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Scrutiny of US foreign policy

#1
Scrutiny of US foreign policy

Worries over US and British troops in Afghanistan (Report, 17 September) are on the rise as more and more soldiers – and civilians – are killed in this terrible conflict. Concerns also remain over US-Iranian relations; attempts to close the prison in Guantánamo are proving difficult; and renditions continue unabated. The Israelis and Palestinians are locked in stalemate – as before.

Though Obama's leadership has enhanced America's image, as yet there has been no major change from the policies and outcomes of the Bush years. Yet the Obama presidency is still reported in the mainstream media as a happy departure from the "disastrous Dubya". Though we are from opposite ends of the political spectrum, we strongly challenge this. The public, we feel, should be properly informed that the US will pursue its interests, regardless of which party holds power.

Obama presents himself as the "un-Bush". But when you look at substance, rather than style and rhetoric, and the structural constraints on presidential power, you can legitimately question the extent of his ability to change US policies. We call for a richer and better informed debate on US policy abroad. We need to end this unhealthy obsession with personalities and look properly at the issues – an admittedly difficult task given the supremely gifted and charismatic president now in office.

Journalists must be more forthright about the multibillion-dollar Pentagon budget, the massive numbers of US military bases around the world, the sheer scale of the US national security state. If, in Britain, more people knew of the 57 US bases in the UK, we might all be more realistic in our attitudes to that country.

Though it is quite unusual in political circles for left and right, neocon and liberals to come together in this way, it's not unusual for academics and intellectuals to engage with each other constructively and in a grown-up fashion – which may provide the best way to proceed.

Professor Inderjeet Parmar University of Manchester, Dr Mark Ledwidge University of Manchester, Professor Rob Singh Birkbeck College, Dr Tim Lynch Institute for the Study of the Americas


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/sep/18/us-foreign-policy-obama-afghanistan
 
#2
Will you just fuck off you cut&paste trolling mong. We all know how to google, now piss off back to the US cage within this site and stay there. Throbber
 
#4
JonnoJonno said:
Will you just fuck off you cut&paste trolling mong. We all know how to google, now piss off back to the US cage within this site and stay there. Throbber
Well the O2 Thief tag is well earned and the location cited is no doubt accurate. The artice is interesting, your crayoning is not.

STFU
 
H

Hedphelym

Guest
#6
For a guy that seems to be very much fighting for the newspaper corner, it seems somewhat ironic that you are choosing to spend time and effort on an online "current affairs, news and analysis" section.

What Jarhead posts, of which is pretty relevant and interesting is what this whole sodding section is for.

Now fcuk off you mong cnut.
 
#7
It's not a post, it's a bizarre American's idea of constructive debate. Where are his initial arguments for or against the author's point of view? He's like a 3 year old kid saying 'why', 'why' 'why' without having a clue what the answer means.
 
H

Hedphelym

Guest
#8
Yet again you shine with irony.

Someone who gets a nerve touched by people posting news stories online, yet spends time browing an entire section dedicated to that very purpose. And now someone who wants opinions after posting a news story - yet does not give his own to the topic at hand.

You are being just as useless as what you think the good sir Jumpin_Jarhead is. From what I have seen of his posts, they are relevant, interesting and I would have missed them otherwise.

And please, try to be less of a prick. "It's a bizarre American's idea of constructive debate"
He has posted a news article on a News section of a website. I don't think he deserves to be thrown fleeting generalizations such as that.

Or is it just your time of the month?
 
#9
JonnoJonno said:
Will you just fuck off you cut&paste trolling mong. We all know how to google, now piss off back to the US cage within this site and stay there. Throbber
Why so out of sorts today?

I realize from the deep thought evident in most of your posts, my humble contributions to these forums are beneath your razor sharp mind but I thought perhaps lesser mortals might find the information of some meager use.

I do hope you get to feeling better and perhaps it will save you some upset if you merely pass by my pedestrian submissions without wasting you valuable time with them.
 
#10
JonnoJonno said:
Will you just fuck off you cut&paste trolling mong. We all know how to google, now piss off back to the US cage within this site and stay there. Throbber
If your not interested in Armed forces news how about don't read the news section on an Armed forces website.

