Scottish Politics Thread

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
'Consensual' stop and search is bullshit. With one or two exceptions, you either have reasonable grounds to suspect or you don't. If you do, the relevant statute gives you the authority to search someone. If you don't have reasonable grounds to suspect, the use of 'consensual' search is unethical, if not downright unlawful.
There's been a few interesting things cropping up re "Consensual" Stop & Search especially with regard to minors - yes 9 years olds are being asked to give their consent to being searched.

Another was fascinating, more an indicator of massaging figures though, a "Stop & Search" for Cannabis/drugs that does not turn up drugs but turns up cider can be recorded as a success.

Scottish S&S figures rival those of New York.

Can't find the links atm.
 
Well that would be nice. A Labour Party in Government with a weak, useless PM not merely in the grip of Unions but having to hose vast amounts of cash North of the border to appease the SNP.

With Alex Salmond as Deputy PM.
What a scary scenario. To think we thought Big Eck was off to cut peat in a Highland constituency only to find him as the puppeteer behind the Westminster throne. That's Irn Bru back on the lunch menu!
 

Blogg

LE
What a scary scenario. To think we thought Big Eck was off to cut peat in a Highland constituency only to find him as the puppeteer behind the Westminster throne. That's Irn Bru back on the lunch menu!
Well he is trying to get into Gordon Brown's former constituency.

It is a really horrible, horrible scenario even without Salmond in Westminster.
 
Well he is trying to get into Gordon Brown's former constituency.

It is a really horrible, horrible scenario even without Salmond in Westminster.
I thought he was standing for the constituency of Gordon in Aberdeenshire - Brown is MP for Kirkcaldy in Fife.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
How dare you sully the memory of a poor, dead man and a relative of mine.
It was ******* 4 x 4, we're not cheap around here.
If he was one of the Tartan Army I saw marauding round the underground that night, he has my utmost respect. They terrified me!
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Here's my take on the current stop and search controversy.

Fifteen years ago, Glasgow, and west central Scotland in general, found itself with the unenviable reputation as being the murder capital of Western Europe. Knife crime was endemic, drug use rife and kids as young as ten were getting shit faced on Buckie every evening. Strathclyde Police responded to this with a strategy which included, amongst other less in-your-face tactics, a robust use of stop and search. To their credit, the strategy has proved pretty successful and knife crime is at a record low.

In 2013, however, Police Scotland is created. The then Chief Constable of Strathclyde, Stephen House, is appointed Chief Constable of the new Scottish force. Despite previous assurances that the new force will be responsive through divisional commanders to local needs and priorities, a number of Key Performance Indicators are established, by which all divisions will be measured. One of these KPIs is the number of stop and searches carried out.

The simple fact is, however, that the endemic knife carrying of west central Scotland simply does not apply elsewhere in the country. Kids in Inverness, Edinburgh, Dumfries and Perth don't reach for the machete when they go out to meet their pals. In my 30 years working in urban and rural areas, I rarely dealt with youths carrying knives. Senior officers brave enough to call this policy for they public alienating bullshit it is, are removed from operational command positions until House has a compliant senior management who will do his bidding.

'Consensual' stop and search is bullshit. With one or two exceptions, you either have reasonable grounds to suspect or you don't. If you do, the relevant statute gives you the authority to search someone. If you don't have reasonable grounds to suspect, the use of 'consensual' search is unethical, if not downright unlawful.

So that's it. The desire by a managerialist chief constable to apply a strategy designed for one part of the country to the whole, demanding the use of iffy powers and dismissing anyone who questions the policy. I'm surprised that no solicitors have seen the class action potential in this.
Well if a gentleman armed with a glock asks me if I mind him searching me, I'm sure I'd agree too!
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
According to a couple of pundits on Radio Scotland, SNP are currently set to be third largest party in HoC after May.

Not sure if the final figures will reflect that but it's going to be a close run thing
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
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Here's my take on the current stop and search controversy.

Fifteen years ago, Glasgow, and west central Scotland in general, found itself with the unenviable reputation as being the murder capital of Western Europe. Knife crime was endemic, drug use rife and kids as young as ten were getting shit faced on Buckie every evening. Strathclyde Police responded to this with a strategy which included, amongst other less in-your-face tactics, a robust use of stop and search. To their credit, the strategy has proved pretty successful and knife crime is at a record low.

In 2013, however, Police Scotland is created. The then Chief Constable of Strathclyde, Stephen House, is appointed Chief Constable of the new Scottish force. Despite previous assurances that the new force will be responsive through divisional commanders to local needs and priorities, a number of Key Performance Indicators are established, by which all divisions will be measured. One of these KPIs is the number of stop and searches carried out.

The simple fact is, however, that the endemic knife carrying of west central Scotland simply does not apply elsewhere in the country. Kids in Inverness, Edinburgh, Dumfries and Perth don't reach for the machete when they go out to meet their pals. In my 30 years working in urban and rural areas, I rarely dealt with youths carrying knives. Senior officers brave enough to call this policy for they public alienating bullshit it is, are removed from operational command positions until House has a compliant senior management who will do his bidding.

