• ARRSE have partnered with Armadillo Merino to bring you an ARRSE exclusive, generous discount offer on their full price range.
    To keep you warm with the best of Merino gear, visit www.armadillomerino.co.uk and use the code: NEWARRSE40 at the checkout to get 40% off!
    This superb deal has been generously offered to us by Armadillo Merino and is valid until midnight on the the 28th of February.

Scotland-Ireland undersea rail link plan 'a surprise'

B

Boozy

Guest
#2
Damn, when I saw the link I thought this was a modern suggestion. It would be amazing if there was a channel tunnel style link -I'd be yoyoing about back and forth! No need to get on one of those dodgy wee propeller planes ever again!
 
#3
Damn, when I saw the link I thought this was a modern suggestion. It would be amazing if there was a channel tunnel style link -I'd be yoyoing about back and forth! No need to get on one of those dodgy wee propeller planes ever again!
Yea it would be more reliable as well.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
I saw this on the news earlier, and wondered - is this idea actually feasible? How deep is the Irish Sea at the proposed crossing points, too deep to tunnel under? Any reason why this has never been done?
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#5
Perhaps they could do it like the HK Harbour tunnel - but longer and deeper. It was built by digging a trench and then dropping and joining pre-formed tunnel segments covering them and pumping the water out. Simples - OK not simple but...
 
#6
The original idea for the Channel called for steam trains and a huge man made island to cope with the resupply of air and what not.

Subterranea Britannica: Sites: Channel Tunnel - 1880 attempt


This idea called for a tube laid ont he channel bed, held in place and supplied with air by paddle steamers... H&S anyone?


This was the earliest idea.

Ideas of this sort were always being bandied about. But who would pay? And who would do it?

This was also the time we were throwing tunnels under the Thames.

A time of great technological advances, if we someone paid for it... and who really wanted to go to Ireland in the 1800s?
 
#8
IIRC the bit between NI and Scotland is pretty deep and holds a lot of WW2 ordenance which gets dragged up quite frequently. During the early 90's (maybe late 80's). I did hear of a scheme similar to the HK harbour scheme as described by BA above between Holyhead and Dublin (66 miles) this being the best route geography wise. Either a tunnel or a bridge would be the salvation of Ireland, economy wise.
 
T

trowel

Guest
#9
IIRC the bit between NI and Scotland is pretty deep and holds a lot of WW2 ordenance which gets dragged up quite frequently. During the early 90's (maybe late 80's). I did hear of a scheme similar to the HK harbour scheme as described by BA above between Holyhead and Dublin (66 miles) this being the best route geography wise. Either a tunnel or a bridge would be the salvation of Ireland, economy wise.
Ireland no longer produces "good men with shovels". So the tunnel`s out.
 
#10
Very large,very thick Perspex tube my G/daughter has just suggested,,,(No you cannot see her tit's even if she IS 17)(they are mine all mine)..
 
#12
Either a tunnel or a bridge would be the salvation of Ireland, economy wise.
80+ miles... From Anglesey to Dublin. Or Haverford West to Waterford... don't know what the roads are like in Waterford, but my experiences of Haverford West and Anglesey don't lend credence to th idea.

Then there is the small matter that the distance is over three times the length of the current longest sea bridge in the world.

But other than than, what could go wrong?
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#13
80+ miles... From Anglesey to Dublin. Or Haverford West to Waterford... don't know what the roads are like in Waterford, but my experiences of Haverford West and Anglesey don't lend credence to th idea.

Then there is the small matter that the distance is over three times the length of the current longest sea bridge in the world.

But other than than, what could go wrong?
NI and Scotland are a wee bit closer than that. It's about 33 miles between Stranraer and Larne so an underwater tunnel would be about the same as the Channel Tunnel.

Mind you I can't really see the English taxpayer wanting to foot the bill for it and if there is money to be had for transport infrastructure they could start by building a decent road up to Inverness and Aberdeen. They must be the only major cities in western Europe that are only accessible by a single lane road.
 
#14
80+ miles... From Anglesey to Dublin. Or Haverford West to Waterford... don't know what the roads are like in Waterford, but my experiences of Haverford West and Anglesey don't lend credence to th idea.

Then there is the small matter that the distance is over three times the length of the current longest sea bridge in the world.

But other than than, what could go wrong?
Slightly further west then Haverfordwest really. Nearest bit of Ireland is Wexford

Edited to add:

A tunnel there would be really handy for me and might stop the two ferry companies from price fixing at an extortionate rate
 
#15
80+ miles... From Anglesey to Dublin. Or Haverford West to Waterford... don't know what the roads are like in Waterford, but my experiences of Haverford West and Anglesey don't lend credence to th idea.

Then there is the small matter that the distance is over three times the length of the current longest sea bridge in the world.

But other than than, what could go wrong?
They were talking about a 21 mile bridge between Northern Ireland and Scotland, and at the time the Republic of Ireland was going to contribute to the cost.
 
#16
A tunnel between Stranraer-Belfast would certainly improve that dire connection,

And it would certainly cause a stir with Stena & P&O, one of them would certainly end up ceasing crossings (P&O probably seeing as Stena are currently building their new terminal just north of Cairnryan)
 
#18
As a economical kick start a possibility actually physically possible yes but a difficult task but probably the biggest opposition to this pipe dream would be the wee Ire-landers horrified at the thought of a road link between the north and there close Scottish cousins.

Lets not forget this was a beer Matt dream of some Victorian engineer
 
#19
IIRC the bit between NI and Scotland is pretty deep and holds a lot of WW2 ordenance which gets dragged up quite frequently. During the early 90's (maybe late 80's). I did hear of a scheme similar to the HK harbour scheme as described by BA above between Holyhead and Dublin (66 miles) this being the best route geography wise. Either a tunnel or a bridge would be the salvation of Ireland, economy wise.

In use as a dump earlier than WW2 me old mucker! just along the road from me, its a frequent occurence a bit of washed up ordinance, last warnings in the local rag were to watch out for phos drying out and igniting!

http://www.secretscotland.org.uk/index.php/Secrets/BeaufortsDyke
 

Latest Threads