"Sea Hunter" Drone Ship Sails Autonomously to Hawaii and Back to San Diego

#41
I'm sure an automatic ship can be programmed to run a known path just outside the river/harbour mouth until it's picked up a pilot.

If ships become autonomous where are the pilots going to be trained? Most pilots were deckies in the merch before they became pilots.
 
#42
When about 40 years ago the International Association of Lighthouse Authorities decided to standardise bouyage, lights, etc worldwide, the USA wanted to drive on the opposite side from everybody else*.

Thus it came about that are are two IALA systems, A and B.

In very brief, there are cardinal mark bouys in various patterns of yellow and black indicating North, South, East and West. And there are channel market bouys in red and green (remember, port is red). Question is, when you're in a channel into or out of a harbour, which way you're going dictates whether red is on the left and the right.

And so it came to pass that the world uses System A, except the USA (and by extension the rest of the Americas) uses System B (or it may be the other way round. It's decades since I cared).
_____
* Not strictly true. They still pass port side to port side, ie on the right, but their channel markings are the reverse of the other system.
Region ''B'' covers North, Central and South Americas, Japan, South Korea & the Philippines
 
#43
If ships become autonomous where are the pilots going to be trained? Most pilots were deckies in the merch before they became pilots.
Well the one I knew was an International Master Mariner, but it is a good point, it would be bloody lonely sailing the seven seas in something that effectively ran itself.
 
#44
Well the one I knew was an International Master Mariner, but it is a good point, it would be bloody lonely sailing the seven seas in something that effectively ran itself.

'Deckies' is the merch nickname for navigation officers - which includes those with Master's CoCs and all the other lesser spotted varieties.
 
#45
Yeah-about the rush to welcome autonomous shipping:

Let me introduce you to 'Arctic Princess'

1550767764439.jpeg


121000 gt, LOA 288m and a beam just shy of 50m. She's a Norwegian LNG carrier and, on Monday this week, she left the Dragon LNG terminal here at Milford Haven, about a mile and half from my house.

At the time, Man Cub and I had the boat out on the waterway doing an engine test: at 43ft LOA and 13ft beam, mine is one of the bigger craft in the Marina.

Because of her size (Limited Ability To Manoeuvre) and cargo nature, the Port Authority is obliged, by law, to provide tug assistance (in this case 3 of the bigger ones) and a smaller tug 1nm ahead acting as a safety vessel. And a Pilot.

Given all that, I am obliged to GTF out of her way, at all times.

Now, such a beast will NEVER be allowed to move as an autonomous vessel. Certainly not in my life time.

. . . but other, smaller autonomous craft that are unable/slow to respond to wind over tide or react to instruction from the safety vessel? Yep, I don't see a problem with that at all.

No siree, Bob.
 
#46
'Deckies' is the merch nickname for navigation officers - which includes those with Master's CoCs and all the other lesser spotted varieties.
OK, too much exposure to the fishing fleet [when it existed] where a deckie is the bloke who guts the catch and is occasionally allowed to do other similarly simple tasks.
 
#48
It's going to be a long way off before this even begins to be a viable option to crewed vessels. I can see 'assisted' automation but not complete auto. Ships are still going to need a crew to look after the day to day operations, I just read a whole wack of ship collision reports, auto could have helped in a few situations for sure but many are weather, current, and 'the other ship' related and no amount of software can account for all types of weather, sea states, or other non auto idiots.

Having said that I can see the Navy having smaller Drone ships that will accompany Carrier Fleets as escorts and the like. But commercial vessels not yet.
 
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#49
Yeah-about the rush to welcome autonomous shipping:

Let me introduce you to 'Arctic Princess'

View attachment 379016

121000 gt, LOA 288m and a beam just shy of 50m. She's a Norwegian LNG carrier and, on Monday this week, she left the Dragon LNG terminal here at Milford Haven, about a mile and half from my house.

At the time, Man Cub and I had the boat out on the waterway doing an engine test: at 43ft LOA and 13ft beam, mine is one of the bigger craft in the Marina.

