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
There is not much on Fusilier Lydon on the internet. Was he a BCR or had he been with the battalion since its arrival in Korea? On his return from the POW camp he insisted on a Court Martial and was sentenced to a year imprisonment but released immediatly having been a POW for 18 months. Was he a genuine coward or had he just had enough and cracked up.

First battle of Maryang-San

Fusiler Patrick Lydon

Fusiler Patrick Lydon.
Lydon remained in Korea after 1 RNF departed. It seems the reason for this was to complete a designated tour, so presumably he had not been with the battalion since its arrival in Korea. He was attached to 1 KOSB.

It's not for me to say whether he was a "genuine coward." The Court Martial was satisfied that he was. Evidence was that he lay whimpering in the bottom of slit trenches, refusing to stand, and calling out "I surrender" in Chinese. He was waving a leaflet which had been produced by the Chinese to encourage UN troops to surrender.
There was a telling moment in the trial when his platoon commander was asked by the defence "Did it not occur to you that he was gripped by terrible fear ?" and the Lieutenant answered "We were all gripped by terrible fear." (This is from memory, and the words shown in quotes are the gist of what was said, and will not be exact.)

As you say, his sentence was immediately fully remitted, and he was discharged and returned to his home town in Middlesbrough where he was widely and warmly welcomed.
 
Last edited:
The BW had taken over from the Argyles who were part of 27 Inf Bde originally sent from HK. 1 RNF who had been part of the original British 29th Brigade sent out to Korea from the UK in 1950 just in time to meet the full force of the offensive by the Chinese Peaples Volunteers in November. In a horrendously cold Korean winter they were forced to retreat back past Seoul to Osan about 40K south of Seoul with the Brigade carrying out many rearguard actions. They then took part in the 1951 Spring offensive which recaptured Seoul and the Battle of the Imjin River in April 1951 where the Gloucesters were overun.

The Gloucesters, RUF, and RNF were on the point of being relieved when 1 RNF fought in the first battle of Maryang-San with 3 RAR. Suffering 16 killed and 94 wounded just days before they were due to be relieved and return home in their last battle as a battalion.

There is not much on Fusilier Lydon on the internet. Was he a BCR or had he been with the battalion since its arrival in Korea? On his return from the POW camp he insisted on a Court Martial and was sentenced to a year imprisonment but released immediatly having been a POW for 18 months. Was he a genuine coward or had he just had enough and cracked up.

First battle of Maryang-San

Fusiler Patrick Lydon

Fusiler Patrick Lydon.
I must say, he doesn't look too worried in that photo. And twenty five seems old for a National Serviceman, was he a regular?
 
I must say, he doesn't look too worried in that photo. And twenty five seems old for a National Serviceman, was he a regular?
I would have thought so. Anyway who are we to judge. Was this his first time in action? It was a pretty savage war. Complete companies, battalions and regiments were overrun. You just have to read the account of the first battle of Maryang-San. De La Billiere gives an account in his autobiography when he was with the DLI in Korea as a young subbie in 1953, when during a big battle on the 'Hook' one of their star parade ground soldiers- a Corporal did the same as Lydon.

Lydon seems to have requested a Court Martial. It could be that more was expected of him as a regular than an NS. There were a lot of left wing elements in the UK against Britains particapation in Korea which is probably why he was released immediatly and got a big reception at home.. These days he would be writing regular features in the Guardian on the military.
 
Bill Speakman was BW att 1KOSB when he won his Cross, though he subsequently transferred permanently. He had a lot of ups and downs in life, that's for sure.
Interestingly enough, in the same action where Speakman won the VC, there was another attached individual in the battalion who became the last British soldier to be tried and convicted by Court Martial for the offence of cowardice.
Fusilier Patrick Lydon, Royal Northumberland Fusiliers, court-martialled at Catterick October 1953.

Sadly Bill is no longer alive to refute he was BW attached when he was awarded his VC... you're correct about the soldier tried by Court Martial for cowardice from the same company though.
 


cut and pasted from Faceach but nice to see crabair can look as ally as any.


