Scottish Train Derail

Those pictures brought brought back memories of the train accident I was sent to when I was a young airman. It was the first time I had seen the innards of the human body and it wasn't a pretty sight. Thoughts with the rescuers and the folks who have to pick up the pieces.
My first 'proper' day on the railway was spent with the Signalling Inspector Jim Lawler (RIP Jim), ex Army medic and Suez veteran, attending a suicide ("You've been in the Forces, so you've seen blood and guts, so come with me!" I didn't like to tell him that the worst 'blood & guts' I'd seen was some particularly nasty nosebleeds after Mess Rugby...). The lads were picking up the 'bits' with long wooden tongs and putting them into bags. One lad was turning green when Jim walks up to him with a shoe in his hand... The toecap was split open and the foot was still very much inside. Jim said "This little piggy went to market..."

It's funny, but some people don't appreciate a 'military' sense of humour...
 

Dredd

LE
That bit isn't really fair to the Victorian engineers, I don't think they cut any corners on drainage, culverts etc,.
And they weren't really envisioning the speeds that would be routine on large parts of the track either.

I think the comment was more to indicate the age that the network has been in existence rather than as a slur on their engineering competence.
 
Many rail services have to run by law, regardless of how many are on them.
Is that quite right?

There are a few so-called 'parliamentary services' which are occasional unadvertised services which generally run empty in order to justify the continuing existence of a particular route.

All existing railway routes are enabled under an act of parliament. Abolition of the physical route similarly requires an act of parliament (not always adhered to). That's not quite the same as running a service by law, unless you're referring to the contractual obligation of an operating franchise.
 
I think it is a tribute to their design (and massive over-engineering) that Victorian infrastructure remains the backbone of the current network.
Not just the UK of course and all done with private rather than public finance. A couple of paragraphs from The British Overseas Railways Historical Trust:

The railway as we know it today was invented in Britain in the early part of the nineteenth century and Britain exported railways and railway equipment to virtually every country in the World. Those railways brought economic growth and political stability to the countries in which they were built. Edwin Arnold in 1865 said, "Railways may do for India what dynasties have never done... they may make India a nation" and they did.

British engineers built many times more miles of railway and overcame far greater civil engineering challenges abroad than here in Britain. Many of the railways were owned and financed by British companies, not only in the Empire, but elsewhere, especially in South America.

The British Overseas Railways Historical Trust Introduction
 

syrup

LE
My first 'proper' day on the railway was spent with the Signalling Inspector Jim Lawler (RIP Jim), ex Army medic and Suez veteran, attending a suicide ("You've been in the Forces, so you've seen blood and guts, so come with me!" I didn't like to tell him that the worst 'blood & guts' I'd seen was some particularly nasty nosebleeds after Mess Rugby...). The lads were picking up the 'bits' with long wooden tongs and putting them into bags. One lad was turning green when Jim walks up to him with a shoe in his hand... The toecap was split open and the foot was still very much inside. Jim said "This little piggy went to market..."

It's funny, but some people don't appreciate a 'military' sense of humour...

Mrs_S was onboard one that had a jumper a year or so ago.
Hit the front of the train went flying down into the crew window at the front of first class and splattered all over that causing lots of damage.
One woman kicked off about why the train had suddenly stopped and what was the delays.
It was explained that there had been an incident and that they were waiting for the emergency services and would be returning to Edinburgh.
She kept ranting until one of the crew pointed out to her that the mess on the window had been a human being and the f***ing train wasn't going anywhere until they had been collected up and taken away.
Cue tears and mutterings off I can't believe he just spoke to me like that
 
Mrs_S was onboard one that had a jumper a year or so ago.
Hit the front of the train went flying down into the crew window at the front of first class and splattered all over that causing lots of damage.
One woman kicked off about why the train had suddenly stopped and what was the delays.
It was explained that there had been an incident and that they were waiting for the emergency services and would be returning to Edinburgh.
She kept ranting until one of the crew pointed out to her that the mess on the window had been a human being and the f***ing train wasn't going anywhere until they had been collected up and taken away.
Cue tears and mutterings off I can't believe he just spoke to me like that
Been waiting for a train when that has happened. The biggest moans came from a certain demographic of mobile-phone-to-the nose, Costa coffee carrying, sunglasses on the head passengers who complained how inconsiderate the jumper had been in delaying their travel plans. Selfish ignorance on display in spades.
 
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Those pictures brought brought back memories of the train accident I was sent to when I was a young airman. It was the first time I had seen the innards of the human body and it wasn't a pretty sight. Thoughts with the rescuers and the folks who have to pick up the pieces.
Wasn't Selby by any chance? I remember we authorised RAF MACA for that.
 

cymraeg

War Hero
Mrs_S was onboard one that had a jumper a year or so ago.
Hit the front of the train went flying down into the crew window at the front of first class and splattered all over that causing lots of damage.
One woman kicked off about why the train had suddenly stopped and what was the delays.
It was explained that there had been an incident and that they were waiting for the emergency services and would be returning to Edinburgh.
She kept ranting until one of the crew pointed out to her that the mess on the window had been a human being and the f***ing train wasn't going anywhere until they had been collected up and taken away.
Cue tears and mutterings off I can't believe he just spoke to me like that
In a similar vein on one of our services. An elderly chap has a massive heart attack on the train. Driver managed to stop quite quickly in a platform and emergency services called whilst another a qualified first responder who was travelling on the service is doing what he can for the poor ******.

