Scientist creates "hangover-free alcohol"

#1
http://msn.netdoctor.co.uk/uk/msn/news/index.jsp?id=8400&D=13&M=4&Y=2006

Drinkers could soon be enjoying their favourite tipple safe in the knowledge they won't embarrass themselves or have a mammoth hangover the next day.

Bristol University scientist David Nutt told New Scientist magazine that partial antagionists, or PAs, could be put into drinks to make us merry instead of falling-down drunk - and stop us from getting hangovers.

Alcohol affects the brain by latching onto signalling molecules called GABA-A receptors. There are several subtypes of these receptors, some of which are linked to the effects of alcohol, such as memory loss and poor balance.

Memory loss in particular appears to occur when alcohol binds to a certain subtype. Professor Nutt says it could be possible to design PA molecules which can bind to GABA-A receptors and prevent alcohol from having an adverse effect.

Such PAs already exist as bretazenil and pagoclone, which were developed as anti-anxiety drugs.

An antidote to such drugs exists in the form of flumazenil, which is used as an antidote to overdoses of valium. It could also, in theory, be used to neutralise the effect of alcohol.

Professor Nutt said: "You could envisage the situation … at a party where PAs are taken and before the end of the night, revellers take a flumazenil and they sober up, so they can drive home.

The findings of the study will be published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology next month.
8)
 
#3
So you won't get drunk and you won't have a hangover - no matter how much you drink.

Absolutely stupid idea because if you don't get drunk then in all likelihood people will continue drinking as if it's a soft drink and unlesss they remove the alcohol from the drink then the amounts of alcohol consumed and absorbed into the system is more likely to be damaging or even have the potential for being at levels which are fatal.

A BAC (Blood Alcohol Concentration) of .15 (BAC is given as milligrams of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood (mg/100ml) would cause low level drinkers to pass out. .2 is seriously boozed and whilst .4 is considered to be the fatal dose, your average plonker checks out at around .35.

Think this is science being clever but unwise unless they include something to make you puke at around .2 (there are companies working on this so that you stay below the 80mg/100ml legal limit) and that would remove the benefits of having this in the first place.

Of course hangovers are down to dehydration and other effects of alcohol so can't see how this works in the morning - would have been better news on April the first!

P
 
#4
Just realised that prof. Nutt (clue there?) and his take the pill and sober up claim.

Does he sell snake oli as well? The effects might have gone but if one was stopped, so too has the licence.

Beginning to think that this is an April fool.

P

Addedd - having looked at the papers Prof Nutt has published on this - this triggers the body into behaving as if alcohol has been taken with out any entering the system. You can't drink any alcohol but you'll feel like you have. When you want to go home you simply popanother pill and the feelings of drunkeness leave you.

Wow, how apealling!
 
#5
Padre said:
So you won't get drunk and you won't have a hangover - no matter how much you drink.

Absolutely stupid idea because if you don't get drunk then in all likelihood people will continue drinking as if it's a soft drink and unlesss they remove the alcohol from the drink then the amounts of alcohol consumed and absorbed into the system is more likely to be damaging or even have the potential for being at levels which are fatal.

A BAC (Blood Alcohol Concentration) of .15 (BAC is given as milligrams of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood (mg/100ml) would cause low level drinkers to pass out. .2 is seriously boozed and whilst .4 is considered to be the fatal dose, your average plonker checks out at around .35.

Think this is science being clever but unwise unless they include something to make you puke at around .2 (there are companies working on this so that you stay below the 80mg/100ml legal limit) and that would remove the benefits of having this in the first place.

Of course hangovers are down to dehydration and other effects of alcohol so can't see how this works in the morning - would have been better news on April the first!

P
Padre,

Are you not quoting figures in microgrammes per 100ml breath, rather than milligrammes blood? If memory serves, 80mg/100ml blood is equivalent to 35 mcg/100ml breath.
 
#6
Memory loss in particular appears to occur when alcohol binds to a certain subtype. Professor Nutt says it could be possible to design PA molecules which can bind to GABA-A receptors and prevent alcohol from having an adverse effect.
Sorry I forgot what I was going to say
 

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