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Scousers - can they sink any lower?

Looks like some entrepreneurial type has set up a bouncy castle outside the protest at Alder Hey Children's Hospital....Something for the kids to do while Ma & Da shout death threats and shine laser pens at the nurses, no doubt.
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I thought I’d seen it all....but that’s just stomach churning.

So, the title of the thread being ‘Scousers - can they sink any lower?’

The answer to that is yes, and you’re looking at the evidence.
 
Looks like some entrepreneurial type has set up a bouncy castle outside the protest at Alder Hey Children's Hospital.
That's probably shankleyboots cashing in on a bit of grief whoring.
 
Better than Chemical suffocation.
WTF are wibbling about you fecking cretin?

Aside from the brain dead conspiraloons that believe that he is being murdered by doctors at the instruction of the government (who have no involvement in this case other than funding the care!), there is no suggestion that:

a. he is being killed - his life support has been withdrawn, which means that active efforts to keep him alive have stopped, not that anyone is making any efforts to hasten his death.
b. He is not receiving appropriate palliative care, including pain and symptom relief to ease his final days/hours (including - if appropriate - morphine, as you suggested) .

The doctors, so far as I am aware, have never put a definitive timeline on this young lad's death once life support is withdrawn, just that, in their opinion he would not live for long without life support. In my experience Doctors are very reluctant to give definitive prognosis times as they more often prove to be "wrong" than "right". Suggesting that they are incompetent because they can't or won't make or get "wrong" that prediction shows a complete lack of understanding of the uncertainty of the process of end of life care.

The Clinicians and managers involved with this tragic case will live with this for the rest of their lives, and will reflect many times on what they might, or might not have done differently, often at the expense of their own mental well-being. The decision to withdraw life support, or cease active treatment from ANY patient does not come easily, but particularly in the case of children. It is a very rare case when the clinicians have to ask for the courts (NOT the Government!) to intervene, and it is only done when they genuinely believe that it is is the best interests of the patient.

If the best interests of the child would be served by letting them go to Italy, I would very much doubt if there is a person in Alder Hay (or the courts) that would oppose that. I have worked with the Italian Health care system, and I doubt that there is anything that they could do that is not being done already - NHS end of life care is not perfect, but it is some of the best I have seen in the world, and streets ahead of the rest of most of Europe (and Galaxies away from ends of life care in the US!). The care in Italy would even be funded by the NHS (despite the current financial challenges) if that was felt to be the right thing. I commented before on a similar thread how I have been personally involved in sourcing and arranging care overseas at public expense for sick children, where it is felt that would deliver the best outcome.
 
WTF are wibbling about you fecking cretin?

Aside from the brain dead conspiraloons that believe that he is being murdered by doctors at the instruction of the government (who have no involvement in this case other than funding the care!), there is no suggestion that:

a. he is being killed - his life support has been withdrawn, which means that active efforts to keep him alive have stopped, not that anyone is making any efforts to hasten his death.
b. He is not receiving appropriate palliative care, including pain and symptom relief to ease his final days/hours (including - if appropriate - morphine, as you suggested) .

The doctors, so far as I am aware, have never put a definitive timeline on this young lad's death once life support is withdrawn, just that, in their opinion he would not live for long without life support. In my experience Doctors are very reluctant to give definitive prognosis times as they more often prove to be "wrong" than "right". Suggesting that they are incompetent because they can't or won't make or get "wrong" that prediction shows a complete lack of understanding of the uncertainty of the process of end of life care.

The Clinicians and managers involved with this tragic case will live with this for the rest of their lives, and will reflect many times on what they might, or might not have done differently, often at the expense of their own mental well-being. The decision to withdraw life support, or cease active treatment from ANY patient does not come easily, but particularly in the case of children. It is a very rare case when the clinicians have to ask for the courts (NOT the Government!) to intervene, and it is only done when they genuinely believe that it is is the best interests of the patient.

If the best interests of the child would be served by letting them go to Italy, I would very much doubt if there is a person in Alder Hay (or the courts) that would oppose that. I have worked with the Italian Health care system, and I doubt that there is anything that they could do that is not being done already - NHS end of life care is not perfect, but it is some of the best I have seen in the world, and streets ahead of the rest of most of Europe (and Galaxies away from ends of life care in the US!). The care in Italy would even be funded by the NHS (despite the current financial challenges) if that was felt to be the right thing. I commented before on a similar thread how I have been personally involved in sourcing and arranging care overseas at public expense for sick children, where it is felt that would deliver the best outcome.
I think we can close this thread now.
This post sums it up perfectly.
Having spent some time today with my terminally-ill mother, mortality is much on my mind.
Dignity? She has little.
There ain't gonna be no miracle cure.
All we can do is offer comfort in her final days, and support my Dad, who has to deal with it 24/7. NOT make a wibble-fest over 'they should have... why didn't they?' etc etc et'
Too late.
Yes, bloody rough on everybody, especially my nippers, but we know it is going to happen, and have prepared for it.
Remember Mum at her best, not as she is now.
And with Alife, the same. Spend time with him, not cnuting about at press conferences or on TV shows.
 
They're embarrassing themselves, granted. My first post in this thread called them fools. So do most residents of my fair city.
They seem to have a fair bit of support. You own that bouncy castle don't you?
 
I liked the interviews where he was quoting the doctors and adding "but in my opinion".

I see the parents have separate legal teams, funny how we've only heard one voice in the interviews, I'm wondering if shes binned him for being a bit of a publicity hungry twat or just a twat basically.
I wonder how much this pointless case has cost the NHS/taxpayers because I'm pretty certain they're paying both sides' legal expenses.
 
With this air ambulance flying in and out. And the gig with the Vatican hospital. Would it not be less trouble to fly the Pope in?
Is it possible that the air ambulance is flying in and out because it is bringing in critical paediatric cases from parts of the country not blessed with a specialist children's hospital, and not because they're in an on again/off again indecision process over this nipper?
 

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