Search for an *Ally* star

ugly

LE
Moderator
Notice the ribbon of a decidedly ally MM on his battledress?

Definitely one of the early No1 MkV1 conversions, I wonder if it has the A prefix and suffix, oh how to tease rivet counters!
I had a waisted fore sight protector, it was incorrectly fitted to a south African issued Savage No4 Mk1*, I swapped it out for a normal pattern and bugger me if I cant find it, it was bent out of shape too!
 
Definitely one of the early No1 MkV1 conversions, I wonder if it has the A prefix and suffix, oh how to tease rivet counters!
I had a waisted fore sight protector, it was incorrectly fitted to a south African issued Savage No4 Mk1*, I swapped it out for a normal pattern and bugger me if I cant find it, it was bent out of shape too!
The image is titled 'LCpl Poulter, Italy 1943' throughout the web: Poulter is, allegedly, a Canadian soldier. This seems to be borne out by his BD which (OK, the image has been colourised later) is of distinctive Canadian pattern and design.

Canadian BD differed quite a bit from so-called UK P40 BD: the cut was more tailored, the dyes used gave it a greener tint over the true khaki of P40 and the button closures at the front, breast pockets and cuffs were hidden.

Having said all that, Poulter wears absolutely no badges of rank and no Arm of Service or unit designators, other than the ribbon of a MM. Either he has just received a new issue purely for PR purposes-or he is British, as many units received Canadian BD issues if Brit stocks were low.

Canada produced no No1 MkVIs: so, how did our supposed Canadian sniper end up with one of these?

 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Canada produced no No1 MkVIs: so, how did our supposed Canadian sniper end up with one of these?
Issued as part of forces in UK, I dont think the CEF brought snipers with them in 1939.
 
The image is titled 'LCpl Poulter, Italy 1943' throughout the web: Poulter is, allegedly, a Canadian soldier. This seems to be borne out by his BD which (OK, the image has been colourised later) is of distinctive Canadian pattern and design.

Canadian BD differed quite a bit from so-called UK P40 BD: the cut was more tailored, the dyes used gave it a greener tint over the true khaki of P40 and the button closures at the front, breast pockets and cuffs were hidden.

Having said all that, Poulter wears absolutely no badges of rank and no Arm of Service or unit designators, other than the ribbon of a MM. Either he has just received a new issue purely for PR purposes-or he is British, as many units received Canadian BD issues if Brit stocks were low.

Canada produced no No1 MkVIs: so, how did our supposed Canadian sniper end up with one of these?


The IWM states he was 56th Infantry Division.

THE BRITISH ARMY IN ITALY 1943

1529691454255.png
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
He is also wearing a Khaki shirt instead of an undershirt and it has a collar, no expense spared!
 
Yep, I know that: and, given the date of the image (1943), he should be 1st Bn London Scottish.

Trouble is, he is most certainly dressed in Canadian BD: however, such BD was issued to UK troops (and very much prized, by all accounts).
1st and 5th Canadian Divisions were in Italy at the time of the photograph, so it seems not un-likely.
 
Thing is, for a medal researching anorak, my London Gazette Fu is crap (their search function is absolutely horrible) and I can't pin down 'Poulter' and 'Military Medal' for that period.

Research, as they say, continues.
 
The image is titled 'LCpl Poulter, Italy 1943' throughout the web: Poulter is, allegedly, a Canadian soldier. This seems to be borne out by his BD which (OK, the image has been colourised later) is of distinctive Canadian pattern and design.

Canadian BD differed quite a bit from so-called UK P40 BD: the cut was more tailored, the dyes used gave it a greener tint over the true khaki of P40 and the button closures at the front, breast pockets and cuffs were hidden.

Having said all that, Poulter wears absolutely no badges of rank and no Arm of Service or unit designators, other than the ribbon of a MM. Either he has just received a new issue purely for PR purposes-or he is British, as many units received Canadian BD issues if Brit stocks were low.

Canada produced no No1 MkVIs: so, how did our supposed Canadian sniper end up with one of these?

