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Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Nails isn't the word for her. Survived Ravensbruck? Survived a death march? Survived Dachau? Over six combat jumps? ******* hell.

Kate Adie isn't fit to lick the jungle dirt from the cleats of her jump boots. Yet guess who has the bigger Wikipedia page?
The fragrant Katie has presently a better opportunity to edit her page to fame and fortune than does Miss Friang.
 

Whining Civvy

War Hero
Another one from Faceach. Check the slippers on the MO and pilot far right (still nails)

Officers of No. 1 Squadron RAF standing outside their mess, the Mairie at Neuville-sur-Ornain - April 1940
(left to right), Flying Officers Billie Drake and Leslie R Clisby (KIA 14/5/40), Pilot Officer Robert Lorimer (KIA 14/5/40), Flight Lieutenant Peter P Hanks, Flying Officer Peter W O "Boy" Mould, Squadron Leader Patrick J H "Bull" Halahan (Commanding Officer), Lieutenant Jean "Moses" Demozay (French Air Force interpreter), Flight Lieutenant Peter R "Johnny"Walker, Flight Lieutenant D M "Doc" Brown (Medical Officer), Flying Officers Paul H M Richey and John I "Killy" Kilmartin, Pilot Officer William H Stratton and Flying Officer C D "Pussy" Palmer (KIA 27/10/42).

(Photo source - IWM C 1293)
Devon, Stanley (Flight Lieutenant)
Royal Air Force official photographer

(Colour by Doug)


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Call him what you like but I'm pretty sure that's Lord Flasheart fourth from left.
 
Nails isn't the word for her. Survived Ravensbruck? Survived a death march? Survived Dachau? Over six combat jumps? ******* hell.

Kate Adie isn't fit to lick the jungle dirt from the cleats of her jump boots. Yet guess who has the bigger Wikipedia page?
Bet Ms Friang stuck to the facts too.

I suppose not actually being there does lead the present generation of self absorbed and self promoting hacks to make up shit, due to lack of actual facts.
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
All my shorts are like that, not quite knacker crackers, but almost. Can't abide knee flapping shorts.
Empire builders are the way forward. I don’t think it’s any coincidence that the demise of decent shorts coincided either the demise of the Empire.
 
Brigette Friang, a female French journalist , am surprised she hasn't made an appearance here.

Article here The Female War Reporter Who Parachuted Into Vietnam With French Commandos

View attachment 462420

How to re-write history....about the US involvement in the war in Indochina:

"The world’s superpowers took sides; the U.S. sided with France and sent American advisors to what was later called “the war before the war,”

Yes, the US did send equipment and some advisors, but only 6 years after the beginning of the war and after having done everything it could to stop France from regaining its pre-war grip on the area.

In 1945, American OSS Team Deer advised, protected, gave medical treatment and saved Ho Chi Minh (both from a tropical disease and French troops) and provided the first Vietminh elements with about 200 weapons including MGs and mortars. The rest is history.

 
In 1945 there was a firm belief across much of the upper echelons of US Government that the Soviet Union was a progressive power that business could be done with and that eventually the world would settle into a free and peaceful co-dominium divided into spheres overseen by the two new superpowers. The old colonial powers of Britain, France, etc. were viewed as oppressive, reactionary and passé and they had to be dismantled.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
In 1945 there was a firm belief across much of the upper echelons of US Government that the Soviet Union was a progressive power that business could be done with and that eventually the world would settle into a free and peaceful co-dominium divided into spheres overseen by the two new superpowers. The old colonial powers of Britain, France, etc. were viewed as oppressive, reactionary and passé and they had to be dismantled.
I'm glad that worked out so well.
 
Nails isn't the word for her. Survived Ravensbruck? Survived a death march? Survived Dachau? Over six combat jumps? ******* hell.

Kate Adie isn't fit to lick the jungle dirt from the cleats of her jump boots. Yet guess who has the bigger Wikipedia page?


Better looking than Kate Adie as well...
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer


Better looking than Kate Adie as well...
Don't get your hopes up:
#001 - she's dead.
#002 - if she wasn't dead she'd be ninety-six.
#003 - if the first two serials didn't cover it, she ate at the Y.
 
Don't get your hopes up:
#001 - she's dead. - what's your point?
#002 - if she wasn't dead she'd be ninety-six. - see #001
#003 - if the first two serials didn't cover it, she ate at the Y. - Not a problem if you employ 'subcontinental romance.'
 

Niamac

GCM
The Angel of Dien Bien Phu

1585996525473.png


As a Flight Nurse she got stuck there by accident but rose to the occasion and was in charge of a 40 bed "ward" for seriously injured soldiers. After capture the VM allowed her to continue her work until evacuated back to Hanoi.
 
The Angel of Dien Bien Phu

View attachment 462524

As a Flight Nurse she got stuck there by accident but rose to the occasion and was in charge of a 40 bed "ward" for seriously injured soldiers. After capture the VM allowed her to continue her work until evacuated back to Hanoi.
Geneviève de Galard is the best known because of the exposure she received during and mostly after DBP; she even had her own ticker tape parade in New York.

