Scottish Train Derail

We don’t know what instructions he was given by the signaller, yet. But we should never assume as... you know the rest!
It would have been something along the lines of

"You are authorised to proceed at caution, wrong-direction as far as the crossover, which is set and locked for you to cross over onto the opposite line. You may then proceed in the right direction at full line speed and obey all other signals."

There would be absolutely no reason for the driver to proceed at caution once he had crossed over to the opposite line. As has been said, he had already passed that way sometime earlier without incident and another train (the one who reported the first landslip) had also passed along that line. No landslip had been reported on that section. I'm surprised that there wasn't a blanket speed restriction due to the extreme weather conditions, however (e.g. we had a blanket 50mph speed restriction yesterday due to the storm. That was made more excessive in some areas along the coast and some sections on sea walls etc were then closed altogether).
 
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It is a long time since I worked track side, but there are telephones on every signal post, and the direction to the nearest one is indicated on trackside hardware. The telephones are of the pick up and speak type, and connect to the nearest manned signal box automatically.
Yes, Signal Post Telephones (SPTs) are still a 'thing', even though they are hardly ever used (and generally only by people on the track) since the introduction of GSMR comms. It can be a very long distance between signals though, depending on the length of the sections (some of mine are 8 miles apart).
 
I thought . . . that if you put something metal across the two rails, it caused a "shortage" (somewhere), and tripped all the lights to red ?!

Yes, I know not everyone carries an alloy step-ladder on their train journeys, but plenty of fencing-wire lining the tracks.
Yes in theory, provided that the line is signalled using 'Track Circuits' and that they actually use traditional TCs (i.e. a low-voltage electrical current running through the rails). If you're on a traditional 'Absolute Block' line or a single line operated by token the only TCs will be in the 'berth' of signal posts and/or on points or within station limits. Some TCs are actually operated by a radio signal transmitted by the train as it travels along, some are actually treadles that are depressed by the train and some are 'axle-counters' (photo-electric cell which counts all the wheels in and counts them out again at the other end). The circuit can also be blocked by rust and contamination from grease and dirt, so Track Circuit Clips (or metal bars/wires placed across the track) can't be fully relied upon to stop trains.

Trains still carry Track Circuit Clips though, and the train crew will normally slap one down on the opposite line of an incident as an immediate action to try to stop trains on the opposite line passing by at full line speed and ploughing through wreckage or people on the track. The line they're on will normally be already shown as 'occupied' by the train in any case - it's the other line(s) you have to worry about. Detonators will also be placed further out if they don't have comms with the signalman, but the most effective method to protect the site is to get comms.
 
Can I ask a question that might seem totally stupid to those of you in the know but which has cropped up recently in a minor way at work?

Do we no longer refer to the big noisy thing at the front of a train with the engine in it as a "locomotive" as I had always thought they were called? Is "power car" the correct terminology now? I ask as I occasionally have to edit reports of a technical nature and I prefer to get these things right.
As I understand it, a 'power car' is an integral part of the train, with a driving cab at one end and the other end semi-permanently coupled to the train. Power cars can also include passenger accommodation. Locos have a driving cab at both ends.
 
As I understand it, a 'power car' is an integral part of the train, with a driving cab at one end and the other end semi-permanently coupled to the train. Power cars can also include passenger accommodation. Locos have a driving cab at both ends.

Agreed. I don't know the names, but all the newer passenger trains are integral units with engines under several of the cars. Like a Pacer but bigger, better and faster.
 
Agreed. I don't know the names, but all the newer passenger trains are integral units with engines under several of the cars. Like a Pacer but bigger, better and faster.

DMU & EMUs usually.

There’s no passenger accommodation in the power cars. There was a guards office in them when originally built, but it was moved into the train in the TGS coach due to noise and fumes.
They also used them for parcels, but that doesn’t happen now. The area is used for the AFFF fire equipment and emergency coupling gear. As well as the air system dryers & traction motor blowers.
 
DMU & EMUs usually.

There’s no passenger accommodation in the power cars. There was a guards office in them when originally built, but it was moved into the train in the TGS coach due to noise and fumes.
They also used them for parcels, but that doesn’t happen now. The area is used for the AFFF fire equipment and emergency coupling gear. As well as the air system dryers & traction motor blowers.
Yeah I was thinking of the more modern ones wrt passenger accommodation - the Hitachi jobs that have now replaced Class 43 HSTs in GWR.
 
Agreed. I don't know the names, but all the newer passenger trains are integral units with engines under several of the cars. Like a Pacer but bigger, better and faster.
This cat was threatened with a journey on a Pacer.
photo-532.gif
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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ugly

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Some TCs are actually operated by a radio signal transmitted by the train as it travels along, some are actually treadles that are depressed by the train and some are 'axle-counters' (photo-electric cell which counts all the wheels in and counts them out again at the other end)
Not pe cells but electro magnetic fields which when broken by a wheel cause an evaluator to count the breaks
 

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