Because of her size (Limited Ability To Manoeuvre) and cargo nature, the Port Authority is obliged, by law, to provide tug assistance (in this case 3 of the bigger ones) and a smaller tug 1nm ahead acting as a safety vessel. And a Pilot.

Given all that, I am obliged to GTF out of her way, at all times.

Now, such a beast will NEVER be allowed to move as an autonomous vessel. Certainly not in my life time.

. . . but other, smaller autonomous craft that are unable/slow to respond to wind over tide or react to instruction from the safety vessel? Yep, I don't see a problem with that at all.

No siree, Bob.

When I worked for P&O Bulk they had an LNG ship like the (SS LNG Challenger/Pollenger). Whenever she berthed in Boston they shut the airport down to avoid any accidents - LNG is lighter than air and is flammable as a vapour and they didn't want any aircraft overhead while the ship was discharging cargo.
 
#51
When I worked for P&O Bulk they had an LNG ship like the (SS LNG Challenger/Pollenger). Whenever she berthed in Boston they shut the airport down to avoid any accidents - LNG is lighter than air and is flammable as a vapour and they didn't want any aircraft overhead while the ship was discharging cargo.
Lucky old me: I have Dragon LNG one side, South Hook the other and the Valero oil site directly opposite. Both LNG sites are constructed into a natural bowl so that, in the event of something going 'pop', the subsequent blast effect will be directed upward.

. . . or, as one of the South Hook supervisors said to me, 'They'll find enough left for a decent funeral'.
 
#52
Looking at some of the coverage, significant factor is that bean counters have worked out that things like this have an overall operating cost of $15-20k per day whilst a fully crewed destroyer clocks in around $700k per day.

For a bit of general remote stooging about and sniffing, a good option.
 
#53
It's going to be a long way off before this even begins to be a viable option to crewed vessels. I can see 'assisted' automation but not complete auto. Ships are still going to need a crew to look after the day to day operations, I just read a whole wack of ship collision reports, auto could have helped in a few situations for sure but many are weather, current, and 'the other ship' related and no amount of software can account for all types of weather, sea states, or other non auto idiots.

Having said that I can see the Navy having smaller Drone ships that will accompany Carrier Fleets as escorts and the like. But commercial vessels not yet.
Did you read the original article?
 
#55
Now modern ships carry mighty funny gear.
And away get away you shantyman
Ain`t seen a halyard in many`s a year
And they got no use for the shantyman.

Slick new fittings are all your style.
And away get away you shantyman
All very clever but it just ain`t right.
And they got no use for the shantyman.

Shantyman oh shantyman, who`s got a berth for the shantyman?
I’ll sing you a song of a world gone wrong.
When they got no use for the shantyman.

Levers to jerk and buttons to press.
And real live sailors they need them less.
Pushing on buttons and hauling on levers.
And they got no use for the horny-handed heavers.

The cargo is stored in a polythene pack.
Raised and lowered by a dry bollocks jack.
Floating computer dressed like a ship.
Skippered and crewed by a microchip.

Listen at night and you might hear.
A ghostly voice on the quiet air.
Is it a voice from the distant past?
Or just a breeze in the radar mast?

Old time ways are forgotten and gone
For no-one listens to the shantyman’s song
Things no longer as they used to be
It’s the knacker’s yard for you and me.

(By Bob Watson)
 
#56
1. The sailboat ought to have a radar reflector to announce its presence.

2. Contrary to popular belief, steam doesn't give way to sail any more. Leisure gives way to commercial.
Might is right.

Just ask any cyclist that's plunged underneath the wheels of an articulated lorry.
 

Longlenny

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#57
My son is a Design Engineer in this field, he is currently designing vessels to survey the Southern Ocean, a few million square kilometres. Someone up thread was of the opinion that these things might not be used in crowded waters, there was one recently navigating the South Coast, it was steered via satelite from Brazil.
 
#59
My son is a Design Engineer in this field, he is currently designing vessels to survey the Southern Ocean, a few million square kilometres. Someone up thread was of the opinion that these things might not be used in crowded waters, there was one recently navigating the South Coast, it was steered via satelite from Brazil.

If it was being steered by a human, no matter where they were, it wasn't an autonomous ship.
 

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