Whilst this is another cut & paste move I feel you'll be better suited to this forum

 
#11
JonnoJonno said:
Will you just fuck off you cut&paste trolling mong. We all know how to google, now piss off back to the US cage within this site and stay there. Throbber
You, sir, are an embarrassment, ARRSE needs to do a better job of screening out fools like you. You give us all a bad name.
 
#13
jumpinjarhead said:
Scrutiny of US foreign policy

Worries over US and British troops in Afghanistan (Report, 17 September) are on the rise as more and more soldiers – and civilians – are killed in this terrible conflict. Concerns also remain over US-Iranian relations; attempts to close the prison in Guantánamo are proving difficult; and renditions continue unabated. The Israelis and Palestinians are locked in stalemate – as before.

Though Obama's leadership has enhanced America's image, as yet there has been no major change from the policies and outcomes of the Bush years. Yet the Obama presidency is still reported in the mainstream media as a happy departure from the "disastrous Dubya". Though we are from opposite ends of the political spectrum, we strongly challenge this. The public, we feel, should be properly informed that the US will pursue its interests, regardless of which party holds power.

Obama presents himself as the "un-Bush". But when you look at substance, rather than style and rhetoric, and the structural constraints on presidential power, you can legitimately question the extent of his ability to change US policies. We call for a richer and better informed debate on US policy abroad. We need to end this unhealthy obsession with personalities and look properly at the issues – an admittedly difficult task given the supremely gifted and charismatic president now in office.

Journalists must be more forthright about the multibillion-dollar Pentagon budget, the massive numbers of US military bases around the world, the sheer scale of the US national security state. If, in Britain, more people knew of the 57 US bases in the UK, we might all be more realistic in our attitudes to that country.

Though it is quite unusual in political circles for left and right, neocon and liberals to come together in this way, it's not unusual for academics and intellectuals to engage with each other constructively and in a grown-up fashion – which may provide the best way to proceed.

Professor Inderjeet Parmar University of Manchester, Dr Mark Ledwidge University of Manchester, Professor Rob Singh Birkbeck College, Dr Tim Lynch Institute for the Study of the Americas


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/sep/18/us-foreign-policy-obama-afghanistan
It took 4 PhDs to come up with that? I'd be embarrassed.
 
#14
Hedphelym said:
You are being just as useless as what you think the good sir Jumpin_Jarhead is. From what I have seen of his posts, they are relevant, interesting and I would have missed them otherwise.
Just for people like you who like to sit there stroking your beards, pretending to be intellectual, here is the secret to Jumpingjarheads incredible ability to scour the net for relevant articles:

"Welcome to Google Alerts
Google Alerts are email updates of the latest relevant Google results (web, news, etc.) based on your choice of query or topic.

Some handy uses of Google Alerts include:
monitoring a developing news story
keeping current on a competitor or industry
getting the latest on a celebrity or event
keeping tabs on your favorite sports teams
Create an alert with the form on the right."

Of course Google hasn't told him how to have an independent thought on whatever this automated brain-in-a-bottle provides. He posts like a journalist who is looking for the opinion of others without providing one of his own.

Go on google alerts, and if you feel an urge to share an opinion with other beard stroking dullards about a subject you have been given, you could come up with an opinion on it first, and then offer a better post than jumpingmllarhead
 
#15
Whilst not agreeing with Jonno on his main point, I do feel that some of the stuff posted by JJ would be better served in the MultiNational HQ part of the site (although not this article). I must also ask that you post some of YOUR thoughts on the article you post before asking for others responses?

Other than that - Jonno, if you hadn't earned it before, you have now. Well done.
 
#16
crabtastic said:
jumpinjarhead said:
Scrutiny of US foreign policy

Worries over US and British troops in Afghanistan (Report, 17 September) are on the rise as more and more soldiers – and civilians – are killed in this terrible conflict. Concerns also remain over US-Iranian relations; attempts to close the prison in Guantánamo are proving difficult; and renditions continue unabated. The Israelis and Palestinians are locked in stalemate – as before.

Though Obama's leadership has enhanced America's image, as yet there has been no major change from the policies and outcomes of the Bush years. Yet the Obama presidency is still reported in the mainstream media as a happy departure from the "disastrous Dubya". Though we are from opposite ends of the political spectrum, we strongly challenge this. The public, we feel, should be properly informed that the US will pursue its interests, regardless of which party holds power.