Nevertheless there were many other nurses, including some who were para trained. One of the most famous, who was KIA in Algeria in 1957, had over 500 para jumps. Her name was Jacqueline Domergue

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French Army nurses arriving in Hanoï in 1947.

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During the parade

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Decorated by Pdt Eisenhower

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After the ceremony

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It was a subtle way for the US authorities to start raising the awareness of South East Asia issues in the US population through the fate of the "Angel of DBP" as she was then called. Soon US advisers would arrive in SVN in ever greater numbers and 11 years later the Marines landed in Da Nang, a placed which used to be called Tourane by the French during the previous decades....
 
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This is the conditions they were working in when in DBP

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Entrance to the aid post

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Inside the aid post

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Past help, between stacks of parachutes and bamboo poles

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WIAs hoping to be evacuated by air; by the end of March 1954, Vietminh artillery interdicted the airstrip. That meant that all WIAs had to remain in DBP until the end of the battle on 7 May 1954. Many walking wounded returned to the fight.

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Médecin Commandant Grauwin, the best known DBP surgeon, who operated and saved 100s of WIAs in DBP

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Inside the RAP
 
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QRK2

LE
This is the conditions they were working in when in DBP

View attachment 462557

Entrance to the aid post

View attachment 462559

Inside the aid post

View attachment 462560

View attachment 462561

View attachment 462563

Past help, between stacks of parachutes and bamboo poles

View attachment 462564

WIAs hoping to be evacuated by air; by the end of March 1954, Vietminh artillery interdicted the airstrip. That meant that all WIAs had to remain in DBP until the end of the battle on 7 May 1954. Many walking wounded returned to the fight.
I was lucky enough to go on a LONDIST battlefield study trip there. As the valley is so remote and of course of historical importance to the Vietnamese there are a considerable amount of trenches etc that are still recognisable and as one goes through the village it is noticeable how much airfield PSP has been reused in construction as fencing etc.
 
Call him what you like but I'm pretty sure that's Lord Flasheart fourth from left.
Call him what you like but I'm pretty sure that's Lord Flasheart fourth from left.
This is the conditions they were working in when in DBP

View attachment 462557

Entrance to the aid post

View attachment 462559

Inside the aid post

View attachment 462560

View attachment 462561

View attachment 462563

Past help, between stacks of parachutes and bamboo poles

View attachment 462564

WIAs hoping to be evacuated by air; by the end of March 1954, Vietminh artillery interdicted the airstrip. That meant that all WIAs had to remain in DBP until the end of the battle on 7 May 1954. Many walking wounded returned to the fight.

View attachment 462637

Médecin Commandant Grauwin, the best known DBP surgeon, who operated and saved 100s of WIAs in DBP

View attachment 462638
Inside the RAP
What happened to the wounded after the surrender. Did the Viet Minh abide by the Geneva Convention, or did they go by Imperial Japanese Army SOPs?
 
What happened to the wounded after the surrender. Did the Viet Minh abide by the Geneva Convention, or did they go by Imperial Japanese Army SOPs?
Some of the most grievously wounded were evacuated during a ceasefire just after the end of the battle. Between 15 and 26 May 1954, 858 very serious cases were evacuated from DBP tu Luang Prabang, via FW and a few RW.

It is estimated that 10,998 members of the French forces were captured on 7 May 1954. In his book on DBP, Martin Windrow quotes the number of about 10,000 POWs including 4,500 wounded.

After the evacuation of the most serious case, the roughly 9,000 remaining POWs were first made to walk up to 700 km to their POW camps, often with no shoes, fed on a rice ball a day and having only unboiled water to drink which led to amoebic dysentery. The trek lasted between one and two months, depending on the destination.

Then, on arrival in the various POW camps, they were subjected to a very harsh regime of Communist indoctrination made worst by starvation, total lack of medical care and extremely primitive living conditions under a tropical climate. The POWs died in their thousands, both on the way to the camps and then in the camps.

Officers and NCOs were separated from the ORs, the European were separated from the Colonial troops and medical doctors were forced to remain with officers and not to treat the wounded. Everybody was subjected to political re-education.

The Colonial troops (except the Vietnamese incorporated in the French armed forces who were often shot on the spot when captured) were given both better treatment and a specific political indoctrination so as to serve as revolutionary ferments on their return to their homelands. Some fell for it, others remained loyal.

A total of 78 escapees managed to leave DBP after its fall and reach French positions that were between 100-125 miles away; of those, only 19 were Europeans, the others being locally recruited Thaïs would could easily pass a part of the population. Nobody will ever know how many tried and were killed or just died of exhaustion.

1586032471349.png


On the right, Sgt Delobel, 35 RAP (ABN Artillery) who managed to escape with 2 other French soldiers. He weighed 36 kg when he was recovered.

In September 1954, only 3,900 POWs were liberated from Vietminh camps.

This is how they looked like

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Altogether, throughout the war, the survival rate of POWs in Vietminh camp was 29%.
 

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