Science Fiction.

Seeing as all I have is an air rifle I'd be proper fcuked. Mind you the Labradors never ending appetite for stinky stuff would actually pay off in that scenario.
The zombie apocalypse IRL would result in a lot of fat happy dogs.
Zombie Labradors?
 
I found a copy of Wasp and one of Next of Kin in Forbidden Planet - I think the Americans have a lot of the better sci fi still available and they sometimes ship to them. I got rid of the husband rather than letting him have any say on my books. Romance is dead when you consider the alternative is losing the Gil the Arm series of Niven books.
Gil the ARM, or Arm, is an excellent substitute for all that mushy romance guff.

Has anyone seen The Expanse and noted the Larry Niven aspects of Belter culture? It's very similar.
 
Gil the ARM, or Arm, is an excellent substitute for all that mushy romance guff.

Has anyone seen The Expanse and noted the Larry Niven aspects of Belter culture? It's very similar.
Yes indeed, in fact I was thinking the very same thing on my walk. Great minds and all that.
The Expanse seems to be a very similar concept, the point of divergence being The Ring as opposed to the arrival of a Protector in the Solar System.
 

chrismcd

Old-Salt
Gil the ARM, or Arm, is an excellent substitute for all that mushy romance guff.

Has anyone seen The Expanse and noted the Larry Niven aspects of Belter culture? It's very similar.
Talking of Niven, has Pournelle been mentioned?
I have not gone right to the start of the thread.

1614723397387.png
 
Talking of Niven, has Pournelle been mentioned?
I have not gone right to the start of the thread.

View attachment 553993
Yeah. Footfall and Mote books were mentioned.

I remember reading Footfall yonks ago. Late 80s or something and finding it a fairly odd specimen.
 
In fact, speaking further of Niven. Interested observers of the Known Universe might or might not know that his story "The Soft Weapon", featuring the Kzinti, was used verbatim for a Star Trek: The Animated Series episode.

Strange but true. It's on Amazon for free, or was during Lockdown Pt 1.
 
Indeed, love a bit of that sort of genre, (despite the dickishness of some people on sites devoted to it), JB takes the Final Countdown scenario and runs with it. I particularly enjoy the culture shock aspects of it as the WW2 generation struggle to come to grips with the somewhat right on 21st century task force.
Anyway, good bloke, funny and not worth your time.
He has a blog: CheeseburgerGothic
Cool - I bought the three books, started the first one and for some reason didn't get far into it - will try again.
 
Seeing as all I have is an air rifle I'd be proper fcuked. Mind you the Labradors never ending appetite for stinky stuff would actually pay off in that scenario.
The zombie apocalypse IRL would result in a lot of fat happy dogs.
Unless they get infected from eating zombie flesh

 
I know right? And I stocked up on studded codpieces and everything. Turns out the "apocalypse" is more a an insidious blend of Huxley and Orwell than an exhilarating white line nightmare.

Indeed, love a bit of that sort of genre, (despite the dickishness of some people on sites devoted to it), JB takes the Final Countdown scenario and runs with it. I particularly enjoy the culture shock aspects of it as the WW2 generation struggle to come to grips with the somewhat right on 21st century task force.
Anyway, good bloke, funny and not worth your time.
He has a blog: CheeseburgerGothic
I still remember when they outed J Edger Hoover as a screaming bender.
 
Charlie Stross has just release a new Laundry novel (well, sort of. The series has progressed from The Laundry Files to Tales Of New Management (Laundry Universe).

The first novel (released last month) is Dead Lies Dreaming. Bought it and It is next on my reading list after I have finished all the Mick Herron novels - 4.5 to go).

There is a novella set in the Laundry series due for release this summer: Escape From Puroland

Still the only SF writer to give a shout-out to ARRSE in his work (and possibly an occasional denizen of these hallowed pages).

Nope. Ben Aaronovitch did in one of his books.
 
Why would you need to transfer them to dead tree versions?

I took to ebooks like a duck to water and have fifty years worth of books packed in boxes in a spare room. I have not ferreted around in the boxes for about five years.

I actually prefer ebooks to real books nowadays. I can get thousands of them on my iPad (but don't as I want to keep it relatively unstuffed).

I keep the bulk of them on my laptop with three backups spread all over the place. I can sort them, search them, share them and categorise them easily. Currently there are about 6500 books in roughly 35GB of storage - taking up zero space in the logical world.

They will be readily available to me for the rest of my reasonable life expectancy. After I croak I don't really GAF (although I would like them to be useful to somebody).

Ditto my music collection - hi-fi, albums, cassettes and CDs all boxed up. My daughters can flog them off when I move to pastures new. Replaced with about 45GB on the laptop and about 80GB on the iPod.

Ironically, when I was a youngster this was all science fiction.

I'm the opposite. It feels good to feel the weight, to open it and smell the pages, the anticipation of turning the page and seeing new words. The whole experience makes the difference.
 
I'm the opposite. It feels good to feel the weight, to open it and smell the pages, the anticipation of turning the page and seeing new words. The whole experience makes the difference.
I've got books falling apart from the amount of times I've read them. I've put them into storage (sadly) and bought the ebook versions. Most of the translations from dead paper to electronics are fine, but some of the older stuff that useless companies have bought the rights to and republished suck badly. I've just finished reading "Ringworld Engineers", it's like the bloody proofreaders quit halfway through. Bad spelling mistakes, entire words and lines missing. It was terrible.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Not off the top of my head, but it was a throwaway comment while he was relaxing in his annex.

All of them are worth reading, if a bit D&E. Less so in the last couple.
I've just finished reading "False Values". Might have to go back and reread the series again.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Just noticed this thread after a few years.
This book and a short story had me hoping that Stirling would pick up Fraser's lance and resurrect Flashman, alas, it has not come to pass.
Yes, Shikari was good too. It'd be great to see a US Civil War Flashman.
 

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