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Scottish Train Derail

RE don't have much to offer here, civil industry is far better equipped. You are are going to need some serious lifting kit here. Think Liebherr 800ton cranes.

We used to have rail based cranes, I think Volker have some. Grayrigg they used road cranes to remove the rolling stock.

Either way it looks like a pig of a location. I saw footage of coastguard vehicles heading into the site so I'm assuming they need to use ropes to access.

I'm speculating, but it looks like stock may have rolled off down a bank or something like that.
If the descriptions of the location that I've seen are accurate, it's in a fairly steep sided cutting in the area of the map below.

1597245654935.png
 
Also, I note that the Beeb have just had an utterly pointless interview with "the SNP MP for Aberdeenshire" from her car, who obviously has nothing to add, and no real knowledge, without acknowledging that this seems to have happened on the Conservative MP's patch.

She is the MSP for the area in question so has every right, indeed responsibility, to issue some sort of statement, even if it is not particularly enlightening. Exactly what you would expect from any politician who has such an incident take place in their constituency.
 
Only just managed to get back online after last nights spectacular storm. Was chatting to me cousin who stays in Stonehaven she says it was horrendous there last night.

RIP and speedy recovery to those killed and injured.
 

theinventor

Old-Salt
If the reports of 1 driver, 3 crew and 6 pax are to be believed, that's a huge amount of moving parts just to get 6 bods to work.
Likely another factor challenging the economics of rail in such areas.
 
RE don't have much to offer here, civil industry is far better equipped. You are are going to need some serious lifting kit here. Think Liebherr 800ton cranes.

We used to have rail based cranes, I think Volker have some. Grayrigg they used road cranes to remove the rolling stock.

Either way it looks like a pig of a location. I saw footage of coastguard vehicles heading into the site so I'm assuming they need to use ropes to access.

I'm speculating, but it looks like stock may have rolled off down a bank or something like that.
I was meaning more about creating access for the heavy civil plant. RE did a cracking job at Boscastle in that regard, for example.
 
If the reports of 1 driver, 3 crew and 6 pax are to be believed, that's a huge amount of moving parts just to get 6 bods to work.
Likely another factor challenging the economics of rail in such areas.
Don't forget that Aberdeen is on heightened COVID restrictions, which includes a 5 mile travel restriction, so there would probably be fewer people on the train than normal. Plus it was outbound from Aberdeen, and at that time most commuters would be inbound.
 
If the descriptions of the location that I've seen are accurate, it's in a fairly steep sided cutting in the area of the map below.

I know the route fairly well as it's been part of my commute for quite a few years. Going by what I've seen from the footage and pictures so far, my best effort at an estimated location is within the red circle below (towards the top, NE end of the map in lastwalt's post).
1597246385977.png
 
I know the route fairly well as it's been part of my commute for quite a few years. Going by what I've seen from the footage and pictures so far, my best effort at an estimated location is within the red circle below (towards the top, NE end of the map in lastwalt's post).
View attachment 496532
That's where I was looking too, albeit on google maps, satellite view. Those contour lines help give a better impression of the steep sides.
 
I was meaning more about creating access for the heavy civil plant. RE did a cracking job at Boscastle in that regard, for example.

Network Rail and their contractors have done it all before. Grayrigg already mentioned, it didn't take long to put in roads and hardstandings for the cranes.
 
I know the route fairly well as it's been part of my commute for quite a few years. Going by what I've seen from the footage and pictures so far, my best effort at an estimated location is within the red circle below (towards the top, NE end of the map in lastwalt's post).
View attachment 496532
Daily Mail has photos of Coastguard landrovers and a digger driving along the track, having accessed it from a level crossing, if that helps? I presume they are using the Coastguard's clifftop winching expertise for access down the hillside.
 

shiny

Old-Salt
A typical quote from Mick Cash the leader of the RMT Union about the fact they are there to help all drivers and staff affected. Not a peep about any passengers and he hopes they are okay. I bet they turn it into a not enough guards on the train thats why we strike ballacks. Union scum.
 
It was like the four horsemen here last night. The road outside my gaff has a massive big cutting grooved out from all the rainfall. Never seen so much lightening or heard so much thunder in this part of Scotland before. Hoping for the best for the poor buggers on that train.

Same down my way. Thunderstorm just seemed to park over Edinburgh for a couple of hours. Lightning strikes every few minutes. The sheer weight of the rainfall flattened plants and grass.