Obama presents himself as the "un-Bush". But when you look at substance, rather than style and rhetoric, and the structural constraints on presidential power, you can legitimately question the extent of his ability to change US policies. We call for a richer and better informed debate on US policy abroad. We need to end this unhealthy obsession with personalities and look properly at the issues – an admittedly difficult task given the supremely gifted and charismatic president now in office.

Journalists must be more forthright about the multibillion-dollar Pentagon budget, the massive numbers of US military bases around the world, the sheer scale of the US national security state. If, in Britain, more people knew of the 57 US bases in the UK, we might all be more realistic in our attitudes to that country.

Though it is quite unusual in political circles for left and right, neocon and liberals to come together in this way, it's not unusual for academics and intellectuals to engage with each other constructively and in a grown-up fashion – which may provide the best way to proceed.

Professor Inderjeet Parmar University of Manchester, Dr Mark Ledwidge University of Manchester, Professor Rob Singh Birkbeck College, Dr Tim Lynch Institute for the Study of the Americas


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/sep/18/us-foreign-policy-obama-afghanistan
It took 4 PhDs to come up with that? I'd be embarrassed.
Apparently all Brit PhDs-not the same as yours! ;-) :D
 
#17
MrShanklysboots said:
Whilst not agreeing with Jonno on his main point, I do feel that some of the stuff posted by JJ would be better served in the MultiNational HQ part of the site (although not this article). I must also ask that you post some of YOUR thoughts on the article you post before asking for others responses?

Other than that - Jonno, if you hadn't earned it before, you have now. Well done.
In point of fact, I was asked by another of your veteran (and wholly British) posters of long standing to continue to post whilst he is on holiday. This person routinely posts without commentary so I tried to maintain his "style" by following suit.

I concede, however, that I also try to consider other articles that may be of value in expanding your "horizons" a bit beyond jolly old England and that is why you see some things of "multinational" character. Given the UK's usual MO of operating within coalitions I thought (apparently in error for some of you) that it would do well to get the perspective of other points of view than the usual British press.

As for introductory commentary, in an ideal world I would have the time to provide an in depth analysis of each post for which such a thing is warranted and otherwise appropriate (some are not amenable to that in the first instance), but unlike some of you apparently, I have a day job that does not allow me that luxury. Finally, there are occasions when I make the judgment (again apparently wrongly to some of you) that it would be better to post the piece without steering the discussion in advance.

From several of your posts it also seems a number of you endeavor to play "gotcha" or otherwise need the ego boost of appearing to find the "silver bullet" piece from the vast resources of the internet that everyone else missed. Being relatively resolved to "who" I am such that I am relatively satisfied with my sense of self-worth, this had frankly not occurred to me when I first dipped my toe in the heady world of ARRSE.

In any event, I will state for the record that I do not profess to be omniscient or prescient and readily acknowledge using the standard research tools available to all of us here, supplemented from time to time with personal information or contacts acquired by me over the years. Of course, even using the same tools, it does happen on occasion that I may stumble in my septic ignorance onto something that others may not have seen due to my particular choice of key words and the like. This is certainly not because of any intellectual or analytical advantage over those of you who seem so bothered by the manner in which I post or the content of them.

Nevertheless, in view of the special relationship between our two countries and my desire to "get along" I will try hard to do better so as to do my part in maintaining the collegiality, good will and mutual respect that I know everyone else on ARRSE so reveres and practices. As some of you know from our private exchanges, while I do no particularly worry about others' opinions of me personally, I am always concerned that anything I do post does not ever impugn or diminish the contributions and sacrifices of real warriors, whether they be from the US, the UK or indeed any country that allies itself with us.

Your humble and obedient servant, etc. :D
 
#19
whitecity said:
crabtastic said:
It took 4 PhDs to come up with that? I'd be embarrassed.
Proof that the lowest common denominator theory is alive and well in UK higher education.
Given I suspect you've just flicked through their resumes as I have, I would agree. Sadly, knowing how such people work, I also suspect that letter was about the 58th draft. :oops:
 

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