Schoolgirls Heading for Syria

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
You know, we used to have all the legislation we needed to deal with these scumbags.

The UK only abolished the death sentence for treason in 1998 (thanks Tony, you cnut). Whilst the death penalty is seen as passe these days, treason still carries a maximum of life imprisonment. If she comes back, march the guilty bitch in and give her the maximum in the worst prison we have.

Of course, it would be absolutely terrible if, while she was waiting for her repatriation, she was a victim of a stray bullet or bomb.

Although I've read the above posts about stripping her of her citizenship, I will believe it when I see it.
 
The current situation as I see it:

Assumptions
1. SB was born in Britain to parents, at least one of whom was of Bangladeshi citizenship at that time.
2. SB has not revoked, or otherwise lost, her Bangladeshi citizenship since then.

Facts
3. SB has dual British/Bangladeshi citizenship automatically from birth.
4. SB did/does not have to make an application in order for either citizenship to take effect.
5. SB did/does have to make an application for a passport for either country (as does anyone else).
6. Holding a passport is not required to prove citizenship, but is merely an aid to international travel.

Outcomes
7. HMG are entitled to remove SB's British citizenship as this does not, as a person of dual citizenship, render her stateless.
8. By falling back on her Bangladeshi citizenship there is no requirement/expectation that she goes to live in Bangladesh.
9. As a Bangladeshi citizen she is entitled to travel, with the appropriate documents, wherever any Bangladeshi citizen is allowed to.
10. With no British citizenship she cannot obtain consular assistance from any British (or EU) consulate, e.g. obtain emergency travel documents.
11. She can apply for emergency travel documents from a Bangladeshi consulate and they have a consulate in Damascus.

I hold the same concern as @Arte_et_Marte regarding the strict legality of the method used to advise SB of her loss of British citizenship. Sending a letter just to her family doesn't quite cut it.
 
If it is decided to take these people back consider resettlement on South Georgia Island. With a bit of effort and ingenuity they should be able built a thriving community free from the satanic influence of the west. But by all means keep a patrol vessel on station to contain them in their peaceful ways.
 
I hold the same concern as @Arte_et_Marte regarding the strict legality of the method used to advise SB of her loss of British citizenship. Sending a letter just to her family doesn't quite cut it.
What else can they do?
We have no diplomatic staff in the country in which she currently lives.
I believe that she's in a combatant held area.
She appears to be in regular contact with her family in the UK
 

Sadurian

LE
Book Reviewer
I hold the same concern as @Arte_et_Marte regarding the strict legality of the method used to advise SB of her loss of British citizenship. Sending a letter just to her family doesn't quite cut it.
The letter is for information only. It was an attempt to transmit the Home Secretary's decision to Begum, which is why it was asking her family to pass the information on, and to inform the HO of any acting solicitors. Remember that the Home Office has no officials in place to tell Begum in person.

The decision was taken. Passing the information on would follow the usual 'all reasonable methods' to contact her, just as with any other judicial decisions. Given that Begum is in a camp in the middle of hostile territory without British consular access or other official methods of contact, the definition of 'reasonable' attempt to contact her might vary, but contacting her family is a good start.
 
If it is decided to take these people back consider resettlement on South Georgia Island. With a bit of effort and ingenuity they should be able built a thriving community free from the satanic influence of the west. But by all means keep a patrol vessel on station to contain them in their peaceful ways.
Oi, think about the poor sods on patrol. The S Atlantic can be a bitch to be sailing on, especially in the breezy months.
 
The letter is for information only. It was an attempt to transmit the Home Secretary's decision to Begum, which is why it was asking her family to pass the information on, and to inform the HO of any acting solicitors. Remember that the Home Office has no officials in place to tell Begum in person.

The decision was taken. Passing the information on would follow the usual 'all reasonable methods' to contact her, just as with any other judicial decisions. Given that Begum is in a camp in the middle of hostile territory without British consular access or other official methods of contact, the definition of 'reasonable' attempt to contact her might vary, but contacting her family is a good start.
Couldn't we just write it on a heavy thing and drop it off a plane?