Flight Lieutenant David Morgan

Flight Lieutenant David Morgan, He was credited with sinking one enemy vessel as well as shooting down two helicopters and two A-4 Skyhawks While unloading on 8 June, the British ships were attacked by two waves of A-4 Skyhawks from the Argentine Air Force's 5th Air Brigade, each of them loaded with three 500 lb retarding tail bombs of Spanish design. The fighters departed from Rio Gallegos airbase, which at the time was monitored by the nuclear submarine HMS Splendid.

The first package, originally made of eight aircraft, was reduced to five when three Skyhawks returned to base due to refuelling problems. The nuclear submarine HMS Valiant, on picket duty off Rio Grande, was able to track six Dagger fighters taking off from the airbase there for a complementary mission and sent an early warning signal, but the report from the submarine failed to reach the British forces at Bluff Cove. Another four Mirages carried out a decoy mission over the north of the islands, while the Argentine destroyer ARA Santísima Trinidad broadcast interference to jam the frequencies used by the Royal Navy's air controllers directing the Sea Harrier operations. At approximately 14:00 local time the ships RFA Sir Tristram and RFA Sir Galahad were badly damaged by five A-4Bs of Grupo 5.

Three A-4s targeted Sir Galahad, which was hit by three bombs from First Lieutenant Carlos Cachón. The second Skyhawk was unable to drop its bombs, and the third overshot the British ship. The remaining two aircraft attacked Sir Tristram, which was struck by two bombs released by package leader Lieutenant Daniel Gálvez; the bombs of the last A-4 fell short. The explosions and subsequent fires killed 48 men aboard Sir Galahad and two crew members from Sir Tristram. At 16:50 a second wave, composed by four A-4Bs of Grupo 5 hit and sank a Landing Craft Utility from HMS Fearless, ferrying the vehicles of the 5th Brigade's headquarters from Darwin to Bluff Cove in Choiseul Sound with the loss of 4 Royal Marines and 2 Royal Navy.

However, the Sea Harrier combat air patrol was already on scene and responded; three Skyhawks were shot down and their pilots, First Lieutenant Danilo Bolzan, Lieutenant Juan Arrarás, and Ensign Alfredo Vazquez, were killed. Bolzan's aircraft was shot down by Lieutenant David Smith, while the remaining Skyhawks fell victims to Flight Lieutenant David Morgan. The fourth aircraft suffered combat damage and lost a large amount of fuel, but returned to the mainland, assisted by a KC-130 tanker. A third wave, by A-4Cs of Grupo 4, arrived minutes later and struck ground targets without visible success. In a separate incident, the frigate HMS Plymouth endured the sudden attack of the six Daggers from Rio Grande, which struck her with four 1,000-pound bombs. The warship sustained severe damage, and five crewmen were injured. Although all the bombs were duds, the attack caused the explosion of at least one depth charge on her flight deck


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
A few years ago (post Falklands nastiness) there was an article written by an Argentinian aviation journalist (former air force) who was being given a flight in a Harrier. His pilot was David Morgan and the journalist admitted to being somewhat apprehensive about how he would be received but found that Morgan was a delightful character who could not have been more welcoming with no hint of any animosity.
 
B478DCAD-5A07-409C-BE68-C8CFDB2D2618.jpeg
 


cut and pasted from Faceach but nice to see crabair can look as ally as any.


Flight Lieutenant David Morgan

Flight Lieutenant David Morgan, He was credited with sinking one enemy vessel as well as shooting down two helicopters and two A-4 Skyhawks While unloading on 8 June, the British ships were attacked by two waves of A-4 Skyhawks from the Argentine Air Force's 5th Air Brigade, each of them loaded with three 500 lb retarding tail bombs of Spanish design. The fighters departed from Rio Gallegos airbase, which at the time was monitored by the nuclear submarine HMS Splendid.

The first package, originally made of eight aircraft, was reduced to five when three Skyhawks returned to base due to refuelling problems. The nuclear submarine HMS Valiant, on picket duty off Rio Grande, was able to track six Dagger fighters taking off from the airbase there for a complementary mission and sent an early warning signal, but the report from the submarine failed to reach the British forces at Bluff Cove. Another four Mirages carried out a decoy mission over the north of the islands, while the Argentine destroyer ARA Santísima Trinidad broadcast interference to jam the frequencies used by the Royal Navy's air controllers directing the Sea Harrier operations. At approximately 14:00 local time the ships RFA Sir Tristram and RFA Sir Galahad were badly damaged by five A-4Bs of Grupo 5.

