"Sea Hunter" Drone Ship Sails Autonomously to Hawaii and Back to San Diego

#63
When I worked for P&O Bulk they had an LNG ship like the (SS LNG Challenger/Pollenger). Whenever she berthed in Boston they shut the airport down to avoid any accidents - LNG is lighter than air and is flammable as a vapour and they didn't want any aircraft overhead while the ship was discharging cargo.
Nah, it was in case you had a really warm spell and the ship floated up and hit the aircraft. :-D
 
#64
I know that anecdotes aren't facts but let me describe a situation that I was in a while ago.

We'd been to Port Chalmers (New Zealand) in a 5,000grt RoRo to drop a couple of containers off.

We left and came south about South Island straight into a 48 hour force 12 hurricane in ~48 south aka the roaring forties.

The only thing that kept us afloat was the years of experience of our Old Man and the skill of our Filipino bosun and ABs at the wheel.

Without them we'd all be dead.

How well do you think an autonomous ship would have handled that situation? I suggest that the ship would have disappeared without trace.
 
#66
Commercial use AI is the tipping point for civilisation.
 
#67
The Pacific is all very well as it's mostly empty but autonomously navigating the Dover Strait or the Solent might be a bit more challenging. The former has everything down to rather over-populated rubber boats.
Yes indeed,
I recall being on the Golden Gate Bridge and watching the wake of ships straight as an arrow until it disappeared over the horizon.
Of course, for all I knew, there might have been the odd island to divert around en-route but it was easy to imagine setting a course dead straight to Pusan or Yokohama or wherever, thousands of miles away.
 
#68
Well, just don't tell the government or they'll think that they've found the solution to the RN's crew shortages!
 
#69
I know that anecdotes aren't facts but let me describe a situation that I was in a while ago.

We'd been to Port Chalmers (New Zealand) in a 5,000grt RoRo to drop a couple of containers off.

We left and came south about South Island straight into a 48 hour force 12 hurricane in ~48 south aka the roaring forties.

The only thing that kept us afloat was the years of experience of our Old Man and the skill of our Filipino bosun and ABs at the wheel.

Without them we'd all be dead.

How well do you think an autonomous ship would have handled that situation? I suggest that the ship would have disappeared without trace.
What does that look like, how does the human handle it and what would cause the ship to disappear?

Those maritime storms I only every see on Discovery blow me away but you never get an explanation, it always looks like the ship just handles it which I know isnt true.
 
#70
Commercial use AI is the tipping point for civilisation.
Its certainly encroaching, we are just putting our D10 Dozers under AI - still need a person in the loop but we dont need 5 drivers. Its safe, no more black lung or drivers in holes but its less jobs.

I think that the government should tax automation more than wages, if they want to automate my job then fine, but pretty soon there will be so few jobs we will all be fooked. Of course its cheaper for a robot, but it doesnt get taxed cos it doesnt get wages.

Inter desting.
 
#71
I know that anecdotes aren't facts but let me describe a situation that I was in a while ago.

We'd been to Port Chalmers (New Zealand) in a 5,000grt RoRo to drop a couple of containers off.

We left and came south about South Island straight into a 48 hour force 12 hurricane in ~48 south aka the roaring forties.

The only thing that kept us afloat was the years of experience of our Old Man and the skill of our Filipino bosun and ABs at the wheel.

Without them we'd all be dead.

How well do you think an autonomous ship would have handled that situation? I suggest that the ship would have disappeared without trace.
Short and obvious answer is no one knows until we try it. If ships start disappearing in bad weather I'm sure people will end up back on board, if they don't then the experience of your humans obviously wasn't as vital as you wish to believe.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#72
Short and obvious answer is no one knows until we try it. If ships start disappearing in bad weather I'm sure people will end up back on board, if they don't then the experience of your humans obviously wasn't as vital as you wish to believe.
Crewed ships have been disappearing in bad weather since man first started bobbing about on the ocean waves.
 
#73
What does that look like, how does the human handle it and what would cause the ship to disappear?

Those maritime storms I only every see on Discovery blow me away but you never get an explanation, it always looks like the ship just handles it which I know isnt true.