I'd imagine a 2,000lb JDAM would be large enough to convey the full message and we'd have a good chance of getting it to her.
 
@theoriginalphantom and @Sadurian I agree with both your points as far as any argument may go but the law says:

(5) Before making an order under this section in respect of a person the Secretary of State must give the person written notice specifying—
(a) that the Secretary of State has decided to make an order,
(b) the reasons for the order, and
(c) the person’s right of appeal under section 40A(1) or under section 2B of the Special Immigration Appeals Commission Act 1997 (c. 68 ).
The argument will be around "give the person".

[edited to remove spurious smiley]
 
Already stated, the Dutch will laugh at her, but you never know...we might see her in the EU migrant thread
Child will automatically be Dutch ( as Father is)
Watching newsnight at the moment, there is a chap talking about laws, he has just talked about her potential Bangladeshi citizenship.

With a perfectly straight and serious face he has said that in may be unfair and wrong to suggest she goes to live in Bangladesh as 'the situation in that country is not very nice'.

Perhaps he thinks living within Isis was a bit like being at Centreparks :)
Ask any international cabin crew where their least favourite destination to fly is!
 
Some interesting points made above on the legalities of this development. Some of the online information on Bangladeshi citizenship rules appears contradictory on whether this person actually has citizenship of that country, or is merely entitled to apply for it. It is rightly well established that we cannot, by withdrawing British citizenship, make a person stateless. However, under the British Nationality Act the Secretary of State can deprive such a person of British nationality if he has reasonable grounds for believing that the person is able to become a national of another country.
So under that Nationality Act the government could theoretically remove the British Citizenship status of everyone in Northern Ireland because under the Good Friday Agreement NI citizens are able to gain Irish citizenship?
 
The current situation as I see it:

Assumptions
1. SB was born in Britain to parents, at least one of whom was of Bangladeshi citizenship at that time.
2. SB has not revoked, or otherwise lost, her Bangladeshi citizenship since then.

Facts
3. SB has dual British/Bangladeshi citizenship automatically from birth.
Isn't 3 based on an assumption 1 & so not a fact? &, even if 1 is true 3 doesn't automatically follow but depends on Bangladeshi law - which I hope the minister has studied closely rather than just "doing a Shoesmith"
 
So under that Nationality Act the government could theoretically remove the British Citizenship status of everyone in Northern Ireland because under the Good Friday Agreement NI citizens are able to gain Irish citizenship?
It's not just the availability of another nationality, the Secretary of State must be "satisfied that the deprivation is conducive to the public good because the person, while having that citizenship status, has conducted him or herself in a manner which is seriously prejudicial to the vital interests of the United Kingdom..." Whether that applies to anyone in N Ireland would be for a different topic!
 
No you can't we got caught out a while trying to make another two people stateless

UK blocked from making alleged extremists stateless by secret court in ruling that will set precedent

They seem to have based the argument on the idea that she is a dual British-Bangladeshi citizen (having been born there I think) and another that she may have Dual Citizenship but through her marrying a Dutch ISIS member.

Family, & Lawyers now saying she has never held dual citizenship, this is gonna take awhile

Can the Home Secretary prevent Shamina Begum returning to the UK? - BarristerBlogger

What happened in a case just like Shamima Begum’s
She was born in London, but her parents did not become British citizens until she was three years old.
 
@theoriginalphantom and @Sadurian I agree with both your points as far as any argument may go but the law says:



The argument will be around "give the person".

[edited to remove spurious smiley]
In that case we best allow her to arrive at a point of entry then send her back with the letter handed to her. That would cruel, or are you suggesting that we send 'someone from the ministry' over there to act as international postman?

1550660843919.png

It's hardly St Trinians over there

we can see that she's had the info, so it's clearly worked.
 
Child will automatically be Dutch ( as Father is)


Ask any international cabin crew where their least favourite destination to fly is!
You might need to expand on that for me, traditionally the worst places to be don't tend to have international flights landing there.

The very last BA crew to land in Kuwait before GW1 being a well known example (and loved by conspiracy theorists)
I think they would have preferred Bangladesh, they might have got back home a bit quicker. :)
 

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