Sea Fury T20 Crash at Duxford

Personally, piston-wise, I think the Centaurus is one of those engines that is of sufficient complexity to place it at the threshold of non-military operation. It's a complicated donk and the FAA had enough problems with servicability back in the day, never mind enthusiastic amateurs seventy years down the line.
 
30 years of polishing out the last set of dinks, just to see it crash once more?

There’s some bloke with a yellow duster feeling a bit frustrated as he reaches for the T-Cut again...
Surely it must be approaching having mostly new components?
'This aircraft is original, except for the airframe and fittings which have been replaced'
 

tiv

LE
I see the handiwork of the

I see the hand of the fire brigade and their jaws of life here. someone got cut out. Any broken legs among the two crew?
[/QUOTE
Personally, piston-wise, I think the Centaurus is one of those engines that is of sufficient complexity to place it at the threshold of non-military operation. It's a complicated donk and the FAA had enough problems with servicability back in the day, never mind enthusiastic amateurs seventy years down the line.
Quite true but if you read Sea Fury T.20 G-INVN “Invincible” – Norwegian Spitfire Foundation you will see that it had been re-engined with a Pratt & Whitney R2800.

See also Flight testing Hawker Sea Fury T.20 'WG655'
 
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Personally, piston-wise, I think the Centaurus is one of those engines that is of sufficient complexity to place it at the threshold of non-military operation. It's a complicated donk and the FAA had enough problems with servicability back in the day, never mind enthusiastic amateurs seventy years down the line.
Robby Coltrane did a series on engines many moons ago and noted air travel only became a safe and practical option with the advent of the jet engine.
we went from engines with many hundreds of moving parts, any of which if it failed could bring down a plane, to one.
 
I'm pretty sure that the day when the likes of the Lancaster stop flying won't be far away.
An interesting point. The East Kirkby crowd talk about getting their Lancaster in the air but I think they're being optimistic. I'm pleased the Vulcan was parked up before that ended in tears.
 
‘Trigger’s broom’ has never been more apt when referring to many of these aircraft.
 
‘Trigger’s broom’ has never been more apt when referring to many of these aircraft.
There was a chap in the US(edit and correction - it was a German company - Flug Werke), about 20 years ago, who made a small number of new Fw190s - one of the 'A' types. He used a Russian radial engine and i think the aircraft had modern communications and navigation kit. It struck me as a decent idea - for a type where there is sufficient demand: new very low hours airframes, no risk to an antique or solo surviving examples, etc.
I am not aware of the new build concept having been repeated in many cases, and you wpuld imagine that economic viability would depend upon any new build being a popular type, with a reliable equivalent engine being available.

Photo of a Flug Werke Fw190 -
flugwerk-built-focke-wulf-fw-190-a8n-in-luftwaffe-colours-taxiing-BWDJT7.jpg
 
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I'm surprised the 262 project didn't build a few more. I've still never seen one flying. A missed opportunity for Flying Legends, one of those tooling around with a P51 on its 6. I missed the Fw190 when it appeared one year. I fear for the future of airshows now. If there is one?

 
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Sticky847

Swinger
There was a chap in the US(edit and correction - it was a German company - Flug Werke), about 20 years ago, who made a small number of new Fw190s - one of the 'A' types. He used a Russian radial engine and i think the aircraft had modern communications and navigation kit. It struck me as a decent idea - for a type where there is sufficient demand: new very low hours airframes, no risk to an antique or solo surviving examples, etc.
I am not aware of the new build concept having been repeated in many cases, and you wpuld imagine that economic viability would depend upon any new build being a popular type, with a reliable equivalent engine being available.

Photo of a Flug Werke Fw190 -
View attachment 495210
There is an original FW190 flying in the states with its original BMW 801 engine, it was found in a forest near Leningrad in outstanding condition.in 1990
E59F754E-EDAD-4361-AE51-DC195771BE47.jpeg
 

ericferret

War Hero
Yur wrong. Not enuff lift in the air.
Maybe it was a loss of smoke?

A French technical instructor for Airbus explained to us that all the units in their aircraft were powered by smoke.

"When the smoke comes out they stop working"

Saved an awful lot of explanations involving wiring and circuit diagrams.
 

Wooden Wonder

War Hero
...

Mosquito? Isn't it a thoroughbred!
Yes, fast as hell, but was a right vicious bastard on take off and killed many crews with its ferocious torque, and lose an engine? You died…
Hmm, no, rather simplistic. If you lost an engine on take-off, the Mosquito couldn’t climb out until the undercarriage was raised - too much drag from the big oleos and fat tyres. If you could get the undercart up before clearing the trees (say) then it would climb.

In normal flight, no problem.

Landing on one engine, you declared finals at 800’ and lowered the undercarriage - you were committed to landing - go-around was nigh-on impossible unless you could get the undercart back up before 300’.

Mosquito pilots practised these procedures as part of training.

This is not say that accidents (and bad judgement) didn’t happen.

The Hornet could climb out without difficulty on one engine.

How do I know this? Just spoken to the Old Man.
 
I believe there were similar issues with the Beaufighter wrt asymmetric handling. Though I suppose you could say such about any of the high performance twins.
 
...the FAA had enough problems with servicability back in the day, never mind enthusiastic amateurs seventy years down the line.
In a lot of these cases the only aspect the enthusiasts are involved in is raising money to pay professionals to do the ‘real’ work.
 
Maybe with the donk overhauls and the grown up stuff, but there's quite a few crusty old riggers who like to keep their hands dirty for shits and giggles.
 

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