I am often astonished by detailed knowledge produced by this forum. How and why do you know all that? My knowledge of WW2 Canadian battle dress cut and colour is zero.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
How and why do you know all that?
Because we like to pretend that trainspotting is for children!
The human brain can retain mounds of information, I can still recall the weight overall and explosive of the L2 grenade, I probably could set and arm a prac off route mine but I am fucked if I can recall what I worked on last night. When I work I have to just shut my eyes and go into auto pilot!
 
The human brain can retain mounds of information, I can still recall the weight overall and explosive of the L2 grenade, I probably could set and arm a prac off route mine but I am fucked if I can recall what I worked on last night. When I work I have to just shut my eyes and go into auto pilot![/QUOTE]

Fair point. Mrs. A has pointed out that I seem to know far too much about the Eastern front post Stalingrad but would lose my own testicles if I didn't keep them in a bag.

She's dead posh she is.
 
I am often astonished by detailed knowledge produced by this forum. How and why do you know all that? My knowledge of WW2 Canadian battle dress cut and colour is zero.
How? S'easy-it's because I can.

Why? Ah, that's a touch more difficult to explain: as m'learned friend @ugly pointed out, it's 'easy', after all these years, for me to recall stoppage drills on LMG, SMG, SLR, Pistol 9mm, L42, 76mm and 81mm Mortar-if you really want, I could do you a decent triple period on 'GPMG-Further Mechanism'.

Damned if I can find my spare car keys, though.

But, like you, I have always been intrigued by all aspects of military history, particularly the minutiae of the various combatants: dress, equipment, insignia, etc.

. . . which is why, sadly, I will go to my death knowing that, during WWII, there were over 160 firms in Nazi Germany that made the Iron Cross medal.

My spare car keys, however, will remain unfound.
 
[QU there were over 160 firms in Nazi Germany that made the Iron Cross medal.

160? Why? That's intriguing. Knowing nothing about medal casting (although it's probably a simple enough process) that seems excessive.

Much of Nazi Germany makes little sense to me. For example, I find it astonishing that trains were requisitioned to ship jews west so that they could be dealt with later, rather than used to ship men and munitions east.
 
[QU there were over 160 firms in Nazi Germany that made the Iron Cross medal.

160? Why? That's intriguing. Knowing nothing about medal casting (although it's probably a simple enough process) that seems excessive.

Much of Nazi Germany makes little sense to me. For example, I find it astonishing that trains were requisitioned to ship jews west so that they could be dealt with later, rather than used to ship men and munitions east.
Without wishing to Fred Rift this too far . . . there's a series of images in the (I think) Bavarian Photo Archive which survived the war. It is a step-by-step account of how an Iron Cross was manufactured: other than the initial stamping of the iron centre and the outer border (the medal is actually formed from 3 separate pieces)from a registered die, all the other stages involved tradesmen-hellishly labour intensive! This is probably one of the reasons why they command such a premium now, the market is prone to good quality copies and why German grave sites in Russia, Poland, Ukraine etc are scavenged for such artefacts.

I used a similar example in my dissertation (the Nazi-era Bahnschutzpolizei) to show how Nazi bureaucracy all but guaranteed their defeat: during the course of it's existence, this organisation went through something like 5 uniform changes, 7 cap changes, half a dozen rank structures and about 17 different pay grades-and all for a police force that investigated crime on the state railway system!

I'll shut up now.
 
I am often astonished by detailed knowledge produced by this forum. How and why do you know all that? My knowledge of WW2 Canadian battle dress cut and colour is zero.
A lacy off the shoulder number and size eleven slingbacks more your style ?
 
Found him.

He is LCpl Arthur Percival PROCTER MM, 1st Bn London Scottish (Gordon Highlanders). His MM was Gazetted in a Supplement dated 19 Oct 43 which ties in with the image date of 24 Nov 43.

The London Gazette
Publication date:19 October 1943 Supplement:36217Page:4663

No. 2940292 Private Arthur Percival Procter, The Gordon Highlanders (London, N.W.1).

The 'London NW1' refers to his home address.

A check with Commonwealth War Graves site shows no hit on his details so he survived the war.
 

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