It's the man on the wheel that handles it. Basically you just steer the ship bow first into the waves. If you allow the ship to broach (turn side on to the waves) you're fucked.

It was pretty scary but was the most exciting thing that I've ever experienced too.

Here's a model broaching

 

A2_Matelot

LE
Book Reviewer
#74
I know that anecdotes aren't facts but let me describe a situation that I was in a while ago.

We'd been to Port Chalmers (New Zealand) in a 5,000grt RoRo to drop a couple of containers off.

We left and came south about South Island straight into a 48 hour force 12 hurricane in ~48 south aka the roaring forties.

The only thing that kept us afloat was the years of experience of our Old Man and the skill of our Filipino bosun and ABs at the wheel.

Without them we'd all be dead.

How well do you think an autonomous ship would have handled that situation? I suggest that the ship would have disappeared without trace.
You train AI/ML by experience, that in part is why google/uber and others are driving cars across the US and are actually not that upset when they have accidents, it's valuable experience. Just as we can't react to every situation we can't expect an AI, but if you train it sufficiently then it will react appropriately. Just like a human.

I'm not saying this will happen overnight but I think we will see incremental capability delivery and as we now have far easier access to swathes of pertinent data (MET, OC, GEO, AIS etc.) we can form decisions far more easily than ever before.

In many ways an autonomous ship isn't hugely different to an autonomous car; a set of rules with prescribed reactions/actions and a requirement to watch the other entities to assess their actions and if they deviate from expected norms a further set of appropriate and safe actions. It's not rocket science.
 
#75
It's the man on the wheel that handles it. Basically you just steer the ship bow first into the waves. If you allow the ship to broach (turn side on to the waves) you're fucked.

It was pretty scary but was the most exciting thing that I've ever experienced too.

Here's a model broaching

Are those gen waves in scale or just a test to destruction?
 
#77
You train AI/ML by experience, that in part is why google/uber and others are driving cars across the US and are actually not that upset when they have accidents, it's valuable experience. Just as we can't react to every situation we can't expect an AI, but if you train it sufficiently then it will react appropriately. Just like a human.

I'm not saying this will happen overnight but I think we will see incremental capability delivery and as we now have far easier access to swathes of pertinent data (MET, OC, GEO, AIS etc.) we can form decisions far more easily than ever before.

In many ways an autonomous ship isn't hugely different to an autonomous car; a set of rules with prescribed reactions/actions and a requirement to watch the other entities to assess their actions and if they deviate from expected norms a further set of appropriate and safe actions. It's not rocket science.

One major difference between cars anf ships is that cars move on a stable platform whereas the sea is anything but.
 
#78
It's the man on the wheel that handles it. Basically you just steer the ship bow first into the waves. If you allow the ship to broach (turn side on to the waves) you're fucked.

It was pretty scary but was the most exciting thing that I've ever experienced too.
I concur.

Ship I was on was approximately halfway between porridge land and Iceland. It was blowing a hooley and the sea state was about 9 - AKA Harry Roughers.

Around midnight I was on the bridge and looking out of the window I saw the goffer that hit us. It hit us mid-ships at an angle but the force turned the ship square on, the wave broached us and the ship healed over to about 45°. Water came in through the vent trunkings and ended up in the aft switchboard which went bang and started a fire. We had a TLF. Things got quite interesting for a few hours.
 
#79
Short and obvious answer is no one knows until we try it. If ships start disappearing in bad weather I'm sure people will end up back on board, if they don't then the experience of your humans obviously wasn't as vital as you wish to believe.

In theory. I can't see someone like Maersk risking a $150 million ship with several million dollars worth of cargo on it though.
 
#80
Nobody seems to be reading the article and seem to be rather missing the point.

SEA HUNTER is not designed to replace gigantic freighters, it’s about carrying out the kind of missions listed without risking humans and enabling the use of multiple platforms due to cost reduction.

It’s not about about navigating 20,000 tons of sweating TNT through a Force 12 with a virtual Jack Hawkins at the helm. If it goes down in rough seas then it’s a relatively minor loss, certainly less than a valuable warship and with zero loss of life.

Verstehen sie?
 

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