'Consensual' stop and search is bullshit. With one or two exceptions, you either have reasonable grounds to suspect or you don't. If you do, the relevant statute gives you the authority to search someone. If you don't have reasonable grounds to suspect, the use of 'consensual' search is unethical, if not downright unlawful.

So that's it. The desire by a managerialist chief constable to apply a strategy designed for one part of the country to the whole, demanding the use of iffy powers and dismissing anyone who questions the policy. I'm surprised that no solicitors have seen the class action potential in this.
I get the feeling that Scotland's Chief Constable thinks he has no one to report to. He seems to be working on the basis that he will do what he likes until he is forced to stop, either by public opinion or by the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood - and I am not so sure he pays much attention to Holyrood.

Chief Constables in England are directed and kept on track as the Home Office oversees their work and can bring them to task. There do not appear to be any effective checks and balances on Sir Steven House. I suspect this will end in a very acrimonious sacking of Sir SH at some point.
 
I get the feeling that Scotland's Chief Constable thinks he has no one to report to. He seems to be working on the basis that he will do what he likes until he is forced to stop, either by public opinion or by the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood - and I am not so sure he pays much attention to Holyrood.

Chief Constables in England are directed and kept on track as the Home Office oversees their work and can bring them to task. There do not appear to be any effective checks and balances on Sir Steven House. I suspect this will end in a very acrimonious sacking of Sir SH at some point.
HMRC did ahem well nuff said
http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/top-stories/house-hits-out-at-23m-police-scotland-tax-bill-1-3615220
 
I get the feeling that Scotland's Chief Constable thinks he has no one to report to. He seems to be working on the basis that he will do what he likes until he is forced to stop, either by public opinion or by the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood - and I am not so sure he pays much attention to Holyrood.

Chief Constables in England are directed and kept on track as the Home Office oversees their work and can bring them to task. There do not appear to be any effective checks and balances on Sir Steven House. I suspect this will end in a very acrimonious sacking of Sir SH at some point.
The waters are muddied by the principle that 'operational' decisions are reserved to the Chief Constable. The overt arming of officers, for example, could be construed as an operational decision, and within his right to implement, however, it was pretty naive, in my opinion, to start sending openly armed officers to routine incidents and not expect some sort of public reaction. The problem is that his management style is to offload those who he either thinks aren't up to it or who have challenged his views. That has left a command team loaded with either yes men (and women) or those too weak willed to speak up. In the past, national policing policy would be agreed by ACPO(Scotland) where each of the eight Chief Constables could offer an equal opinion and agree on national policy. Not now. What Steve says, goes. What must now happen is that he Scottish Parliament, via the justice committee, or by creation of a policing committee, be empowered to hold the Chief Constable to account on matters of policy. The problem of course, is how you square that with the operational independence of the Police.
 

Auld-Yin

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The waters are muddied by the principle that 'operational' decisions are reserved to the Chief Constable. The overt arming of officers, for example, could be construed as an operational decision, and within his right to implement, however, it was pretty naive, in my opinion, to start sending openly armed officers to routine incidents and not expect some sort of public reaction. The problem is that his management style is to offload those who he either thinks aren't up to it or who have challenged his views. That has left a command team loaded with either yes men (and women) or those too weak willed to speak up. In the past, national policing policy would be agreed by ACPO(Scotland) where each of the eight Chief Constables could offer an equal opinion and agree on national policy. Not now. What Steve says, goes. What must now happen is that he Scottish Parliament, via the justice committee, or by creation of a policing committee, be empowered to hold the Chief Constable to account on matters of policy. The problem of course, is how you square that with the operational independence of the Police.
I dont think that House was naive in any way whatsoever. He saw that he is top of a tree with no obstructions to his decisions.

What I found profoundly astonishing is the way the Police Fed Reps are backing him up rather than questioning his decisions. Very worrying.

I don't think House is a bad person, but I am suspect of his powers, his understanding of what those powers are and the apparent inability of the politicians to control him. Not a healthy state of affairs.
 
He he, I hope Scotland realises that VAT is a European tax and that as good pro Europeans you have to pay it.:-D Of course that depends on what services the VAT is being paid on. The article isn't specific. Nor is it correct that other departments don't pay it unless of course they don't charge for their services. I've always said that internal departmental accounting is a nonsense, it's just a claw back to make the Public sector cheaper. Just another case of mewling.
 
I dont think that House was naive in any way whatsoever. He saw that he is top of a tree with no obstructions to his decisions.

What I found profoundly astonishing is the way the Police Fed Reps are backing him up rather than questioning his decisions. Very worrying.

I don't think House is a bad person, but I am suspect of his powers, his understanding of what those powers are and the apparent inability of the politicians to control him. Not a healthy state of affairs.
The police fed reps are Strathclyde officers, current and retired. They're effectively defending a policy implemented years ago to deal, successfully to be fair, with a problem that was unique to their part of Scotland. Maybe they feel that if they take their foot off the pedal, Glasgow will revert back to bad old days of Buckie fuelled ********* running about with machetes and chibs. Strathclyde had a policing style all of its own and I don't criticise that - thank **** I never had to work in Easterhouse or Paisley, Muirhouse and Pilton was plenty for me, thanks. But that style doesn't need rolling out across the rest of the country.
 

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