School to buy washing machine for dirty children..

#62
#64
Stop making excuses,it comes down to shite parenting.

Growing up late 40's onwards, all washing was done in the sink, hot water came from a large kettle on the gas stove, both my mum and dad worked, going out of the house at about 07:30 every morning, mum getting home about 17:30 every night, Bath night, in front of an electric fire on Sunday night, if I got shitty mucky during the week, stand in a small tin bath in the kitchen, washed all over in cold water and a bar of Fairy soap. My job at a very early age, when I came home from school, light the gas oven and, the stove under the individual saucepans.

Never had toothpaste until I was about 11, Saxa Table Salt and a toothbrush (anyone who knows me will tell you I f*****g hate salt on anything). the first washing machine I used was, when I was posted to Germany in 65.

It takes an effort to send kids to school clean, as has already been said, if some skinny kid in the middle of Africa can go to school clean every day, it doen't say a lot for parents in this country !

Rant over, where's my Ovaltine ?
We are obviously of a similar age and when we were kids the whole country was poor following the ravages of WW2 . I think the approach to parenting must have been so different then .... with what little we had my mother still had pride in our house and how her children were turned out ... no washing machine ... a copper boiler and green soap ... the clothes may have been tired and sometimes threadbare but were clean .
 
#65
How about one of these at the front door of the school then?

View attachment 338906
Absolutely!
either do a scratch & sniff test & direct kids that need a scrub through it, or put everyone through.
I know would have been glad of an extra 15 mins in bed instead of all that washing nonsense. Staff & kids could turn up in their pyjamas...it's not like half the parents aren't in onsies/trackies anyway.
Go to your locker (or The Issueing Department) change into uniform. Change back at the end of the day, sorted. I'd have shoe-polishing machines like in hotel corridors as well.

Start small with a pressure washer and febreze 'curtain' at the front door
 
#67
Stop making excuses,it comes down to shite parenting.

Growing up late 40's onwards, all washing was done in the sink, hot water came from a large kettle on the gas stove, both my mum and dad worked, going out of the house at about 07:30 every morning, mum getting home about 17:30 every night, Bath night, in front of an electric fire on Sunday night, if I got shitty mucky during the week, stand in a small tin bath in the kitchen, washed all over in cold water and a bar of Fairy soap. My job at a very early age, when I came home from school, light the gas oven and, the stove under the individual saucepans.

Never had toothpaste until I was about 11, Saxa Table Salt and a toothbrush (anyone who knows me will tell you I f*****g hate salt on anything). the first washing machine I used was, when I was posted to Germany in 65.

It takes an effort to send kids to school clean, as has already been said, if some skinny kid in the middle of Africa can go to school clean every day, it doen't say a lot for parents in this country !

Rant over, where's my Ovaltine ?
We are obviously of a similar age and when we were kids the whole country was poor following the ravages of WW2 . I think the approach to parenting must have been so different then .... with what little we had my mother still had pride in our house and how her children were turned out ... no washing machine ... a copper boiler and green soap ... the clothes may have been tired and sometimes threadbare but were clean .
Oh Christ, it's the Professional Yorkshiremen....

 
#68
Oh Christ, it's the Professional Yorkshiremen....

.... well I suppose looking back it was really quite cushy looking at what the Yorkshiremen , who to me live in the deep South , had to endure .... hardship must be relative .
 
#70
.... well I suppose looking back it was really quite cushy looking at what the Yorkshiremen , who to me live in the deep South , had to endure .... hardship must be relative .
It can't have been that far away, Reivers were on both side of the border!!!
 
#71
I think some schools have been doing this for a while. ISTR hearing articles about this subject earlier in the year.
A long time ago, I did a lot of work on School Board primary schools. There were a whole lot of these red-brick schools built around the 1880s, when some Education Act first made attendance at primary schools mandatory. The schools all had similar features.

The local authority had a plan room which had the original plans for the schools, hand drawn on linen and coloured. I had to refer to these plans. One of the schools (I forget which one) had a washing machine, an 1880s washing-machine, as a part of the original installed equipment. It had a open-topped stave-built wooden tub, (i.e, constructed like a wooden cask) which I think was 6 or 8 feet in diameter, a rotating paddle in the middle and a belt drive connecting it to a coal-fired steam engine.

The schools also had coal fires in every class, staging to raise the desks at the back of the class, 60 children per class and ventilation shafts, 1 brick square flues that had a grille at high level in the classrooms and terminated at the chimney stacks to discharge the fug produced by 60 unwashed smelly children.

The water storage tanks were built of teak planks, lined with welded lead sheets; they were still in use in the 1980s.

Nothing new.


.
 
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#73
Seems to be no problem in the far East .... ... the young lady is delighted with the results of the wash ...


They're in a similar situation to that of the UK 100+ years ago, few/no people of colour to get outraged by racist adverts or insensitive names for black dogs.

pears.jpeg


Nothing new.
 
#74
They're in a similar situation to that of the UK 100+ years ago, few/no people of colour to get outraged by racist adverts or insensitive names for black dogs.

View attachment 338929

Nothing new.
... Indeed .... just a young Yorkshire miner part way through his bath .
 
#75
Stop making excuses,it comes down to shite parenting.

Growing up late 40's onwards, all washing was done in the sink, hot water came from a large kettle on the gas stove, both my mum and dad worked, going out of the house at about 07:30 every morning, mum getting home about 17:30 every night, Bath night, in front of an electric fire on Sunday night, if I got shitty mucky during the week, stand in a small tin bath in the kitchen, washed all over in cold water and a bar of Fairy soap. My job at a very early age, when I came home from school, light the gas oven and, the stove under the individual saucepans.

Never had toothpaste until I was about 11, Saxa Table Salt and a toothbrush (anyone who knows me will tell you I f*****g hate salt on anything). the first washing machine I used was, when I was posted to Germany in 65.

It takes an effort to send kids to school clean, as has already been said, if some skinny kid in the middle of Africa can go to school clean every day, it doen't say a lot for parents in this country !

Rant over, where's my Ovaltine ?
Cracking post.
 
#76
It would take more than an industrial washer to remove even a couple of layers of his oleaginous secretions...
That’s the ‘O’ word dropped. Standby for another brief spike in usage on here, as more people discover it, and then quickly drop off until about...September maybe?
 
#79
Just thought.
God help the poor bastard who picks a Zanussi with a "Whites Only" setting.

" Pish-soaked & shit encrusted Smelly Tints Matter"
 
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#80
. Parents are increasingly being absolved of parental responsibility and the fall guys are expected to be the Teachers.
Custom and Practice, widely publicised examples and altruism by staff, real or with one eye on publicity, will translate very quickly in to society holding Teachers responsible for the appearance, hygiene, manners, entertainment, guardianship, diet and well being of the child...totally, financially and morally, nearly 24/7. .
The State has been destroying the institution of " family " for over 80 years now . If you take ALL responsibility for childrearing away from parents you get two benefits . Firstly , you educate the child from the age of three to think in the way you the State want to and secondly , it frees up both parents , and even grand parents , to toil at work and pay taxes .
 
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