Three A-4s targeted Sir Galahad, which was hit by three bombs from First Lieutenant Carlos Cachón. The second Skyhawk was unable to drop its bombs, and the third overshot the British ship. The remaining two aircraft attacked Sir Tristram, which was struck by two bombs released by package leader Lieutenant Daniel Gálvez; the bombs of the last A-4 fell short. The explosions and subsequent fires killed 48 men aboard Sir Galahad and two crew members from Sir Tristram. At 16:50 a second wave, composed by four A-4Bs of Grupo 5 hit and sank a Landing Craft Utility from HMS Fearless, ferrying the vehicles of the 5th Brigade's headquarters from Darwin to Bluff Cove in Choiseul Sound with the loss of 4 Royal Marines and 2 Royal Navy.

However, the Sea Harrier combat air patrol was already on scene and responded; three Skyhawks were shot down and their pilots, First Lieutenant Danilo Bolzan, Lieutenant Juan Arrarás, and Ensign Alfredo Vazquez, were killed. Bolzan's aircraft was shot down by Lieutenant David Smith, while the remaining Skyhawks fell victims to Flight Lieutenant David Morgan. The fourth aircraft suffered combat damage and lost a large amount of fuel, but returned to the mainland, assisted by a KC-130 tanker. A third wave, by A-4Cs of Grupo 4, arrived minutes later and struck ground targets without visible success. In a separate incident, the frigate HMS Plymouth endured the sudden attack of the six Daggers from Rio Grande, which struck her with four 1,000-pound bombs. The warship sustained severe damage, and five crewmen were injured. Although all the bombs were duds, the attack caused the explosion of at least one depth charge on her flight deck


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Highest scoring pilot in CORPORATE being an exchange RAF bloke? The FAA loooove hearing about that (I know from personal experience!!)
 
I think there is a special place in Ally world for Air Gunners (I would say this because one of my Mum's uncles was one).

1591557915119.png


1591557975843.png


1591558006947.png


1591558065535.png

1591558707596.png



1591558839678.png

One Legged Rear Gunner
Roberts Christian Dunstan
DSO (5 November 1922 – 11th October 1989) was an Australian Soldier & Airman of WW2. He was noted on his return to Australia after the War as a one-legged Air Gunner who had served with RAF Bomber Command. Dunstan was born in Bendigo, Victoria on 5th November 1922. He joined the Australian Imperial Force aged 17 on 3rd June 1940. After Training, he was sent to the 2/8th Field Company, a Field Engineer Unit, in North Africa as a reinforcement. In January 1941, near Tobruk, he was wounded in the knee and had his leg amputated. After resting in Egypt he was returned to Australia and medically discharged. Not happy with his short service, Dunstan attempted to join the Royal Australian Air Force as an Air Gunner. In 1942 he trained at Port Pirie and, promoted to Sergeant at the end of his Course, he embarked for Europe. Dunstan was assigned to No. 460 Squadron RAAF at RAF Binbrook, Lincolnshire, England as a Lancaster Rear Gunner. He flew his 1st Operation on 11th June 1943 to Düsseldorf. In October he was commissioned as a Pilot Officer and later was awarded the DSO for his efforts as a “Cool and skilful Air Gunner despite the handicap of one leg”. During one raid on Kassel on 22/23rd October 1943, the Plane in which he was flying was hit by 2 incendiary Bombs dropped by another Lancaster, which was off-course. The damage caused by this accident cut off the Oxygen Supply to Dunstan and the Mid-upper Gunner, Flight Sergeant Hegarty. As a result of the Oxygen starvation that both men suffered, neither saw the approach of an Enemy Night-Fighter, whose attack had badly damaged the Lancaster, one cannon shell passing through the Rear-gunner’s Turret. The Aircraft managed to return home and make a crash-landing at Bisham, the Crew escaping unhurt. Dunstan soon completed a full Tour of 30 operations and returned to Australia in August 1944. He was discharged from the RAAF on 2nd October 1945.
 