There's a big hole at the end of my road. But whether that was the storm or the Edinburgh council crew who were supposed to be resurfacing it is anyone's guess.
 
Daily Mail has photos of Coastguard landrovers and a digger driving along the track, having accessed it from a level crossing, if that helps? I presume they are using the Coastguard's clifftop winching expertise for access down the hillside.

That makes sense, it's near the coast so CG might be closer than Mountain Rescue.
 
A typical quote from Mick Cash the leader of the RMT Union about the fact they are there to help all drivers and staff affected. Not a peep about any passengers and he hopes they are okay. I bet they turn it into a not enough guards on the train thats why we strike ballacks. Union scum.

One of the main roles of the guard is/was to protect the train in the event of a breakdown/accident/etc.
Whilst the driver got on to the 'box, the guard would go back and lay protection, apply track circuit clips etc.

Likewise with suicides or other struck objects, the driver stays with the train whilst the guard goes back to see what was hit, etc.

Guards are pretty useful, especially when a train is underway there isn't much the driver can do when he's driving a train. And i totally understand why drivers don't want to operate doors too.
 
One of the main roles of the guard is/was to protect the train in the event of a breakdown/accident/etc.
Whilst the driver got on to the 'box, the guard would go back and lay protection, apply track circuit clips etc.

Likewise with suicides or other struck objects, the driver stays with the train whilst the guard goes back to see what was hit, etc.

Guards are pretty useful, especially when a train is underway there isn't much the driver can do when he's driving a train. And i totally understand why drivers don't want to operate doors too.
All the reports suggest three crew aboard. Not sure what would be normal for an HS125? Driver, guard, plus? Steward or conductor type? Or another crewman getting a lift?

EDIT - should have said AT LEAST three aboard. Some reports claiming as many as six.
 

shiny

Old-Salt
One of the main roles of the guard is/was to protect the train in the event of a breakdown/accident/etc.
Whilst the driver got on to the 'box, the guard would go back and lay protection, apply track circuit clips etc.

Likewise with suicides or other struck objects, the driver stays with the train whilst the guard goes back to see what was hit, etc.

Guards are pretty useful, especially when a train is underway there isn't much the driver can do when he's driving a train. And i totally understand why drivers don't want to operate doors too.
I can't disagree with anything you said. Its more the way the lefty unions will jump on this sad event with glee. That and the lack of empathy in their statements for anyone but their members.
 

syrup

LE
All the reports suggest three crew aboard. Not sure what would be normal for an HS125? Driver, guard, plus? Steward or conductor type? Or another crewman getting a lift?

EDIT - should have said AT LEAST three aboard. Some reports claiming as many as six.


Six would be about right Mrs_ S used to work on board and they had a crew of 6
Driver, guard, 2 first class carriages staff and 2 standard class carriages staff.
 

syrup

LE
If the reports of 1 driver, 3 crew and 6 pax are to be believed, that's a huge amount of moving parts just to get 6 bods to work.
Likely another factor challenging the economics of rail in such areas.

Talking to someone the other day and he said that York to Edinburgh and York to London on some trains normally hold 71 pax per carriage.
With social distancing etc some trains are down to 16 pax per carriage.
Nice if you're a passenger but some companies who aren't under Government ownership are losing money hand over fist
 
I wonder to what degree the subsequent fire was responsible for the deaths and injuries.

I am reminded of the worst rail crash in Britain, which took place at Quintinshill, near Gretna in 1915. As the result of the confused actions of signalmen, a troop train crashed into a waiting local train. The crash was exacerbated when a Glasgow sleeper crashed into the wreckage of the previous crash.

The majority of fatalities (227) were caused as the result of the lighting gas on the troop train exploding and causing the wooden bodied carriages to catch fire. It is said that the coup-de-grace was delivered by their officers on some of the casualties hopelessly trapped in the burning wreckage and who were screaming for mercy.

Although an entirely different set of circumstances, with more modern equipment and rolling stock, it seems that fire still presents a very real secondary threat in a railway accident.
 

NSP

LE
Either way it looks like a pig of a location. I saw footage of coastguard vehicles heading into the site so I'm assuming they need to use ropes to access.
Could that be because CG tends to tool around in nice blue Landies with yellow roofs - and 4WD with big, chunky offroad tyres...? From what I can see they're all parked up in an adjacent field, right after heavy rain. Wouldn't surprise me if a few of those ambulances won't need a bit of help getting back to the road.
 

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