Science Fiction.

I'd boastfully respond that if you have a yard of Asimov on your shelf, you're ok. But that doesn't mean or include Dick. Aldiss, Anderson, Ballard, Bliss, Bester just for the first few letters of the alphabet. Just don't say Moorcock; I've been reading the Guardian again and I'm in no mood.
Sounds like my bookshelves (when I had them - collection currently in boxes awaiting library construction in new house). But I do really like Banks.
 
Sounds like my bookshelves (when I had them - collection currently in boxes awaiting library construction in new house). But I do really like Banks.
Can’t stand him either!
You see what I mean, I think. I rejected Banks early on, and have nothing of his, but oddly have a few Moorcock products littering the place; no idea why. I keep returning to James Blish, but apart from that haven't read any SF for a year or so; Roman/palaeo history gets in the way, as well as the occasional gem from these pages - 'The White Rabbit' for the last few days.

Nothing compares with Vance, though. Sigh...
 
You see what I mean, I think. I rejected Banks early on, and have nothing of his, but oddly have a few Moorcock products littering the place; no idea why. I keep returning to James Blish, but apart from that haven't read any SF for a year or so; Roman/palaeo history gets in the way, as well as the occasional gem from these pages - 'The White Rabbit' for the last few days.

Nothing compares with Vance, though. Sigh...
Vance is good too!
 
Oh, dear. I appreciate the difference in tastes in any literature, but I take issue with the inclusion of Banks in 'the Greats'. A journeyman writer, if that, surely. In comparison to the breadth of imagination of Heinlein, his is ... lower on the scale. My opinion, and I stand on it.
I would probably agree with you regards Heinlein v Banks, but it's like chalk and cheese. RAH wrote some of the best SF ever, but Bank's Culture novels, especially Excession, I think can be as good, but written for the end of the 20th Century, rather than the middle of it. And to be honest, some of RAH's later stuff was not nearly his best.
 
I've read a fair bit of more modern science fiction and nothing compares to Iain.M.Banks in my opinion.
I cannot decide if it is he or Terry Prachett who are the greatest losses to modern literature......perhaps Douglas Adams?

Banks didn't write books, he wrote space opera's, huge, engrossing novels that are enjoyable no matter how many times I read them.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Oh, dear. I appreciate the difference in tastes in any literature, but I take issue with the inclusion of Banks in 'the Greats'. A journeyman writer, if that, surely. In comparison to the breadth of imagination of Heinlein, his is ... lower on the scale. My opinion, and I stand on it.
Agreed, Heinlein was a god.
I've read a fair bit of more modern science fiction and nothing compares to Iain.M.Banks in my opinion.
I cannot decide if it is he or Terry Prachett who are the greatest losses to modern literature......perhaps Douglas Adams?

Banks didn't write books, he wrote space opera's, huge, engrossing novels that are enjoyable no matter how many times I read them.
Pratchett, by a country mile. Followed by Philip Kerr.
 
We may have a small difference of opinion here.

Mind you, I'm firmly stuck in the mid, mid-to-early-late 20th century for my taste in SF. My taste, by the way, is exquisite. So there.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
When it comes to live authors, Peter F Hamilton grabs my attention whenever I pick up his books, Charles Stross is unmissable when a new Laundry tale comes out, Aaronovitch's Rivers series is still good, and the Coreys' Expanse is classic space opera, perfectly executed.
 

tgo

War Hero
When it comes to live authors, Peter F Hamilton grabs my attention whenever I pick up his books, Charles Stross is unmissable when a new Laundry tale comes out, Aaronovitch's Rivers series is still good, and the Coreys' Expanse is classic space opera, perfectly executed.
You may like Neal Ashers stuff too.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
I'd boastfully respond that if you have a yard of Asimov on your shelf, you're ok. But that doesn't mean or include Dick. Aldiss, Anderson, Ballard, Bliss, Bester just for the first few letters of the alphabet. Just don't say Moorcock; I've been reading the Guardian again and I'm in no mood.
Just for you.

 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
I'd boastfully respond that if you have a yard of Asimov on your shelf, you're ok. But that doesn't mean or include Dick. Aldiss, Anderson, Ballard, Bliss, Bester just for the first few letters of the alphabet. Just don't say Moorcock; I've been reading the Guardian again and I'm in no mood.
I'll see your Asimov (fnarr) and raise you a shelf and a bit of NEL Heinlein goodness, along with a shedload of Pratchett:

1614247382407.png


Not a mention of Jeheric Carnelian to be found, BTW...
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Those shelves are obscenely, anally ordered. This is what bookshelves should look like:
View attachment 552418
You sir are in need of some more bookshelves.

Then you would be able to cast your eyes on an edifice of uncluttered bibliographical architecture such as this:

1614257613756.png
 

TamH70

MIA
When it comes to live authors, Peter F Hamilton grabs my attention whenever I pick up his books, Charles Stross is unmissable when a new Laundry tale comes out, Aaronovitch's Rivers series is still good, and the Coreys' Expanse is classic space opera, perfectly executed.

Charlie Stross has just release a new Laundry novel (well, sort of. The series has progressed from The Laundry Files to Tales Of New Management (Laundry Universe).

The first novel (released last month) is Dead Lies Dreaming. Bought it and It is next on my reading list after I have finished all the Mick Herron novels - 4.5 to go).

There is a novella set in the Laundry series due for release this summer: Escape From Puroland

Still the only SF writer to give a shout-out to ARRSE in his work (and possibly an occasional denizen of these hallowed pages).
 

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