Last edited:

syrup

LE


cut and pasted from Faceach but nice to see crabair can look as ally as any.


Flight Lieutenant David Morgan

Flight Lieutenant David Morgan, He was credited with sinking one enemy vessel as well as shooting down two helicopters and two A-4 Skyhawks While unloading on 8 June, the British ships were attacked by two waves of A-4 Skyhawks from the Argentine Air Force's 5th Air Brigade, each of them loaded with three 500 lb retarding tail bombs of Spanish design. The fighters departed from Rio Gallegos airbase, which at the time was monitored by the nuclear submarine HMS Splendid.

The first package, originally made of eight aircraft, was reduced to five when three Skyhawks returned to base due to refuelling problems. The nuclear submarine HMS Valiant, on picket duty off Rio Grande, was able to track six Dagger fighters taking off from the airbase there for a complementary mission and sent an early warning signal, but the report from the submarine failed to reach the British forces at Bluff Cove. Another four Mirages carried out a decoy mission over the north of the islands, while the Argentine destroyer ARA Santísima Trinidad broadcast interference to jam the frequencies used by the Royal Navy's air controllers directing the Sea Harrier operations. At approximately 14:00 local time the ships RFA Sir Tristram and RFA Sir Galahad were badly damaged by five A-4Bs of Grupo 5.

Three A-4s targeted Sir Galahad, which was hit by three bombs from First Lieutenant Carlos Cachón. The second Skyhawk was unable to drop its bombs, and the third overshot the British ship. The remaining two aircraft attacked Sir Tristram, which was struck by two bombs released by package leader Lieutenant Daniel Gálvez; the bombs of the last A-4 fell short. The explosions and subsequent fires killed 48 men aboard Sir Galahad and two crew members from Sir Tristram. At 16:50 a second wave, composed by four A-4Bs of Grupo 5 hit and sank a Landing Craft Utility from HMS Fearless, ferrying the vehicles of the 5th Brigade's headquarters from Darwin to Bluff Cove in Choiseul Sound with the loss of 4 Royal Marines and 2 Royal Navy.

However, the Sea Harrier combat air patrol was already on scene and responded; three Skyhawks were shot down and their pilots, First Lieutenant Danilo Bolzan, Lieutenant Juan Arrarás, and Ensign Alfredo Vazquez, were killed. Bolzan's aircraft was shot down by Lieutenant David Smith, while the remaining Skyhawks fell victims to Flight Lieutenant David Morgan. The fourth aircraft suffered combat damage and lost a large amount of fuel, but returned to the mainland, assisted by a KC-130 tanker. A third wave, by A-4Cs of Grupo 4, arrived minutes later and struck ground targets without visible success. In a separate incident, the frigate HMS Plymouth endured the sudden attack of the six Daggers from Rio Grande, which struck her with four 1,000-pound bombs. The warship sustained severe damage, and five crewmen were injured. Although all the bombs were duds, the attack caused the explosion of at least one depth charge on her flight deck


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

When they ran in at low level to attack the airfield at Stanley he described soldiers firing down at him with their rifles from a hill.
On his return to the Islands he noticed a telephone wire strung between two poles that was estimated at 20 feet.
He pointed out he didn't remember it when he flew in last time.
One of the guys who was in the tower pointed out him and his wingman flew under it.
Reports from both Argentinians and Islanders stated the Harriers crossed the open ground at about 5 feet above the ground going like the clappers
 
Last edited:
I don't know, but he can't be ally, cause it looks as though he's wearing that abomination of combats from 1985 (?) with the single stiching and flared/pointy pockets. If you're going to wear ally kit in civvies, get a smock - Arctic or SAS
@Himmler74 - you obviously don't do sarcasm, but thanks for the dumb anyway
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
When they ran in at low level to attack the sirfirels at Stanley he described soldiers firing down at him with their rifles from a hill.
On his return to the Islands he noticed a telephone wire strung between two piles that was estimated at 20 feet.
He pointed out he didn't remember it when he flew in last time.
One of the guys who was in the tower pointed out him and his wingman flew under it.
Reports from both Argentinians and Islanders stated the Harriers crossed the open ground at about 5 feet above the ground going like the clapped.
And for all the times we rib the RAF on here, one word: nails.
 
Top