Whilst awaiting the ambulance driver is accosted by a self important fuckwit who really must not be late for his meeting or whatever and suggests they turf the old codger off to the platform to await the ambulance and then the train could continue.

Driver rodded him off in most spectacular fashion.

People are so self centred these days
 
Is that quite right?

There are a few so-called 'parliamentary services' which are occasional unadvertised services which generally run empty in order to justify the continuing existence of a particular route.

All existing railway routes are enabled under an act of parliament. Abolition of the physical route similarly requires an act of parliament (not always adhered to). That's not quite the same as running a service by law, unless you're referring to the contractual obligation of an operating franchise.

I believe it is correct

Only reason I say it is because we supply several railway companies that have been massively impacted by KungFlu. Obviously we've been hit pretty hard by loss of sales to them.
Back in April there was talk of cutting a lot of services altogether but they could not do so without government consent.
Whether its correct or not I'm not certain but one of them did tell me that stopping running some of the major routes would take an act of parliament or they would deep in the doodoo.

Very much a case or running the service even if it was empty or else

Caveat being, I'm not involved in the rail industry but work in a service industry supplying several of the big rail operators.
Take it as third hand rather than gospel but I was told the above by somebody quite senior in one of the train companies.

I took it at face value and didn't delve in to it but the operators have run the services right through the apocalypse empty or not
 
I took it at face value and didn't delve in to it but the operators have run the services right through the apocalypse empty or not
I suspect that might have had more to do with contractual obligation than anything else. I doubt if there is a clause that excludes them from having to operate to their agreed timetable, even in times of worldwide pandemic.

I may be wrong.
 
This popped up on faceache from locals yesterday evening

❤Honestly some days I could greet at the kindness of some people.❤

**this is absolutely nothing to do with me I only asked and delivered**

I thought a lot about whether or not I should post this but it’s about the local kindness that’s been shown.

The train crash today has really left a dark cloud over the North East (and further afield of course)
It’s been such a hot day here today and I asked the local Scotmid in Laurencekirk if they would donate some juice and snacks to donate to the rescuers, crew, police etc that were on the scene. They donated without any hesitation.
I then contacted The Alma curry house in Laurencekirk to see if they could afford to donate any meals to those still on site (of which there are a lot) Again without hesitation they said yes. Honestly the amount of food is just astounding.
This is a really tough time for businesses and especially local ones so for them to do this was just so kind.
Feel free to spread the word about these places so they get the recognition they deserve for their kindness.
Such a sad night for those families though
Alma indian restaurant and bar
Scotmid Co-operative

117439244_10157707575328719_2418442384407478033_n.jpg
80749852_10219333638918952_7485795841337196544_o.jpg
 
That was a major cock up all round with the hauliers trying to cross a mainline with a massive transformer.
Just a few years later & a couple of miles away was the Colwich ‘unpleasentness’ where the innocent driver got killed.
Apols for slight thread drift.

It was indeed a major cock-up. The vehicle had a police escort because of its size. The driver thought the police were responsible for checking that it was safe to cross and the police claimed it was the responsibility of the driver of the low-loader. At the subsequent inquiry, the police were absolved of any responsibility for the crash through a ruling that they, as escort, weren't responsible checking with the signalman that it was safe to use the crossing - thus the blame fell on the driver of the low-loader and the company had to pick up the insurance bill. That ruling caused a bit of an uproar with Wynn's, who were the haulier, who queried the whole requirement to have an escort, if the escort had no responsibility for the convoy's safety. The controversy was still rumbling on when I left Stafford a few months later.
 
Apols for slight thread drift.

It was indeed a major cock-up. The vehicle had a police escort because of its size. The driver thought the police were responsible for checking that it was safe to cross and the police claimed it was the responsibility of the driver of the low-loader. At the subsequent inquiry...……..
I read an interesting article on the 50th anniversary. As usual, a lot of things nobody had thought about. You mention the confusion about who should have contacted who. I think there was another communication problem within the railway's procedures. Also something about crossing signs not being clear about "large and slow" vehicles - IIRC signs now define this.
 
I read an interesting article on the 50th anniversary. As usual, a lot of things nobody had thought about. You mention the confusion about who should have contacted who. I think there was another communication problem within the railway's procedures. Also something about crossing signs not being clear about "large and slow" vehicles - IIRC signs now define this.
Nothing quite covered the scenario where a JCB driver lowered the jacks and turned his seat around to operate the rear digger-arm in the middle of one of our fully-automatic crossings... Some say that there was a glimpse of a purple hi-vis vest and the whiff of sulphur in the air that day...
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I think it is a tribute to their design (and massive over-engineering) that Victorian infrastructure remains the backbone of the current network.
Sometimes it did take them a couple of attempts to get it right.

Tay Bridge, Bull Bridge, Inverythan Bridge, Norwood Junction, Dee Bridge etc etc
 
In a similar vein on one of our services. An elderly chap has a massive heart attack on the train. Driver managed to stop quite quickly in a platform and emergency services called whilst another a qualified first responder who was travelling on the service is doing what he can for the poor ******.

Whilst awaiting the ambulance driver is accosted by a self important fuckwit who really must not be late for his meeting or whatever and suggests they turf the old codger off to the platform to await the ambulance and then the train could continue.

Driver rodded him off in most spectacular fashion.

People are so self centred these days
Reminds me of the story about plane just pulled up at the terminal, guy elbowing past everyone except one who wouldn't move out the way Mr Elbows "I have a very important meeting to get to, let me past!" Blocker "If you were important they'd delay the meeting until you arrived". Never had the opportunity to use it yet.
 

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