Scores killed in Baghdad attacks

#1
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/4244068.stm

At least 75 people have been killed and scores injured in a car bomb in a mainly Shia area of the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, police sources say.
The device was reportedly detonated by a suicide attacker amid a group of labourers in the Kadhimiya district.

It was the deadliest car bomb in Iraq for several weeks.

A couple of hours earlier, gunmen killed 17 people in the nearby town of Taji after dragging them from their homes in the middle of the night.

There have been frequent sectarian killings in Baghdad and central Iraq as mainly Sunni insurgents seek to incite fear and hatred between the Muslim communities.

When is this going to end? How is it going to end?
 
#2
PTP, you know as well as I do that as with the Protestants and Catholics in the Christian faith, Sunni & Shia Muslims hate each other and have 'tribal memories' going back centuries. It's impossible to apply logic to such hatred, so I fear this will never end. So long as one person is willing to take up arms against another purely because of their faith there will always be an escalating reaction... :(
 
#3
PTP, it's most likely to end when they have a strong leader. Saddam was a class 'A' cnut, but he ruled with an iron fist and there were no inter-faith problems.

Same happened in the Balkans under Tito.

They need an exceptionally good leader who they can trust and rally behind. Can't see that happening in the next few years. Perhaps it will all boil up into another arab vs arab war and then they will settle down.

That region does seem to have a pattern of peace then war, peace then war.
 
#4
By Mohammed Ramahi and Faris Mehdawi
BAGHDAD (Reuters) - A suicide bomber killed 114 people in a crowd of Shi'ite laborers in the bloodiest of a wave of attacks in Baghdad, and a statement attributed to Iraq's al Qaeda leader Abu Musab al-Zarqawi declared war on Shi'ites.

A total of more than 150 people were killed in Wednesday's violence and the suicide bombing was the second deadliest single attack since the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in March 2003 and the start soon afterwards of an insurgency by Sunni Arabs.

Fears of civil war have grown in the run-up to an October 15 referendum on a disputed new constitution for Iraq that is backed by the Shi'ite- and Kurdish-led government. Sunni politicians oppose the charter.

Zarqawi said his declaration of war on Iraq's majority Shi'ite Muslims was in response to the offensive mounted by U.S. and Iraqi forces against insurgents in the town of Tal Afar near the Syrian border, according to an Internet audio tape.

Iraq says nearly 160 insurgents have been killed in the offensive that began on Saturday. Both Baghdad and Washington say Tal Afar is a staging post for foreign fighters entering Iraq from Syria
http://today.reuters.com/news/newsA..._HO423204_RTRIDST_0_INTERNATIONAL-IRAQ-DC.XML


Oh chri*t
 
#5
Agent_Smith said:
PTP, it's most likely to end when they have a strong leader. Saddam was a class 'A' cnut, but he ruled with an iron fist and there were no inter-faith problems.

Same happened in the Balkans under Tito.

They need an exceptionally good leader who they can trust and rally behind. Can't see that happening in the next few years. Perhaps it will all boil up into another arab vs arab war and then they will settle down.

That region does seem to have a pattern of peace then war, peace then war.
Couldn't agree more. Why many times democracy in NI was stripped (I mean direct governing of NI from London)? Because autaritarian mothods in this concrete case was (is?) more efficient. Let's recognise obvious fact, that on this stage of development of Iraqi society democracy is less efficient than dictatorship.
 
#6
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/4247646.stm

Iraq's capital Baghdad has been hit by a series of deadly blasts for a second day running, killing more than 26.
In the first attack, at least 16 police commandos were killed when their patrol was struck in southern Doura district.

Hours later, 10 more policemen died in the same area following two more bomb attacks and ensuing gun battles between police and insurgents.

The blast follows Wednesday's violence, Iraq's deadliest since the 2003 US-led invasion. More than 182 people died.

The BBC's Caroline Hawley in Baghdad says the militants are making good on their threats of more bloodshed following the attacks on Wednesday.
 
#7
KGB_resident said:
Agent_Smith said:
PTP, it's most likely to end when they have a strong leader. Saddam was a class 'A' cnut, but he ruled with an iron fist and there were no inter-faith problems.

Same happened in the Balkans under Tito.

They need an exceptionally good leader who they can trust and rally behind. Can't see that happening in the next few years. Perhaps it will all boil up into another arab vs arab war and then they will settle down.

That region does seem to have a pattern of peace then war, peace then war.
Couldn't agree more. Why many times democracy in NI was stripped (I mean direct governing of NI from London)? Because autaritarian mothods in this concrete case was (is?) more efficient. Let's recognise obvious fact, that on this stage of development of Iraqi society democracy is less efficient than dictatorship.
In the terms you are talking about, dictatorship is always more efficient, that which needs doing is done without the requirement for political sanction. Hence, when things go belly up, goverments introduce states of emergency. Dictatorship within democracy as a function of that democracy.
 

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